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16/10/2018
Hong Kong Stories 37 - Connect with a Cause
Hong Kong Stories 37 - Connect with a Cause
As one of the fastest-changing and ever-busy cities, Hong Kong enjoys its reputation for its efficiency. Yet this extraordinary speed of growth and development doesn’t come without a price. While the city benefits from the fruit of its economic success, many traditional handicrafts, be they neon signs, hand-written minibus plates or hand-carved mahjong tiles, are on the verge of extinction as they are either being replaced by new technology or no longer needed. Joyce, who works at a digital marketing consultancy, noticed that Hong Kong people, like herself, tend to lament over the loss of yet another traditional handicraft shop only when they see it on the news. Having pondered what else she can do, she started a social enterprise named “Eldage”, and with her employer’s support, she made use of social media to tell the stories of those handicraft masters to raise the awareness of the public and sell their products online. Meanwhile, she let these artisans share their skills and stories through workshops which in turn attract hundreds of participants, many of which from the younger generations. The platform also draws the attention of aspired young people who offer to be volunteers in reporting, filming and even bladesmithing! Although it may seem impossible to have these handicrafts passed on as it used to to the next generation, by letting more people know about what they are and the beauty behind these craftsmanship, Joyce believes they can be revitalized in some other form one day.
17/10/2018
Hong Kong Stories - Tango in the Margin
Hong Kong Stories - Tango in the Margin
By the coast between Yau Tong and Lam Tin in East Kowloon is a forgotten corner. It is the Cha Kwo Ling Village, which is more than a century old, located on the outskirts of the urban area. The main street in the village is now disorderly cramped with squatter huts and entangled cables among them. The partly overlapping rooftops leave only narrow slits of the sky to be seen. In addition, the lack of main sewers means that flushing water is not available in most of the huts; therefore, many villagers rely solely on the public toilet near the village’s entrance. Everything there gives an impression of a fringe community where time stands still. About a century ago, Cha Kwo Ling Village was a major producer of high-quality granite and the home of many miners. The village had a population of over 10,000 in its heyday. As the mining industry lost its importance later on, the mines no longer exist even though you can still see the small hills. With only over a thousand residents in Cha Kwo Ling Village currently, there are merely several shops left on the main street. Among them is a cafe with the history of half a century. The décor inside is the same as it was fifty years ago, so upon walking into the cafe you feel as if you have travelled back to the 1960’s. The reason that keeps owner Uncle Keng and his wife running the old-fashioned cafe is to provide a place for fellow villagers to meet up. WU Lai-shan’s family has been living in Cha Kwo Ling Village for four generations, she is witnessing the village’s decline. According to her, the government has been speaking of developing the village ever since she was a child but it has been all talk and no action. Lai-shan feels there is nothing she can do about it. Although the village seems deserted now, she is still devoted to working as a tour guide in the village, introducing visitors to the past days of glory in great details. Having grown up in the village, the 18-year-old TUNG Kam-hei well understands how unsatisfactory the public facilities are in this fringe community. Even so, he does not wish the village to be demolished by the government. He only wishes that the village’s conditions can be improved, so that the only large-scale squatter area in Kowloon may be preserved as a witness of the history of Hong Kong. Producer: Tom Chan Assistant Producer: Dorothy Yip, Cindy Chan
17/10/2018
The Works
The Works
The annual Taiwan Culture Festival started last Thursday. The month-long programme includes operas, film screenings and exhibitions. Taiwanese photographer, Chang Chao Tang’s career spans more than five decades. Apart from his still photography, he has worked in television, documentaries, and feature films. On show until the end of this month, “A Journey of Nostalgia” showcases his love for nature and reveals why nostalgia keeps him going. Artist and landscape architect Sara Wong makes use of architectural, time-based and sculptural forms to explore urban movement and social engagement. Most recently she has curated “Sparkle! Journal of a City Foot Soldier”, inspired by the writer Paul Auster’s “City of Glass”. For this exhibition, at an artspace in Oil Street, she has invited several artists to present a series of approaches to, and perspectives on, cities and modern urban living. Formed in 2015, the five-member band, Nowhere Boys plays what they called “cinematic rock”. Their inspiration ranges from thrillers such as “The Butterfly Effect”, to Japanese animation films like Miyazaki’s “Castle in the Sky”. They wrote their own songs and recorded their debut EP in their homes with their own equipment. It was so successful that the first 1,000 copies they’d made sold out in three months. Now signed to a big label, the band still maintains that indie spirit and its members say they continue to go their own way musically. They are here to tell us more.
13/10/2018
The Pulse
The Pulse
On Wednesday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivered her second Policy Address. Her 40-minute speech highlighted several controversial policies and projects. And she doesn’t seem to mind courting controversy. “Dissatisfaction was expected”, she said, arguing that tough decisions had to be made. According to a University of Hong Kong survey, the public gave the Address only 48.5 marks, 13.9 marks fewer than her first one. Lam’s own popularity has also dropped to 47.6, an all-time low since she became Chief Executive. Just two weeks ago, and for the first time since the Handover, the Security Bureau used the Societies Ordinance to outlaw the Hong Kong National Party, a political group that has advocated Hong Kong independence. Secretary for Security John Lee warned that any act to destroy China’s sovereignty would cross an “untouchable red line”. However, he did not give a clear answer when asked whether people sharing the group’s views on social media or journalists reporting or interviewing its members would be breaking the law. However an indication of the government’s intentions in this matter when a prominent foreign correspondent was denied renewal of working visa. With me in the studio are Keith Richburg, formerly with the Washington Post in a number of capacities. He is now Director of Hong Kong University’s Journalism & Media Studies Centre and Chris Yeung, another veteran journalist and Chairperson of the Hong Kong Journalists’ Association to talk about the state of press freedom in Hong Kong.
12/10/2018
Gold Song Talk
Gold Song Talk
This year marks the 40th anniversary of the “Top Ten Chinese Gold Songs Award”, the most long-lasting award ceremony for the Hong Kong pop music industry. We take this opportunity to produce “Gold Song Talk”, and invite various eminent singers to visit different university campuses to have face-to-face interactions with students. They will reminisce about their music journeys and look forward to the future of the local pop music scene, as well as to share their life wisdom as veterans in the music industry. “Band Sound” has never been the mainstream in the Hong Kong pop music industry. Yet, Hong Kong bands can make miracles from time to time by creating touching music pieces. Their work breaks through the ingrained mindsets of the people in town, therefore an essential element in promoting the development of the local music scene. The theme for this episode is “Hong Kong Super Band.Spirit of Beyond” while the prominent and influential band Beyond is invited. Its member WONG Ka-keung pays his visit to Hong Kong Baptist University to share his experiences as a band member with over 300 students. From each and every classic of Beyond, to the thick and thin that the band has gone through, he will talk about them one by one. Another hotshot band Dear Jane is also invited. The band is comprised of vocalist Tim, guitarist Howie, bass guitarist Jackal and drummer Nice. People who play in a band in Hong Kong must have tasted the sweets and bitters of life, as well as the fickleness of human nature. When the ideal did not match the reality, how did they manage to persist and keep on with no regrets with the spirit of rock and roll? The four members will even perform the Beyond x Dear Jane Special Medley in order to bring the spirit of rock music to each and every student on the spot. Apart from “Super Band”, special guest Mr CHEUNG Man-sun, the then-Assistant Director of Broadcasting who is called the “Father of Gold Songs”, will appear in this episode. Mr CHEUNG had worked in the radio station for years, during which he launched the “Top Ten Chinese Gold Songs Award” and has witnessed the ups and downs of the local music scene. He will share with us one by one the hot trend of forming bands in the 80s; how Beyond begin from being anonymous to start having a little fame, then turned from being the “betrayers of rock music” to a band which was well-received by the audience, and finally raised to become a prestigious and legendary rock music group. Host: WONG Tin-yee
27/03/2018
Our Scientists (English Version)
Our Scientists (English Version)
Some say the science of chemistry dates back to the Stone Age when mankind first discovered fire. Early humans were fascinated by ways different objects react to burning, and developed the practice of alchemy. However, having failed to properly explain the transformations between states of matter, alchemy eventually gave way to modern chemistry. Over the years, the world of chemical substances and their myriad combinations have proved captivating to many, including Hong Kong chemist Che Chi-ming, who is determined to explore its unique allure. Che Chi-ming, the current Zhou Guangzhao Professor in Natural Sciences and Head of The Department of Chemistry, became the youngest Chair Professor in HKU history at age 35. He was also the youngest Academician and first scientist from Hong Kong at the time to be elected into the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as the first Hong Kong scientist to win the First Class prize of the State Natural Science Award – often dubbed “the Chinese Nobel Prize”. While these titles and accolades are testament to Professor Che’s accomplishments in scientific research and brought him fame, he gained the respect of his counterparts not only for his leadership in large research teams, but for his groundbreaking work in different arenas. An authority in both inorganic and organic chemistry, Che published in 1997 the first research report in the world on the conductive and fluorescent properties of metal-organic compounds. It paved the way for global developments in OLED, the technology deployed in mobile phones and TV displays by many world renowned brands. Meanwhile in Chinese medicine, when others are looking at the use of compound formulas to combat cancer, Professor Che would instead probe the use of single ingredients. Yet, a young Professor Che was once discouraged by his teachers from pursuing the study of chemistry because he did not perform well in experiments. Refusing to give up, Professor Che decided to turn his attention to designing chemical compounds and developing their applications. While engaging in postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, Che’s supervisor Harry Gray claimed that he “can make any compound you want”! Chemical experiments require focus, patience and commitment. If success means arriving at a particular conclusion, you might fail even after a thousand attempts. As with detective cases, you must get to the bottom of it all – if an ingredient manages to kill cancer cells, what is the exact cause and manner of death? How would other organs react? A long but rewarding inquisition ensues. While many people in their primes are already plotting their retirements, 60-year-old Professor Che feels that his golden age has just arrived. In chasing his dream, he believes Hong Kong can produce research standards to rival top-notch universities overseas.
12/09/2018
Everyday Design (English Version)
Everyday Design (English Version)
As a small and mountainous city where the concrete jungle and the verdant countryside coexist, Hong Kong is the home to a world-renowned unique landscape. Hiking and camping thus naturally became an activity for city dwellers during holidays. Spending a day or two in the wild provides a brief escape from urban boisterousness. For them, a breath of the nature and the return to the basics of life are antidotes to the stressful working life. While camping gear tended to give an impression of being simple and pragmatic in the past, people have been increasingly demanding on camping supplies in recent years, giving rise to the popularity of gear with sophisticated design from countries such as the United States and Japan. The forms of camping also have grown to be more varied. Each form, be it leisure-oriented or ultra-light, has their own supporters. As the camping population has flourished gradually, products available in the market may not be able to fulfill such a variety of needs, and some camping enthusiasts decided to get their hands on designing and making all kinds of camping gear themselves, hence the creation of independent outdoor gear brands. Camping fanatics LEUNG Ka-po (Po), Tara CHAN, and Royce YU all have their own full-time jobs, but share the devotion of designing different camping gear in their leisure time. Once a patient of mood disorder, Po feels that the sound of burning logs possesses a healing power. Having discovered white charcoal’s characteristic of being able to endure long heating without giving out fumes, he began to design and produce by hand cookware tailor-made for cooking with wood fire and charcoal. Graphic and multi-media designer Tara loves running in mountains and builds temporary homes in the countryside. He made room for a small studio in his home where he designs extra-light backpacks and bags, blending work and pleasure in one. His most recent project is designing camping shelters with brands from Mainland China. Product designer Royce is familiar with the process of manufacturing electronic products. He succeeded the first time raising money through crowd-funding for a multi-use camping lamp. He hopes to showcase the versatility of Hong Kongers to the world by combining the design of vintage gas lamps and LED lights.
13/10/2018
The Pulse
The Pulse
On Wednesday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivered her second Policy Address. Her 40-minute speech highlighted several controversial policies and projects. And she doesn’t seem to mind courting controversy. “Dissatisfaction was expected”, she said, arguing that tough decisions had to be made. According to a University of Hong Kong survey, the public gave the Address only 48.5 marks, 13.9 marks fewer than her first one. Lam’s own popularity has also dropped to 47.6, an all-time low since she became Chief Executive. Just two weeks ago, and for the first time since the Handover, the Security Bureau used the Societies Ordinance to outlaw the Hong Kong National Party, a political group that has advocated Hong Kong independence. Secretary for Security John Lee warned that any act to destroy China’s sovereignty would cross an “untouchable red line”. However, he did not give a clear answer when asked whether people sharing the group’s views on social media or journalists reporting or interviewing its members would be breaking the law. However an indication of the government’s intentions in this matter when a prominent foreign correspondent was denied renewal of working visa. With me in the studio are Keith Richburg, formerly with the Washington Post in a number of capacities. He is now Director of Hong Kong University’s Journalism & Media Studies Centre and Chris Yeung, another veteran journalist and Chairperson of the Hong Kong Journalists’ Association to talk about the state of press freedom in Hong Kong.
17/10/2018
The Works
The Works
The annual Taiwan Culture Festival started last Thursday. The month-long programme includes operas, film screenings and exhibitions. Taiwanese photographer, Chang Chao Tang’s career spans more than five decades. Apart from his still photography, he has worked in television, documentaries, and feature films. On show until the end of this month, “A Journey of Nostalgia” showcases his love for nature and reveals why nostalgia keeps him going. Artist and landscape architect Sara Wong makes use of architectural, time-based and sculptural forms to explore urban movement and social engagement. Most recently she has curated “Sparkle! Journal of a City Foot Soldier”, inspired by the writer Paul Auster’s “City of Glass”. For this exhibition, at an artspace in Oil Street, she has invited several artists to present a series of approaches to, and perspectives on, cities and modern urban living. Formed in 2015, the five-member band, Nowhere Boys plays what they called “cinematic rock”. Their inspiration ranges from thrillers such as “The Butterfly Effect”, to Japanese animation films like Miyazaki’s “Castle in the Sky”. They wrote their own songs and recorded their debut EP in their homes with their own equipment. It was so successful that the first 1,000 copies they’d made sold out in three months. Now signed to a big label, the band still maintains that indie spirit and its members say they continue to go their own way musically. They are here to tell us more.
17/10/2018
Hong Kong Stories - Tango in the Margin
Hong Kong Stories - Tango in the Margin
By the coast between Yau Tong and Lam Tin in East Kowloon is a forgotten corner. It is the Cha Kwo Ling Village, which is more than a century old, located on the outskirts of the urban area. The main street in the village is now disorderly cramped with squatter huts and entangled cables among them. The partly overlapping rooftops leave only narrow slits of the sky to be seen. In addition, the lack of main sewers means that flushing water is not available in most of the huts; therefore, many villagers rely solely on the public toilet near the village’s entrance. Everything there gives an impression of a fringe community where time stands still. About a century ago, Cha Kwo Ling Village was a major producer of high-quality granite and the home of many miners. The village had a population of over 10,000 in its heyday. As the mining industry lost its importance later on, the mines no longer exist even though you can still see the small hills. With only over a thousand residents in Cha Kwo Ling Village currently, there are merely several shops left on the main street. Among them is a cafe with the history of half a century. The décor inside is the same as it was fifty years ago, so upon walking into the cafe you feel as if you have travelled back to the 1960’s. The reason that keeps owner Uncle Keng and his wife running the old-fashioned cafe is to provide a place for fellow villagers to meet up. WU Lai-shan’s family has been living in Cha Kwo Ling Village for four generations, she is witnessing the village’s decline. According to her, the government has been speaking of developing the village ever since she was a child but it has been all talk and no action. Lai-shan feels there is nothing she can do about it. Although the village seems deserted now, she is still devoted to working as a tour guide in the village, introducing visitors to the past days of glory in great details. Having grown up in the village, the 18-year-old TUNG Kam-hei well understands how unsatisfactory the public facilities are in this fringe community. Even so, he does not wish the village to be demolished by the government. He only wishes that the village’s conditions can be improved, so that the only large-scale squatter area in Kowloon may be preserved as a witness of the history of Hong Kong. Producer: Tom Chan Assistant Producer: Dorothy Yip, Cindy Chan
16/10/2018
Hong Kong Stories 37 - Connect with a Cause
Hong Kong Stories 37 - Connect with a Cause
As one of the fastest-changing and ever-busy cities, Hong Kong enjoys its reputation for its efficiency. Yet this extraordinary speed of growth and development doesn’t come without a price. While the city benefits from the fruit of its economic success, many traditional handicrafts, be they neon signs, hand-written minibus plates or hand-carved mahjong tiles, are on the verge of extinction as they are either being replaced by new technology or no longer needed. Joyce, who works at a digital marketing consultancy, noticed that Hong Kong people, like herself, tend to lament over the loss of yet another traditional handicraft shop only when they see it on the news. Having pondered what else she can do, she started a social enterprise named “Eldage”, and with her employer’s support, she made use of social media to tell the stories of those handicraft masters to raise the awareness of the public and sell their products online. Meanwhile, she let these artisans share their skills and stories through workshops which in turn attract hundreds of participants, many of which from the younger generations. The platform also draws the attention of aspired young people who offer to be volunteers in reporting, filming and even bladesmithing! Although it may seem impossible to have these handicrafts passed on as it used to to the next generation, by letting more people know about what they are and the beauty behind these craftsmanship, Joyce believes they can be revitalized in some other form one day.
12/10/2018
Gold Song Talk
Gold Song Talk
This year marks the 40th anniversary of the “Top Ten Chinese Gold Songs Award”, the most long-lasting award ceremony for the Hong Kong pop music industry. We take this opportunity to produce “Gold Song Talk”, and invite various eminent singers to visit different university campuses to have face-to-face interactions with students. They will reminisce about their music journeys and look forward to the future of the local pop music scene, as well as to share their life wisdom as veterans in the music industry. “Band Sound” has never been the mainstream in the Hong Kong pop music industry. Yet, Hong Kong bands can make miracles from time to time by creating touching music pieces. Their work breaks through the ingrained mindsets of the people in town, therefore an essential element in promoting the development of the local music scene. The theme for this episode is “Hong Kong Super Band.Spirit of Beyond” while the prominent and influential band Beyond is invited. Its member WONG Ka-keung pays his visit to Hong Kong Baptist University to share his experiences as a band member with over 300 students. From each and every classic of Beyond, to the thick and thin that the band has gone through, he will talk about them one by one. Another hotshot band Dear Jane is also invited. The band is comprised of vocalist Tim, guitarist Howie, bass guitarist Jackal and drummer Nice. People who play in a band in Hong Kong must have tasted the sweets and bitters of life, as well as the fickleness of human nature. When the ideal did not match the reality, how did they manage to persist and keep on with no regrets with the spirit of rock and roll? The four members will even perform the Beyond x Dear Jane Special Medley in order to bring the spirit of rock music to each and every student on the spot. Apart from “Super Band”, special guest Mr CHEUNG Man-sun, the then-Assistant Director of Broadcasting who is called the “Father of Gold Songs”, will appear in this episode. Mr CHEUNG had worked in the radio station for years, during which he launched the “Top Ten Chinese Gold Songs Award” and has witnessed the ups and downs of the local music scene. He will share with us one by one the hot trend of forming bands in the 80s; how Beyond begin from being anonymous to start having a little fame, then turned from being the “betrayers of rock music” to a band which was well-received by the audience, and finally raised to become a prestigious and legendary rock music group. Host: WONG Tin-yee

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18/10/2018
Money Talk
Money Talk
The Fed looks set to defy Donald Trump and continue raising interest rates. The minutes of the central bank’s September monetary policy meeting show a unanimous decision to raise rates by 25bps with several members seeing a need to continue raising rates beyond the long-run level. The US Treasury department has backed away from naming China as a currency manipulator in its latest report on the currency practices of its foreign trade partners. No country was designated a currency manipulator, but China remains on the watch list along with Japan, South Korea, India, Germany and Switzerland. The US says it intends to negotiate three separate trade agreements with Japan, the UK and the EU. However, trade discussions with the EU to eliminate trade barriers on non-automotive industrial goods, following an agreement between Donald Trump and European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker over the summer, have hit a roadblock with both sides accusing the other of dragging their feet. The US said it would negotiate a free trade agreement with the UK as soon as it leaves the EU. However, Brexit negotiations are deadlocked, and European Council President Donald Tusk said he had "no grounds for optimism." UK Prime Minister Theresa May addressed the EU27 leaders in Brussels last night but had no new proposals over how to avoid a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic. On Money Talk we’re joined by our regular commentator and personal wealth advisor, Enzio von Pfeil along with Jack Siu from Credit Suisse. On the phone from Taipei is Ross Feingold, senior advisor for D.C. International Advisory.

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