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Programme Archive provides archive service for programmes in the past 12 months.
Due to occasional air time discrepancies, online programme archive might not be in complete perfection.

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Exploring the Edible Planet
21/04/2017
Exploring the Edible Planet
In the farmlands in the neighborhood of Lisbon, Portugal, Kannie learns the inconvenient truth that one third of farm crops are rejected by unmerciful traders, supermarket buyers, and market shoppers, they could never make it to the markets, let alone our plates. Why? The only sin: they are born ugly and to a world in which people look for perfection. What is the fate of the uglies? Trash! Kannie meets two young game changers - Isabel Soares and Mia Canelhas, who are devoted to tell people ‘beautiful people eat ugly fruit’. They take Kannie along their rescue missions, to pick, taste and collect the otherwise in-the-trash crops. Kannie is eager to know, do the ugly fruits and vegetables, with black spots, rough skin and unorthodox shapes, qualities arousing anything but appetite, taste alright? Who is to blame if they are not eaten, the fruits or the consumers? If one thinks that the two third of flawless vegetables and fruits can safely escape the fate of being buried in landfills, then s/he is wrong. In fact, consumers dump 40% of the food purchased by them. Raphael Fellmer, a German, calls for public awareness and a stop. He initiated ‘money strike’, living without money, and launched a food-sharing program, encouraging people to share surplus food with neighbors. Raphael has developed a team of volunteer food savers to build up communities all over Berlin for the mission. Their effort results in less food in the trash and more love in the communities. Intrigued by the effectiveness it works in Germany, Kannie shares the idea with Alvina Chan, a celebrity chef dedicated to serve the underprivileged. Together, they want to give it a try in Hong Kong. The midas touch of Alvina turned some stale overnight food residue into cuisine francaise. But can these two women find a like mind to share their passion, ideal, and more pressing, the food on the table? 20/4/2017 7:00 - 7:30pm TVB Pearl 21/4/2017 5:30 - 6:00pm RTHK31
The Pulse
22/04/2017
The Pulse
Fears of global military conflicts and wars have risen since Donald Trump took office as US president. So far, when not conducting foreign “diplomacy” by Twitter, he’s launched 59 missiles at Syria, dropped the “Mother of All Bombs” on Afghanistan, and taken a tough line on North Korea and its provocative missile tests. From the other side of the Pacific, North Korea has said, worrying even the People’s Republic of China, that it will test missiles every week if it wants, and threatened, “all out war” if it needs to retaliate. WIth us in the studio to talk about it is Jean-Pierre Cabestan, Head of Department of Government and International Studies of Baptist University. Ever wondered where our tax dollars go? Well, according to the government, infrastructural projects, many referred to by those less prone to cheerleading as “white elephants”, top expenditure, followed by education, social welfare and health. HK$100 billion is earmarked for such projects in this year’s Budget. One of the grandest is the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge. Critics have called it the “bridge to nowhere”, and not long after it’s completed it’s going to face competition from a new 24-km. bridge over the Pearl River Delta linking Zhongshan and Shenzhen. There are murmurs in some quarters that the Hong Kong-Macau-Zhuhai bridge isn’t going to be ready for commissioning, as scheduled, by the end of the year. The government insists it will, although there will still be some elements to complete. It’s 34 years since Hopewell Holdings founder Gordon Wu first suggested the idea. Agreements on funding were reached between Hong Kong, Macau and the mainland in 2008, and – inevitably – as with all such long running projects, it’s going to end up costing more than was planned. We have no idea of the safety record of the project on the mainland side, but in Hong Kong there’s been a considerable human cost, in terms of both injuries and death.
Hong Kong Stories-Professional Amateur
20/04/2017
Hong Kong Stories-Professional Amateur
Warout Lau is a piano tuner. But he doesn’t play the piano nor is he mesmerized by its crisp sounds. He is fascinated by the sound of something else, the gun. In 2003 Warout got hooked on practical shooting. This kind of air gun shooting activity requires you to accurately shoot all the targets in a simulated scenario in the shortest possible time. The gun holds a certain magic for Warout who loves machines. “From the first shot to the second and third shot, how fluidly and accurately they are executed is what fascinates me.” Warout is interested in how machines work. He started taking toy guns apart to study them when he was young. Later, with the support of his father, he started a shop after secondary school to repair and modify air guns. After 3 years his business went downhill. To make a living he decided to learn to be a piano tuner at a music store. He eventually took up work as a piano tuner. He has been working as one for over 20 years. He feels the gun and the piano have something in common. “How to make them work fluidly is my main area of work. With the piano you don’t just hit a key to make a sound. It’s important to make sure it works normally when you continue to play. It’s the same with guns. Once the bullet is fired you let go to allow all the parts return to their original place so that the second shot can be fired.” Warout loves practical shooting but he has not been able to make it his career. His dream is to promote this activity so it will be recognised as a sport. This is the only way shooters can become professional athletes or instructors.
The Works
19/04/2017
The Works
March, otherwise known as Art month brought several international artists to Hong Kong. Few are as monumental or as spectacular in their work as Christo, known not only for, with his late wife and long-time creative collaborator Jeanne-Claude, wrapping the Reichstag and the Pont Neuf, but also for covering the Japanese and Californian landscapes with hundreds of blue and yellow umbrellas. Japanese-American artist Tomokazu Matsuyama, perhaps more commonly known as Matsu, lives and works in New York. Growing up between, and influenced by, both Eastern and Western cultures, he described his artistic style as the “struggle of reckoning the familiar local with the familiar global”. That mixed identity is reflected in the influences on his work, which include Japanese art from the Edo and Meiji eras, classic Greek and Roman art, French Renaissance painting and contemporary art. Missing out on explosions, 3D, comic book heroes, or extensive computer graphics, the movie “Moonlight” would have almost certainly slipped under the radar of most Hongkongers if it hadn’t, in the same week it was released here, taken the Best Picture Oscar at the Academy Awards. It was certainly a memorable ceremony, including one of the most embarrassing gaffes in Oscar history, when the wrong envelope was given to co-presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and Dunaway announced “La La Land” as Best Picture. Directed by Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight” is the coming-of-age story of an African-American male coming to terms with his own homosexuality against the backdrop of a socially deprived and drug-ridden Miami neighbourhood. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards this year. It won three, including Best Picture, Best Actor in a Supporting Role and Best Writing of an Adapted Screenplay. The film’s co-producer, Andrew Hevia, was in Hong Kong last month for FILMART, and we caught up with him while he was here.
Exploring the Edible Planet
14/04/2017
Exploring the Edible Planet
Africa is a continent of irony. It has fertile land, amounting to 25% of the arable land in the world, yet 24% of its people suffer from malnutrition. Kannie wonders why the resourceful Africa cannot provide sufficient food for its people. Or in principle it can? In Nairobi, Kenya, she meets Patrick Maundu, an ethnobotanist and research scientist and is told that the key to food security in Kenya, as well as in Africa, is lying in their native land. It was lost for a few decades. The solution is simple enough - to eat like their grandparents. However, to make it happen, there is no simple shortcut. The colonial period of Kenya planted new crops in the land and new ideas in people’s mind. The new generations prefer westernized food and lifestyles. As a result, indigenous and traditional plants, which are nutritional and tolerant of the soil condition and drought, were abandoned by Kenyans. In the long run, they have become orphan crops, marginalized if not ceased to exist. Patrick wants to make a change. He knows that these orphan crops have to be replanted in the land, and to be served in restaurants and sold in markets. For two decades, he has travelled all over Kenya, painstakingly documenting, collecting and saving the orphan plants from extinction. He believes that, in the end the orphans will save the world. Kannie visits farmers, villagers and market sellers, to see how Kenyans respond to this old yet novel solution to food security. Afterwards, Kannie continues her journey to the north near to the equator, and is amused to meet a Chinese agriculture professor, Liu Gaoqiong helping to increase crop productivity in Kenya. She is even more amused to see professor Liu’s Kenyan tale being a practical one of feeding the hungry, as well as a romantic love story. Back in Hong Kong, Kannie is sad to learn that the highly urbanized Hong Kong has lost some indigenous yet cherished crops. Only old farmers have been struggling to keep the local crop diversity. Is it too late to save the lost species? 13/4/2017 7:00 - 7:30pm TVB Pearl 14/4/2017 5:30 - 6:00pm RTHK31

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節目重溫

節目重溫提供過往12個月的節目。
由於電台廣播時間有時可能出現偏差,網上存放的節目重溫版本因此未必絕對完整。

PROGRAMME ARCHIVE

Programme Archive provides archive service for programmes in the past 12 months.
Due to occasional air time discrepancies, online programme archive might not be in complete perfection.