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監製:Chung Ka Wai


10 documentaries telling the stories of social marginal people in Hong Kong. These people belong to the minority groups who may have material deprivation, limited social participation, insufficient access to social resources, and may even lack of normative integration in the society. However, they do not give up and able to find their own places and go their ways.

最新

LATEST
10/10/2018
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Sho (Shouryu LEUNG), who was born a female, always has had a rather masculine personality ever since she could remember. She hated wearing skirts but loved playing robots and swordsmanship. As she was still too young back in the days, she did not ponder on her behaviours, thoughts, and sexuality. In the 80’s when she grew up, there were not many who talked about topics such as “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”, and her relationship with parents was rather estranged, that was why she could not find anyone to confide in. While recalling her puberty, Sho remembers the many awkward situations which she encountered – “My body was maturing back then, and I needed to wear female underwear which was a very unpleasant thing for me.”

After entering secondary school, Sho had begun wearing unisex clothing and had started to grow her interest in the opposite sex. Fortunately, people usually do not gaze oddly at female who put on unisex clothing in the modern society. However, deep down in Sho’s heart, she could not help but wonder “What is my real gender?”, “Am I a lesbian if I like girls?”. Yet, the answers never emerged at the time.

After treading through a period when she doubted her sexuality, Sho then jumped from being a secondary student to an undergraduate and acquainted with a group of friends who enthused about theatre, after which she began expanding her social circle. In 2013, she wrote a script about “gender identity” by which she gained a better understanding of herself and determined that she be a “He”. In the same year, she decided to make a momentous step in life - she visited a psychiatrist and had undergone a psychiatric assessment to seriously consider whether or not she would take a transsexual operation. “I did not know whether I would eventually complete the entire operation because there were so many things at stake, but I was sure that it was a significant experience for me to find myself.”

Since 2013, Sho has undergone psychiatric and psychological assessments, medication and surgeries. During those days, Sho worked as a Japanese language teacher. Not only did she worry about how changing sex would affect her job as well as the relationship with her students, but what worried for most was how to confess to her mother.

Today, although her gender on the Hong Kong identity card remind unchanged, the “He” chooses to live as a transsexual, where would “His” way of life lead?

Producer: Joan Fong
Assistant Producer: Jasper Leung

預告

UPCOMING
17/10/2018
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By the coast between Yau Tong and Lam Tin in East Kowloon is a forgotten corner. It is the Cha Kwo Ling Village, which is more than a century old, located on the outskirts of the urban area. The main street in the village is now disorderly cramped with squatter huts and entangled cables among them. The partly overlapping rooftops leave only narrow slits of the sky to be seen. In addition, the lack of main sewers means that flushing water is not available in most of the huts; therefore, many villagers rely solely on the public toilet near the village’s entrance. Everything there gives an impression of a fringe community where time stands still.

About a century ago, Cha Kwo Ling Village was a major producer of high-quality granite and the home of many miners. The village had a population of over 10,000 in its heyday. As the mining industry lost its importance later on, the mines no longer exist even though you can still see the small hills. With only over a thousand residents in Cha Kwo Ling Village currently, there are merely several shops left on the main street. Among them is a cafe with the history of half a century. The décor inside is the same as it was fifty years ago, so upon walking into the cafe you feel as if you have travelled back to the 1960’s. The reason that keeps owner Uncle Keng and his wife running the old-fashioned cafe is to provide a place for fellow villagers to meet up.

WU Lai-shan’s family has been living in Cha Kwo Ling Village for four generations, she is witnessing the village’s decline. According to her, the government has been speaking of developing the village ever since she was a child but it has been all talk and no action. Lai-shan feels there is nothing she can do about it. Although the village seems deserted now, she is still devoted to working as a tour guide in the village, introducing visitors to the past days of glory in great details.

Having grown up in the village, the 18-year-old TUNG Kam-hei well understands how unsatisfactory the public facilities are in this fringe community. Even so, he does not wish the village to be demolished by the government. He only wishes that the village’s conditions can be improved, so that the only large-scale squatter area in Kowloon may be preserved as a witness of the history of Hong Kong.

Producer: Tom Chan
Assistant Producer: Dorothy Yip, Cindy Chan

重溫

CATCHUP
09 - 10
2018
RTHK 31
  • Over the Line, I Stride

    Over the Line, I Stride

    Sho (Shouryu LEUNG), who was born a female, always has had a rather masculine personality ever since she could remember. She hated wearing skirts but loved playing robots and swordsmanship. As she was still too young back in the days, she did not ponder on her behaviours, thoughts, and sexuality. In the 80’s when she grew up, there were not many who talked about topics such as “sexual orientation” and “gender identity”, and her relationship with parents was rather estranged, that was why she could not find anyone to confide in. While recalling her puberty, Sho remembers the many awkward situations which she encountered – “My body was maturing back then, and I needed to wear female underwear which was a very unpleasant thing for me.”

    After entering secondary school, Sho had begun wearing unisex clothing and had started to grow her interest in the opposite sex. Fortunately, people usually do not gaze oddly at female who put on unisex clothing in the modern society. However, deep down in Sho’s heart, she could not help but wonder “What is my real gender?”, “Am I a lesbian if I like girls?”. Yet, the answers never emerged at the time.

    After treading through a period when she doubted her sexuality, Sho then jumped from being a secondary student to an undergraduate and acquainted with a group of friends who enthused about theatre, after which she began expanding her social circle. In 2013, she wrote a script about “gender identity” by which she gained a better understanding of herself and determined that she be a “He”. In the same year, she decided to make a momentous step in life - she visited a psychiatrist and had undergone a psychiatric assessment to seriously consider whether or not she would take a transsexual operation. “I did not know whether I would eventually complete the entire operation because there were so many things at stake, but I was sure that it was a significant experience for me to find myself.”

    Since 2013, Sho has undergone psychiatric and psychological assessments, medication and surgeries. During those days, Sho worked as a Japanese language teacher. Not only did she worry about how changing sex would affect her job as well as the relationship with her students, but what worried for most was how to confess to her mother.

    Today, although her gender on the Hong Kong identity card remind unchanged, the “He” chooses to live as a transsexual, where would “His” way of life lead?

    Producer: Joan Fong
    Assistant Producer: Jasper Leung

    10/10/2018
  • A Hongkonger That Stands Out

    A Hongkonger That Stands Out

    While Margaret’s dark complexion and afro-textured hair do make her look completely like an African, she is indeed half Chinese and half African. She was born and raised in Hong Kong, fluent in Cantonese with a lifestyle no different from any other Hongkonger.

    Margaret’s father is of Nigerian descent and her mother is a Hong Kong local. Her father has encountered a lot of discrimination in the city, but Margaret never thought that she would too. During childhood, she was mocked and teased by classmates who called her “negro” and “afro-head”. In order to be accepted by peers, she had tried to straighten her hair and put on whitening face cream, appearing in a way that would fit in the majority.

    A life where African and Hong Kong cultures converge can sometimes be overwhelming for Margaret. Fortunately, with her encouraging teachers and close friends as well as her optimistic character, she managed to pull herself together, and even learnt to cheer herself up by creating artworks.

    Speaking of her future, Margaret’s family hopes she would be a policewoman, which is a stable job. Margaret, however, would like to be a fashion designer. She thought of being an obedient child who fulfills the expectation of her family and society. But the thought of giving up her own dream and wasting her potential in design has set her heart on breaking the ceiling society has for dark-skinned people, and on deciding her own future.

    Margaret may have attained this courage that allows her to face up to challenges from her mother, who died of illness. In Margaret’s childhood memories, her mother was always laughing heartily without fearing the ordeal brought by her illness, exhibiting the resilience in her. In Hong Kong, a city known for being an “international cosmopolis”, the dark-skinned races still seem to be treated unfairly. This resilience is precisely the most needed character for Margaret to rise to the challenges ahead.

    Producer: Lawrence Leung
    Assistant Producers: Mandy Kwok, Cindy Chan, Mok Wing-laam

    03/10/2018
  • Between Good and Evil

    Between Good and Evil

    FUNG To-sun, Sunny, who turned 64 this year, once set foot in the limbo between justice and evil. Sunny’s father was once a prison guard of the Correctional Services Department, and thus he was raised at the Staff Quarters near the Stanley Prison since childhood. He was imbibed with his parents’ strenuous disciplines and was always reminded to live surefootedly and steer clear of criminal matters. Sunny applied to become a police officer when he was 18, and he said that he had worked painstakingly and solved many cases. Regrettably, he failed to withstand temptation when he was stationed at Wan Chai and became a drug addict, after which he even received drug injections. Later, he even knowingly violated the law and stole coins in parking meters for buying drugs, for which he was eventually apprehended by his colleagues and ended his career as a police officer with his own hands. During his fall into drug addiction, he even tried to end his life thrice. In 1981, the 27-year-old Sunny decided to take gospel drug treatment and fell from a law enforcer to a drug rehabilitee under supervision.

    The anguish detoxification process granted Sunny with mixed feelings. After the detoxification, he was determined to help other drug rehabilitees. Therefore, he established a rehabilitation centre in Sai Kung in 1989 all by himself and during the 28 years since then, he has rescued numerous young people who fell into drug addiction. Although FUNG seems stern on the outside, every student and tutor in the rehabilitation centre can feel his love and care. Through witnessing the once drug-abusing young people getting back on track, Sunny also affirms that his efforts have not been spent in vain.

    Looking back on his life so far, Sunny realises that there is only a fine line between good and evil, and he is grateful that he managed to return from evil and become an good father respected by both his students and his daughters!

    Producer: Annie YAU
    Assistant Producer: Cindy CHAN

    26/09/2018
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