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    劇情

    STORY

    監製:Lee Nga Yun, Shirley

    11/08/2017
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    It’s not easy for people in foreign land to adapt to a different culture. Three husbands from the West left home for Hong Kong because of their wives, which sounds as romantic as in love films. After the romance is gone, however, there are a lot of problems to be dealt with in the reality of married life. Is “love” the solution for these three inter-racial marriages?

    Twenty odd years ago, John, a British native, met Persis in his home country, who was travelling there. They married and moved to Hong Kong, and till now they have been living here together for 25 years. Now John can speak fluent Cantonese, and is teaching Linguistics in a university. John sets high standards for his teaching career because he has a sense of mission for this place. John’s determination to make his home in Hong Kong is obvious enough.

    Andy comes from a tiny city in Germany. He has been in Hong Kong for two years, and is now working hard on learning Cantonese. In order to speed up Andy’s progress in learning the dialect, his wife Tracy even arranges her parents to hang around so that he has more exposure to the dialect in terms of speaking and listening. To assimilate on foreign soil, one has to embrace the unique local culture, which is of utmost importance. Fortunately, Andy is not alone when adapting to all these new things to him. He has the company of Tracy.

    Brett comes from Canada. The time he has spent in Hong Kong is comparatively short. He met his wife Saron in Hong Kong, got married, and gave birth to a daughter who is now one year old. Speaking not a word of Cantonese, he did have struggles about adapting to her social circle. After their daughter was born, the couple had different views on how to bring up the kid, as one did it the Western way and the other the traditional Hong Kong way. In the end, it is communication and compromise that won the day. From another point of view, the appearance of Brett has also brought about subtle changes in Saron’s relationship with her folk, and the changes are all positive.


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Second Home

      Second Home

      Nischaya and Neivda are brother and sister who study in P.2 and P.3 respectively. After they were born in Nepal, their father brought them to Hong Kong. In November last year, the two went back to their hometown in Nepal for the first time. Although the simplicity in their hometown has excited their curiosity, it is still difficult for the two who were raised in Hong Kong to get used to the lifestyle there.

      Their father wants the two to attain proficiency in Chinese, so that they will not need to make a living through labour-intensive works like him. Learning Chinese is essential in entering into mainstream society, but as a father, he also wants his children to learn in joy without infinite stress and worries over school reports, such affection is replete with both contradictions and love.

      Swatica, with her outstanding academic results, chooses to learn Chinese for the sake of her future, but she also makes this decision to help translate for her mother who knows almost nothing about the Chinese language. Such a clever and precocious girl she is.

      These two cases reflect different values. Please listen to the voice of the children.

      08/09/2017
    • She ain't different from me

      She ain't different from me

      Some ethnic minorities find it hard to make a living or find a job because of language or cultural barriers. However, there are some of them who are proficient in Chinese but still toil and moil simply because of their skin colour.

      Diversity and openness are always highlighted in Hong Kong, so that ethnic minorities can play more roles in the society, among which is Maggie with Pakistani descent. Maggie is now an Officer of Correctional Services who serves at the Lo Wu Correctional Institution as an area-in-charge officer. She speaks fluent Cantonese because she was born in Hong Kong. She was abandoned by her parents when she was three months old at an orphanage and was adopted by a Hong Kong family when she was three. She has never come into contact with her biological parents and she knows nothing about Pakistani culture. She had been studying in mainstream schools in Hong Kong since her childhood with no difference between her and other Chinese children besides her appearance. However, she was always regarded as an “alien” and taunted by others because of her skin colour.

      Maggie cannot bear to think of the past, but her bitter childhood has pushed Maggie further in studies. Eventually, she was admitted into the Chinese University of Hong Kong and returned to her old school and worked as a teacher after graduation. Maggie joined the Correctional Services Department a year ago as a challenge to herself. She has won the trust of ethnic minority inmates because of the Pakistani appearance, but she cannot speak or understand their languages. To better understand her own origin and ethnic history, Maggie is now studying Pakistani and Pakistani culture in hope of helping the Pakistanis in Hong Kong when her studies come to fruition.

      01/09/2017
    • Thai Beauty

      Thai Beauty

      In 1980s and 90s, a lot of Thai females moved to Hong Kong as cross-border brides. Here, they ran into problems arising from language barriers and unfamiliarity with the people and the culture here. Problems about communication and adaptation were no new stories for them. Some of these Thai females chose to break through the barriers, some chose to embrace the course of nature. Various stories have grown out of them.

      It is definitely not easy to adapt to an environment that is totally strange, although a new environment may provide new opportunities. Tse Kwai-fong, a Thai Chinese, launched her new life in Hong Kong in the 1980’s, and since then has grabbed every business opportunity along the ebb and flow of the local economy. When the airport was relocated to Chek Lap Kok in 1998 and when Hong Kong was hard stricken by SARS later on, many people turned pessimistic about the prospects of Kowloon City, and quite a few shops there closed down. In times of adversity, however, Tse Kwai-fong dared to go against all the odds and launched her career in Kowloon City.

      Another Thai bride May arrived in Hong Kong by marriage at the age of 29. Being a total stranger here, she shared her parents-in-law’s accommodation in a public housing estate. Because of her different background and personal habits, she did not go along with the in-laws. She sulked every day. She even developed a hatred for Hong Kong and the people here. In these adverse circumstances, she was lucky to have the support of a loving husband, on which she struggled to survive. When their second daughter was born, the doctor suspected that she might be blind, which came as a great blow on May and her husband. The whole family even emigrated to Thailand. Later, in order to enable her daughter to receive better medical benefits, the family moved back here.

      Survivors of so many disasters as they were, the couple did not give up on life. For the sake of their daughter, they coped with life even in a more positive way, in an attempt to provide their daughter with the best things and solve their problems one by one. May’s husband decided to take early retirement to have more time for family. May and her family also moved out of her in-laws’ flat and settled in their own place, which lightened the burden on May’s emotions a lot. She lived happier than before. It was quite out of May’s expectations that her daughter’s disability, which was a tragedy at the beginning, stirred up her determination to live better. As a result, she lived more positively, keeping herself busy with activities related to religious organisations and social affairs; gradually, her social circle expanded and she became more cheerful. She started to like Hong Kong and the people here. That someone who had been cheering her up and supporting her by her side was her kind and gentle husband.

      Now the three daughters have grown up. Everyone in the family cares about each other, talks to each other about their feelings, and sings together. This family, which has been built in Hong Kong, has become the most important thing in May’s life.

      25/08/2017
    • I think, so I'm here

      I think, so I'm here

      By mastering Cantonese since his childhood, WEI Ching-duck, a Nepalese boy, has made his integration into Hong Kong much easier and he has also completed all secondary science programmes with good grades. However, he has not grown complacent. WEI Ching-duck likes to ponder over the logic of life and hence study of Philosophy. He has also joined the debate team in university to enhance his skills in critical thinking and exposition. Moreover, he plans to become a civil servant or a politician in the future with a single motive behind, that is, he wants to encourage more adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds to strive for better development in Hong Kong through his personal experience.

      As a Nepalese, WEI Ching-duck knows more about social issues in Hong Kong than many locals, and he is also more outspoken. In addition, he believes the responsibility of helping his fellow ethnic minorities rests on his shoulders, thus he has grown up participating in many voluntary works in assistance of ethnic minorities. Although WEI Ching-duck was not born in Hong Kong, he was raised here. With a face similar to that of Chinese, it is hard to tell that he is Nepalese when he walks among his schoolmates and friends. As a music lover, he loves to perform on the street at the waterfront with his old friends. He strums his guitar and sings “Boundlessness” out loud through his amplifier. If he were to metaphorise the song for Hong Kong and ethnic minorities, what would he want to express?

      Since the debate competition is closing in, the frequent strategic meetings come day after day. As the team captain in the face of challenges from other institutions, WEI Ching-duck believes that guiding his teammates to excellent cooperation and fulfilling his duties mean more than the result of the competition. WEI Ching-duck hopes to boost his self-confidence through the challenges encountered in university, so that he can set an example to other ethnic minorities to climb up the social ladder.

      18/08/2017
    • Happy Together

      Happy Together

      It’s not easy for people in foreign land to adapt to a different culture. Three husbands from the West left home for Hong Kong because of their wives, which sounds as romantic as in love films. After the romance is gone, however, there are a lot of problems to be dealt with in the reality of married life. Is “love” the solution for these three inter-racial marriages?

      Twenty odd years ago, John, a British native, met Persis in his home country, who was travelling there. They married and moved to Hong Kong, and till now they have been living here together for 25 years. Now John can speak fluent Cantonese, and is teaching Linguistics in a university. John sets high standards for his teaching career because he has a sense of mission for this place. John’s determination to make his home in Hong Kong is obvious enough.

      Andy comes from a tiny city in Germany. He has been in Hong Kong for two years, and is now working hard on learning Cantonese. In order to speed up Andy’s progress in learning the dialect, his wife Tracy even arranges her parents to hang around so that he has more exposure to the dialect in terms of speaking and listening. To assimilate on foreign soil, one has to embrace the unique local culture, which is of utmost importance. Fortunately, Andy is not alone when adapting to all these new things to him. He has the company of Tracy.

      Brett comes from Canada. The time he has spent in Hong Kong is comparatively short. He met his wife Saron in Hong Kong, got married, and gave birth to a daughter who is now one year old. Speaking not a word of Cantonese, he did have struggles about adapting to her social circle. After their daughter was born, the couple had different views on how to bring up the kid, as one did it the Western way and the other the traditional Hong Kong way. In the end, it is communication and compromise that won the day. From another point of view, the appearance of Brett has also brought about subtle changes in Saron’s relationship with her folk, and the changes are all positive.

      11/08/2017
    • The Double Life of Bangladesh Women

      The Double Life of Bangladesh Women

      Currently, less than 2 000 Bangladeshi natives live in Hong Kong. Some of them arrived in Hong Kong twenty or thirty years back for employment and made their home in Hong Kong, and now they have the right of abode in Hong Kong. Some of them are family or offspring of the aforesaid people, and some have just arrived in Hong Kong waiting to be screened and certified as refugees. They make up only 5% of the Indian population living in Hong Kong; they are viewed as the minority of ethnic minorities in Hong Kong.

      Shormi Ahmed, aged 28 this year, came to Hong Kong from Bangladesh with her mother and elder sister in 1999 to join her father and build a new life in Hong Kong; her father had already arrived in Hong Kong in the early 1990’s to operate a business in import and export. In Hong Kong, she went through secondary school without any exposure to the Chinese language; even though she had classmates who were local people, she was still assigned to a class particularly set up for ethnic minorities from India, Pakistan, the Philippines, etc., so her exposure to the Chinese language and local Chinese people was minimal.

      After going through twists and turns, Shormi, a fervent lover of the arts, was admitted to the Faculty of Arts of The University of Hong Kong to major in Art and Comparative Literature. From then on, she had more opportunities to get in touch with local young people and their communities, and she was gradually introduced to the literature and artworks from different places around the world and related people; one of them, an alumnus of the Faculty of Arts of HKU like her, she greatly adores: Eileen Chang. Even though Shormi does not write and read Chinese too well, she manages to understand the world of Eileen Chang through English translations.

      In the works of Eileen Chang, females are destined for a tragic life. The female in those times were manipulated by traditions and a male-centred society; they had no choice over their destiny and the way they lived, all under the same circumstances that Shormi might have been subject to if she had remained in Bangladesh; then she would have been made by her parents to enter into a marriage and bear children; in short, she would have followed the tradition of Bangladeshi females. None of these possibilities has come true on Shormi, thanks to her becoming a “Hongkonger”. Currently, she is putting a lot of effort into art administration; she hopes to discover more opportunities in the domains of art and life.

      04/08/2017