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18/08/2018
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Genghis Khan is a venerated ancestor of the Mongolians. Although the days when Genghis Khan led his hordes of army galloping boisterously can no longer be seen, from a distance, the rocky hill standing among the bevy of mountains at Aolunbulage somehow resemble Genghis Khan in his Mongolian coat armor defending the gateway alone with his life for his people, a scene redolent of his tremendous achievements. Aolunbulage is located at Alxa League on the Northwest of Inner Mongolia wherein magnificently roseate rocks, and fantastically grotesque canyons bestrew its surrounding that blow people away in admiration of the Creator’s mind-boggling craftsmanship. Aolunbulage Canyon is perched at the Hetao Plain East of Lang Mountain where the Ancient Yellow River Course once lied. Through thousand years of waxing and waning among the traces on earth left by torrential flow of the river, and the marks on rocks imprinted by sand and wind erosion during the arid weather, there arise the sinuous watercourse and canyon that span over tens of kilometres. The rocks on both sides of the canyon are either formed by coarse materials that are unconsolidated in nature or fine materials that are consolidated. Through fluvial erosion of the Yellow River in ancient time, the rocks had formed uniformly identical texture with uneven surfaces. The rocks are rich in iron, hence crimson in colour similar to rust glittering under the sunshine. Everything in front of oneself in the canyon swivels in a spiral and dazzles vertiginously as if one has entered a dream world. If one raises his head and looks at the top of the canyon, there shows the evidence of wind erosion that continuously molds the rocks into bizarre shapes as if the scene changes along with every step one takes which is so bewilderingly gorgeous. Through their unbound imagination, the Mongolians even granted visualised names to these rocks, thereby giving them infinite vitality. In the past, the pasturers in Aolunbulage led nomadic lives. They called any place with grassland and water their home, took the earth as bed and the sky as blanket. Nowadays, not many of them stay in the pasturing business – even if they still do, they do not live like nomads anymore. Instead, they build their own houses and settle down, making a livelihood mainly by pasturing sheep and camels. They also grow vegetables, which renders them self-sufficient in food and provides extra income when they sell the crops. However, Aolunbulage’s arid climate and piercingly cold wind of sand have resulted in an increasing scarcity of places suitable for pasturing. Still, a kind of plant flourishes amid this unforgiving environment – Haloxylon ammodendron. As a variety of shrub, it is usually one to two metres tall, with a maximum height of five or six metres. This plant may not look attractive, but as its roots can hold the soil and sand tightly in place while its twigs and leaves shield soil from the wind, it has been crucial in preventing desertification. Haloxylon ammodendron has a stable character. Even with all types of extraordinary canyons and rocks towering behind, it remains undistracted and faces the wind of sand calmly while fulfilling its responsibility of safeguarding the land. This is probably a reflection of how people live in the Aolunbulage area. Living under this kind of condition has trained them to be diligent and enduring in challenges which they strive to overcome. And this gives a sense of reality that touches your heart in a dream-like canyon. Assistant Producer: Cindy CHAN Producer: Lawrence LEUNG
17/08/2018
Sports for All
Sports for All
Roller Skating was extremely popular in the 1980’s both as a recreational sport and a trend. In the mid and late 1990’s, inline roller skating started to gain popularity. With its improved equipment that makes it easier for skaters, it has become a hit in Europe and America, and even developed into a professional sport. There are several types of roller skating sports – speed skating, artistic roller skating, freestyle skating, inline hockey, and rink hockey. Now included in tournaments in many places around the globe, speed skating is also featured in its own sport competitions. Coach For All: Angie WONG A retired local roller skater, Angie has loved the sport ever since her first time skating at the age of eight. In fact, it was her mother who liked roller skating in the first place but lacked an opportunity to skate. When the chance came, she encouraged Angie to give it a try. Angie was reluctant at first, yet skated for four hours after entering the rink. Later, Angie went to practise nearly every day. The rink in Victoria Park was basically her second home. There she met a lot of like-minded friends and trained many students. She focused on artistic roller skating earlier, but later switched to speed skating. Angie’s best result is winning the first runner-up in a national Chinese contest in 2001. Afterwards, she retired to study in Australia, deciding to leave the roller skating arena for good. Unexpectedly, her younger sister’s fame and outstanding performance in roller skating contests made her eager to skate again, and so she returned to the scene of roller skating. Now she is mainly devoted to the work of a coach and a judge, as well as the promotion of roller skating. She often steers athletes from various regions to competitions in different parts of the world. Athlete For All: Charmaigne, Jamie, Mike, Martin, Richard, Tingki, Wing In Hong Kong, children and teenagers make up the majority of learners of roller skating. This time, however, we will be training adults who are also parents! They are all over thirty years old. As parents, they experience immense pressure from everyday life, family and work. They spend most of their energy and time on their children, which leaves them minimal time for physical exercise. Yet these parents have decided to leave their family behind for a moment to put on the skating shoes and take up the challenge of learning a new sport. Their challenges include a speed skating race in which speed is the key to winning, and an obstacle course that requires simple figure skills. Finally we will see whether they can manage a freestyle roller skating race that demands sophisticated techniques.
15/08/2018
Everyday Design (English Version)
Everyday Design (English Version)
Clothes are wearable designs which mirror one’s preferences and lifestyle. Not only are clothes of fine quality comfortable to wear, but they also underscore the merits and characters of the wearers. How much thought have the designers and fabricators given to this? Knitwear used to be everyday apparel for people from all sectors. Although the design of knitwear seems humdrum, its manufacturing process consists of many meticulous procedures. Mr. NG Chi-ming, who has manufactured knitwear for almost 60 years, will lay bare the little secret behind the undying popularity of knitwear. Polly HO, a designer, is enchanted by gambiered silk, a traditional fabric from Guangdong. The dyeing of this fabric is natural and environmentally friendly that teems with folk wisdom. She combines the gambiered silk with the printed clothes she designed to make clothing abounds with modern and narrative colours. How do elements of antiquity and novelty integrate beautifully and pass on? Does threadbare clothing represent the lower class? Rex KO, a designer who loves antique apparel, examines the world history through clothing and reflects on the definition of equality. He and Mr FAT, a leather designer, enhance classic clothing designs and design modern apparel for motorcyclists. Will they be able to place together aesthetics and practicality at the same time? Although suits are work clothes for many office workers, it does not mean they have to be monotonous. Brandice and Luke specialise in tailor-making suits which engages both their craftsmanship and creativity for customers. How do they step out of the box and produce clothing that expresses individuality, yet is wearable all the time?
11/08/2018
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Although water is the stream of life, there are barely any signs of life in the salt lake situated in the Qaidam Basin of Qinghai Province. The salinity of the lake water here is higher than that of seawater, thus forming a thick white layer of salt crust on the lake’s surface. When the weather is merry, the blue sky reflects upon the water of Chaka Salt Lake as it does to a mirror, and this is how it comes to be known as the “Mirror of the Sky” in China. The place where perched the Qaidam Basin was once a part of the vast ocean eons ago, but diastrophism gave rise to high mountains which later formed the basin wherein the deposition and dehydration of seawater took place by which one after another salt lake was formed. Besides edible salts, the basin is abundant in valuable mineral resources that can be employed for development in aerospace technology, military affairs, medicine, etc. Therefore, highways and modern factories have been constructed in Qaidam Basin, the “cornucopia of resources”, in recent years. Although the Mongolian people who live in this arid land of desolation share a place with such treasures, they still follow the nomadic lifestyle of their ancestors and move in pursuit of water and grass. For them, horses are the treasures that matter most. Nevertheless, the red and black goji berries bred by this alkalinity-rich land also bring them wealth. It seems that people under the boundless firmament lying above such spacious land always acquire the treasures meant for them. Assistant Producer: Mandy KWOK Producer: Christine YU
10/08/2018
Sports for All
Sports for All
Kayaking is a sport that requires stamina and strength. When one is kayaking in the boundless sea all alone, not only does it take willpower, but it is also human’s intimate moment with ocean and nature. Dragon Boating is a sport that requires explosive power and team spirit. In order to row a dragon boat loaded with over 10 persons to the finish line, solidarity matters the most, thus every member has to pull together in unison with rhythmic paddle stroke. Although these two forms of rowing sports are similar, the spirits behind them are different. However, individuals, communities, and nature can be blended harmoniously if the two are combined. In this episode of “Sports for All”, kayaking player Angel HO and dragon boat coach Jacky SO work together to train a group of blind persons, so as to test their willpower and team spirit through kayaking and dragon boating. Coach for All – Kayaking Player Angel HO Angel HO came into contact with kayaking when she was 26 and immediately fell in love with the sport. Months later, she participated in the kayak race in Tuen Mun District and won the championship after which she has begun her journey as an athlete. Since 2010, Angel has started participating in international competitions and has captured championship successively in the kayak races held in Taiwan, Malaysia, Korea, etc. In 2014, she even represented Hong Kong to participate in the kayak race of the Asian Games in Incheon. In recent years, she devotes herself as a coach in the hope of inspiring younger generations through kayaking. Athlete for All – Blind Persons: Big Brother, Uncle Fat, Loaf, Clara, Wing-chi Although the five blind persons went blind for different reasons, some were born blind while others were rendered blind by illnesses, they all share a common belief: “Blindness does not stand in the way of life.” Big Brother teaches Kung Fu to hearten other blind persons; Uncle Fat plays music in search of inner tranquility; Loaf builds his business of selling cookies to prove his capacity; Clara works as an actress to conquer her inward fears; and Wing-chi actively partakes in group activities. This time, they join the Kayaking / Dragon Boating training of Angel HO and Jacky SO. Not only do they have to participate in a dragon boat race to build a connection to the world, but they also have to complete a test of kayaking for 100 meters alone which challenges both their willpower and team spirit.
18/08/2018
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Cultural Heritage-The Land
Genghis Khan is a venerated ancestor of the Mongolians. Although the days when Genghis Khan led his hordes of army galloping boisterously can no longer be seen, from a distance, the rocky hill standing among the bevy of mountains at Aolunbulage somehow resemble Genghis Khan in his Mongolian coat armor defending the gateway alone with his life for his people, a scene redolent of his tremendous achievements. Aolunbulage is located at Alxa League on the Northwest of Inner Mongolia wherein magnificently roseate rocks, and fantastically grotesque canyons bestrew its surrounding that blow people away in admiration of the Creator’s mind-boggling craftsmanship. Aolunbulage Canyon is perched at the Hetao Plain East of Lang Mountain where the Ancient Yellow River Course once lied. Through thousand years of waxing and waning among the traces on earth left by torrential flow of the river, and the marks on rocks imprinted by sand and wind erosion during the arid weather, there arise the sinuous watercourse and canyon that span over tens of kilometres. The rocks on both sides of the canyon are either formed by coarse materials that are unconsolidated in nature or fine materials that are consolidated. Through fluvial erosion of the Yellow River in ancient time, the rocks had formed uniformly identical texture with uneven surfaces. The rocks are rich in iron, hence crimson in colour similar to rust glittering under the sunshine. Everything in front of oneself in the canyon swivels in a spiral and dazzles vertiginously as if one has entered a dream world. If one raises his head and looks at the top of the canyon, there shows the evidence of wind erosion that continuously molds the rocks into bizarre shapes as if the scene changes along with every step one takes which is so bewilderingly gorgeous. Through their unbound imagination, the Mongolians even granted visualised names to these rocks, thereby giving them infinite vitality. In the past, the pasturers in Aolunbulage led nomadic lives. They called any place with grassland and water their home, took the earth as bed and the sky as blanket. Nowadays, not many of them stay in the pasturing business – even if they still do, they do not live like nomads anymore. Instead, they build their own houses and settle down, making a livelihood mainly by pasturing sheep and camels. They also grow vegetables, which renders them self-sufficient in food and provides extra income when they sell the crops. However, Aolunbulage’s arid climate and piercingly cold wind of sand have resulted in an increasing scarcity of places suitable for pasturing. Still, a kind of plant flourishes amid this unforgiving environment – Haloxylon ammodendron. As a variety of shrub, it is usually one to two metres tall, with a maximum height of five or six metres. This plant may not look attractive, but as its roots can hold the soil and sand tightly in place while its twigs and leaves shield soil from the wind, it has been crucial in preventing desertification. Haloxylon ammodendron has a stable character. Even with all types of extraordinary canyons and rocks towering behind, it remains undistracted and faces the wind of sand calmly while fulfilling its responsibility of safeguarding the land. This is probably a reflection of how people live in the Aolunbulage area. Living under this kind of condition has trained them to be diligent and enduring in challenges which they strive to overcome. And this gives a sense of reality that touches your heart in a dream-like canyon. Assistant Producer: Cindy CHAN Producer: Lawrence LEUNG
17/08/2018
Sports for All
Sports for All
Roller Skating was extremely popular in the 1980’s both as a recreational sport and a trend. In the mid and late 1990’s, inline roller skating started to gain popularity. With its improved equipment that makes it easier for skaters, it has become a hit in Europe and America, and even developed into a professional sport. There are several types of roller skating sports – speed skating, artistic roller skating, freestyle skating, inline hockey, and rink hockey. Now included in tournaments in many places around the globe, speed skating is also featured in its own sport competitions. Coach For All: Angie WONG A retired local roller skater, Angie has loved the sport ever since her first time skating at the age of eight. In fact, it was her mother who liked roller skating in the first place but lacked an opportunity to skate. When the chance came, she encouraged Angie to give it a try. Angie was reluctant at first, yet skated for four hours after entering the rink. Later, Angie went to practise nearly every day. The rink in Victoria Park was basically her second home. There she met a lot of like-minded friends and trained many students. She focused on artistic roller skating earlier, but later switched to speed skating. Angie’s best result is winning the first runner-up in a national Chinese contest in 2001. Afterwards, she retired to study in Australia, deciding to leave the roller skating arena for good. Unexpectedly, her younger sister’s fame and outstanding performance in roller skating contests made her eager to skate again, and so she returned to the scene of roller skating. Now she is mainly devoted to the work of a coach and a judge, as well as the promotion of roller skating. She often steers athletes from various regions to competitions in different parts of the world. Athlete For All: Charmaigne, Jamie, Mike, Martin, Richard, Tingki, Wing In Hong Kong, children and teenagers make up the majority of learners of roller skating. This time, however, we will be training adults who are also parents! They are all over thirty years old. As parents, they experience immense pressure from everyday life, family and work. They spend most of their energy and time on their children, which leaves them minimal time for physical exercise. Yet these parents have decided to leave their family behind for a moment to put on the skating shoes and take up the challenge of learning a new sport. Their challenges include a speed skating race in which speed is the key to winning, and an obstacle course that requires simple figure skills. Finally we will see whether they can manage a freestyle roller skating race that demands sophisticated techniques.
01/08/2018
Everyday Design (English Version)
Everyday Design (English Version)
Home, a place utilised by everyone every day. Is there any space for creativity in home design apart from satisfying customers’ requests for functionality and aesthetics? How should home designers create a home of originality? In this episode, we will probe into lamps, wooden furniture, fragrant design and multifunctional furniture. Through the sharing and production of designers from different sectors, we will analyse the philosophy behind home design, the relationship between design and the real life, as well as the wisdom embedded therein. LAW Yat-ming is a lamp designer who loves to employ delightful things as his design elements. By using light and shadow along with his easy-to-use works, he shares with the users the concepts of his designs. Thomas WONG is one of the few furniture designers in Hong Kong. He insists on making furniture with solid wood using traditional carpentry techniques despite how time-consuming it is, in the hope of making his works more durable. Xavier TSANG, a fragrant designer, savours and captures the intangible odour with his heart and blend fitting fragrances for home. He even makes this smell of home portable, enabling it to stay in company with us all the time. Vincent LIM and Elaine LU are conjugal partners in furniture design. Although the couple’s preferences on design are poled apart, they have sought common ground through their shared language, design, which gives rise to flexible multifunctional furniture.
25/07/2018
The Works
The Works
The theme of the 29th annual Hong Kong Book Fair, which started last Wednesday, is “Romance Literature”, but you’d better not write about sex too explicitly, maybe even more so if you’re a Japanese author on record as having sided with Hong Kong’s protesters for democratic reform. Hong Kong’s Obscene Articles Tribunal has given Haruki Murakami’s “Killing Commendatore” a Class two “indecent rating” and the fair’s organisers have asked exhibitors to remove it from display. Hong Kong’s public libraries are also limiting its loan to readers over 18. In recent days the OAT has also defined adult periodical Lung Fu Pao and a photo book by model Ealies Chau as class two publications. One person whose work has not been restricted is writer Quannan Shum, even though romance, love and eroticism are recurring themes in his writing. One of his novels, “Season with Lusts”, first published in 1984, has now been reprinted with illustrations by Montagut Chuen. There’s been another controversy involving the West Kowloon Cultural District Authority, this time over the fact that it had directly paid subcontractors working on building the M+ museum on behalf of its financially-troubled main contractor Hsin Chong Construction without first consulting the legislature. Lawmakers are calling for a special meeting in the Legislative Council to look into the matter. M+ is scheduled to open next year, two years behind its original schedule. A smaller venue, M+ Pavilion, used for exhibitions, opened two years ago. On show there until the end of September is a selection from its Southeast Asian art collections. Chinese landscape painting of the Song, Ming and Qing periods presented idealised landscapes incorporating elements such as water, lofty mountains, stones, gardens, animals, and literary gatherings. The paintings embody their creators’ longing to escape from worldly pressures and retreat into nature. But what role does Chinese landscape painting play in the modern world? On show at Hanart TZ Gallery until the end of August, “Luo Ying: Layered Hills” showcases over 50 works by the contemporary Chinese landscape painter. Hong Kong has one of the world’s longest urban life expectancies, at 81.3 years for men and 87.3 years for women, although there’s some controversy about comparing the population of a developed city with that of entire countries. And the percentage of older people in the community is growing fast. But Hong Kong’s senior citizens are also a creative resource and a reservoir of memory. Well, that’s it from us for this week and in fact for this series. We’ll take a short summer break and will be back at the end of September. See you then.
01/09/2017
Hong Kong My Home II
Hong Kong My Home II
Some ethnic minorities find it hard to make a living or find a job because of language or cultural barriers. However, there are some of them who are proficient in Chinese but still toil and moil simply because of their skin colour. Diversity and openness are always highlighted in Hong Kong, so that ethnic minorities can play more roles in the society, among which is Maggie with Pakistani descent. Maggie is now an Officer of Correctional Services who serves at the Lo Wu Correctional Institution as an area-in-charge officer. She speaks fluent Cantonese because she was born in Hong Kong. She was abandoned by her parents when she was three months old at an orphanage and was adopted by a Hong Kong family when she was three. She has never come into contact with her biological parents and she knows nothing about Pakistani culture. She had been studying in mainstream schools in Hong Kong since her childhood with no difference between her and other Chinese children besides her appearance. However, she was always regarded as an “alien” and taunted by others because of her skin colour. Maggie cannot bear to think of the past, but her bitter childhood has pushed Maggie further in studies. Eventually, she was admitted into the Chinese University of Hong Kong and returned to her old school and worked as a teacher after graduation. Maggie joined the Correctional Services Department a year ago as a challenge to herself. She has won the trust of ethnic minority inmates because of the Pakistani appearance, but she cannot speak or understand their languages. To better understand her own origin and ethnic history, Maggie is now studying Pakistani and Pakistani culture in hope of helping the Pakistanis in Hong Kong when her studies come to fruition.

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