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Programme Archive provides archive service for programmes in the past 12 months.
Due to occasional air time discrepancies, online programme archive might not be in complete perfection.

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The Pulse
22/07/2017
The Pulse
Last Friday, in response to a legal action brought by then Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and Secretary for Justice Rimsky Yuen, the High Court disqualified four pro-democracy legislators for the way they took their oaths of office. This with the earlier disqualifications of Leung Chung-hang and Yau Wai-ching, effectively invalidates some 180,000 public votes for pro-democratic politicians. According to a report released by the Census and Statistics Department last month, the richest households in Hong Kong now earn around 44 times more than the poorest. The gap between the rich and poor is at a historic high. Hong Kong’s home to 1.16 million elderly, 2.6% more than five years ago. Almost a third are classified as poor elderly. Although they receive a small government payment of so-called “fruit money”, they find it hard to survive. Meanwhile, Chief executive Carrie Lam said, “subdivided flats” is just to be regarded as a general term. After all, not all of them are illegal or contravening fire safety and building regulations. Ms Lam’s Transport and Housing minister Frank Chan is even suggesting the government get in on the act by building and renting more of them as a temporary solution to our housing problem. If it’s hard for young working people to keep a roof over their head, spare a thought for Hong Kong’s elderly, a third of whom officially live in poverty. Some try to do a little manual work to survive, but a sometimes-hostile government bureaucracy only adds to their problems. For a society that claims to respect its elders, Hong Kong is not necessarily doing so well. It’s just over a week since the death of Nobel laureate and activist Liu Xiaobo. His body was cremated just three days later, his ashes scattered in the sea. The government says his wife Liu Xia and his friends are free to move as they wish, but it\'s understood they are being kept incommunicado. News of his death, and responses to it, is highly censored across the mainland. The aim of scattering the ashes at sea was likely to avoid creating any site for his supporters to gather in tribute. It may have backfired. The sea makes up two thirds of the world’s surface, and people in China and elsewhere are turning there to pay their respects. We’ll leave you for this week with images of the commemoration in Hong Kong and Liu’s friends in Beijing.
Hong Kong My Home II
21/07/2017
Hong Kong My Home II
Ethnic minorities find it formidable to find their feet in the society as they always have to work twice as hard as the locals. It may make things easier if they have company in their drudgery. In Hong Kong, there are two locals who have witnessed the growth of an Indian youngster and have become his guardian angels on this journey. KO Wing-chi, a.k.a. KJ, is an Indian boy who was born in Hong Kong. He is 16 and now studying in secondary four. KJ is a committee member of the student association as well as the president of the “Virtue” Society. He is also a sunshine boy who excels at the popular beat box and he always performs outside on behalf of his school. JIM Siu-bo is an 18-year-old secondary six student who was born in Hong Kong, and he is also a member of the Beat Box Club. Three years ago, the two with such disparate backgrounds came across each other because of beat box, and they had eventually become best friends forever. They two learn from each other and take care of each other. It is hard for us to imagine that sharing feelings to each other is what these two robust boys do most. Although the two study in different grades, they are inseparable like cheek by jowl both inside and outside school. JIM Siu-bo is KO Wing-chi’s first teacher in beat box, and they do everything from playing basketball to skateboarding together. It is an antithesis of the idea that true friendship can never be realised between ethnic minority students and local students since integration among them is difficult. Besides KJ’s peers, WONG Kin-ho, the teacher responsible for counselling ethnic minorities at school, also has great impact on him. The teacher-student bond between the two has now grown into something like a father-son one. Mr. WONG is more than a Chinese language teacher but a mentor that beacons KJ’s life. Two Hong Kong people not only have greatly influenced KO Wing-chi, they have also become his witnesses and guardian angels on his way towards another direction in life.
The Pulse
15/07/2017
The Pulse
On Christmas Day, 2009, Liu Xiaobo was sentenced to 11 years imprisonment and two years deprivation of political rights for “inciting subversion of state power”. Two days before his sentence, he wrote his “I Have No Enemies: My Final Statement”. It was intended to be read out in court but he was not allowed to finish reading it. A year later, Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. His death on Thursday made him the second winner of that prize to die in captivity. The first, Carl von Ossietzky, who was awarded the prize in 1935, also died in hospital while detained by the Nazi regime. Like Liu, he had been banned from collecting the award himself. Governments and organisations around the world had pleaded for Liu to be allowed to leave China for treatment. Here in Hong Kong, pro-Beijing lawmakers refused to allow his plight to even be debated in Legco, and Chief Executive Carrie Lam said it’s not her role to exert “pressure” on the central government over Liu’s fate. Coverage of Liu Xiaobo’s death in China has been muted. On social media, messages saying “RIP” or even showing candle emojis are being deleted. With me in the studio is William Nee, China Researcher at Amnesty International Hong Kong. When Chinese President Xi Jinping came to town two weeks ago to mark the 20th anniversary of the Handover, he laid down red lines Hong Kong should not cross. He said that, on day-to-day matters, we must “be guided by a strong sense of “one country”, and firmly observe the principle of “one country””. Any attempt to endanger China’s sovereignty and security and challenge the power of the central government is “an act that crosses the red line, and is absolutely impermissible.” The president’s hard line and incidents such as the treatment of Liu Xiaobo and other dissidents continue to unnerve many Hongkongers, some of whom are planning to leave, but many mainlanders Hong Kong are keen to live here as they the SAR as a land of opportunity.
Nature and Man in One 2016
14/07/2017
Nature and Man in One 2016
The journey reaches its destination at last, after treading through several green nation states and understanding countless green technology. Back to where it all began, maybe we should ask ourselves, what is ‘waste’ after all? Sweden, a nation state at the forefront of environmental protection, has set its target to become a fossil-fuel-free nation by 2050. Malmö, the nation’s third largest city, is transformed from an industrial-based city to one that combines green consciousness with technology, made possible by the implementation of a green strategy. Stockholm, the nation’s capital, is the first European Green Capital. These outstanding achievements are not so much engineered by green organizations or business, but each and every one in the nation. Since its inception in 1967, the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency has been debating, researching and exploring for a few decades and the nation has developed a comprehensive policy on waste management. Today, only not more than 1% of domestic waste of the whole nation ends up in landfill. The remarkable achievement of the Swedes is the result of strict implementation of guidelines on waste hierarchy. Yet, the environmental protection sector thinks that there is room for improvement still. Göran, who works in an incineration company, opines that although Sweden’s waste-to-energy performance is first-class, his vision for the nation is that there will not be any waste for incineration. Environmental protection, as an industry, is not a novelty. However, is it always profit which drives the sustainable operation of the green sector? Maybe Kim, the person-in-charge of a material recycling organization, can give us another answer. He firmly believes that the practice of putting ecology as an important factor in business is an education in itself. It enables the next generation to understand that one cannot take more than one can give. We always think that sustainability and economic development is mutually exclusive. Through the implementation of different measures, from using bees as ecological indicators to the soon-to-be-completed nature path, Airport Director Peter Weinhandl and Environmental Manager Maria Bengtsson of Malmö Airport try to resolve the contradictory nature of ecology and economics. They are very proud of their work. Tracing the green footsteps of Sweden for the past 50 years, it is not difficult to discover that sustainability is not purely an ecological issue. It is also a way of life rooted in culture. If it is the people of Sweden who made the Green Nation possible, it is indeed their conception of conservation, nature and life itself in the more minute sense. The story of a sunken ship in Northern Europe has a strange resonance with the oriental sensibility of ‘everything is useful, however useless it might seem’. With a failed maiden voyage, Vasa has been hidden deep in the sea for three hundred years. Yet, she is given a new life through its failed history. On the Midsummer’s Day, after saying goodbye to the flora and fauna, we cross the forest which belongs to everyone. Allmansrätten – the right to enjoy nature – is written in the Swedish constitution. It enables every civilian to access even private forest, to ski, walk, fish and pick fruits, and to enjoy nature. Chatting with a young Swede. What effect does the green education has on the new generation of Swedes? How does it affect their perception of the future and imagination? Everything has its own course. We are all passer-bys of time and space. Waste, from being useless to become useful, undergoes a never-ending cycle of journey. In this sense, what can we take with us and leave behind during our own course of life? In the final destination, we visit a small island near Gothenburg and meet a biologist. Susanne Wiigh-Mäsak is the founder of Promessa who promotes the self-researched Eco-burial actively. With advanced freeze-drying technology, coffin with human remains would be turned into powder, which is transformed into harmless nutrients for the soil. It is ‘dust to dust’ truly indeed. Though this ideal is yet to be realized, the scientist believes that this is the most sincere remuneration human beings can give to mother nature as its steward, complying with its course. Journeys start from the here and now. Stones of other mountains might seem far away. Yet, be it the cosmic world or our own insignificant conception, any new journey begins with the transformation of the mind in order to become one with nature. May we walk on for this city and this world?

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節目重溫

節目重溫提供過往12個月的節目。
由於電台廣播時間有時可能出現偏差,網上存放的節目重溫版本因此未必絕對完整。

PROGRAMME ARCHIVE

Programme Archive provides archive service for programmes in the past 12 months.
Due to occasional air time discrepancies, online programme archive might not be in complete perfection.