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監製:Lee Tze Leung


Synopsis

Late at night while most office workers and employees are lying comfortably in bed, sleeping and recuperating, so as to prepare for the coming day; a group of midnight workers are setting off their journeys in the dim light of night, and rendering services to the community.

Hong Kong is a cosmopolitan city that runs around the clock, and under the glittering light of this sleepless city, there are nightwalkers and those who work all night long for living, such as employees at container terminals and airports, taxi drivers, disciplined services staff, convenient store staff, waiters of 24-hour restaurants, and warehouse-keepers, security guards, cleaning workers and road maintenance workers working night shifts. We can see some of these jobs around us; yet, some of them are distant from us and unseen by many. However, when the sky is lighted up by the sunlight, these workers also walk off. Some of what they have achieved through their endeavours over the night dissipates with the shades of night, but some remain for us to enjoy in this bustling city during the day.

After all, this nocturnal lifestyle runs counter to the ordinary work-and-rest lifestyle, and the hardship from it is thus conceivable. For example, when everyone is gluing themselves in their warm beds in cold rainy nights, you have to work in cold weather with full attention, and this must be an upsetting experience; or your family and spouse work at day with routine completely different from yours, which leads to absence of mutual care, communication and solicitude, and this has to bring torment and loneliness.

For the group of workers specialises in midnight works, do they work under duress, or do they find amusement in such works? Are they the ones who are forgotten by the sun, or are they dream chasers who pursue their dreams along with the night? Are works toilsome every night or do pleasant surprises pop up once in a while? The nine episodes of “Midnight workers” will walk into the shades of night with you and explore the sorrows and joys of midnight workers.

最新

LATEST
23/08/2016

The Coldest Night

Ayub walks into a freezing cold store after putting on his cotton-padded coat and hair restraint. Every day from 10 p.m. until 7 a.m. the next day, Ayub works in this gigantic refrigerator with temperature below 4℃ where he packs crushed ice cubes into bags for sales. Such a frigid, hermetic and dark environment is ordinary in the eyes of Ayub, as he just wants to earn more money in support of his family.

 

Ayub is a Hong Kong resident of Pakistani descent. He has lived in Hong Kong for over two decades and has worked in many fields. Before he came to Hong Kong, Ayub used to work in Kuwait as an assistant building surveyor but warfare drove him back to his country. Then he married his wife who was born in Hong Kong, and eventually ended up living in Hong Kong.

 

When he first arrived, language barrier, unable to pursue further studies and inapplicable skills were the problems that followed. Ayub has worked as a construction site labourer, a carpet salesperson, etc. He has encountered situations where he needed to rely on friends’ supports when he was unemployed. Now, if one asks what kind of job Ayub wants, his answer would undoubtedly be “The toughest job with the highest pay.” The Muslim culture puts on his shoulders the absolute responsibility to support his wife and children, and he willingly takes on all the expenses of the other six family members along with the tuition fees of his five children all for his motto - “A true man never goes back on his words. Marriage and children come with the responsibility of family-rearing that one shall never elude.” These words come with unwavering credibility from Ayub’s mouth as he is a living example of such belief.

 

However, as a member of an ethnic minority, it is difficult to feed a family in a competitive place like Hong Kong. Shaoib, Ayub’s fellow countryman, is a university graduate in his early twenties with great command of oral English. He has also experienced the agony brought about by language and cultural barriers, which put ethnic minorities in predicament in the course of job-seeking. He is now working in a labour institution where he works at night to serve South Asians. Shaoib points out that the inability to read and write Chinese is equal to death sentence to South Asian job seekers, because they cannot understand any job advertisement, fill in any application form, nor take any test for artisan licences.

 

Ayub devoted himself in job-seeking with no avail, and the Labour Department was unable to help. Eventually, he has taken the night job in an ice-making plant referred by LI Ka-shu, a social worker from the same labour institution where Shaoib works for.

 

Working all night long has disturbed Ayub’s circadian rhythm. Every day after his heavy physical work, Ayub can only get three to four hours of sleep. However, Ayub knows that many of his fellow countrymen tend to work on nigh shift because they can find another part-time job at day, so as to pay the family bills. Ayub has already worked in the ice-making plant for two years, and his diligent and conscientious manner has gained the trust of his manager, Simon. Simon was doubtful about South Asian workers, but he has gradually developed recognition of such inter-cultural co-operation and has hired a few South Asian workers referred by Ayub afterward.

 

Nonetheless, as Ayub puts his shoulder to the wheel, the job has slowly taken a toll on Ayub as he grows older and a daytime job now suits him better. With the continuous attempt of Shaoib and Ka-shu, Ayub had finally found a job as a baggage handler at the airport. However, Ayub made the decision to turn down the job offer after three days of training. Although it was a daytime job, working in the apron area was more than toilsome for him. Moreover, the working hours were too long with long commute and low salary.

 

Ayub finds his way back to the cold night. Same as many other billowing members of ethnic minorities in this city, he is waiting for his prosperous dawn to come.

 

Producer: Hung Ka-wing

重溫

CATCHUP
07 - 08
2016
RTHK 31
  • The Coldest Night

    The Coldest Night

    Ayub walks into a freezing cold store after putting on his cotton-padded coat and hair restraint. Every day from 10 p.m. until 7 a.m. the next day, Ayub works in this gigantic refrigerator with temperature below 4℃ where he packs crushed ice cubes into bags for sales. Such a frigid, hermetic and dark environment is ordinary in the eyes of Ayub, as he just wants to earn more money in support of his family.

     

    Ayub is a Hong Kong resident of Pakistani descent. He has lived in Hong Kong for over two decades and has worked in many fields. Before he came to Hong Kong, Ayub used to work in Kuwait as an assistant building surveyor but warfare drove him back to his country. Then he married his wife who was born in Hong Kong, and eventually ended up living in Hong Kong.

     

    When he first arrived, language barrier, unable to pursue further studies and inapplicable skills were the problems that followed. Ayub has worked as a construction site labourer, a carpet salesperson, etc. He has encountered situations where he needed to rely on friends’ supports when he was unemployed. Now, if one asks what kind of job Ayub wants, his answer would undoubtedly be “The toughest job with the highest pay.” The Muslim culture puts on his shoulders the absolute responsibility to support his wife and children, and he willingly takes on all the expenses of the other six family members along with the tuition fees of his five children all for his motto - “A true man never goes back on his words. Marriage and children come with the responsibility of family-rearing that one shall never elude.” These words come with unwavering credibility from Ayub’s mouth as he is a living example of such belief.

     

    However, as a member of an ethnic minority, it is difficult to feed a family in a competitive place like Hong Kong. Shaoib, Ayub’s fellow countryman, is a university graduate in his early twenties with great command of oral English. He has also experienced the agony brought about by language and cultural barriers, which put ethnic minorities in predicament in the course of job-seeking. He is now working in a labour institution where he works at night to serve South Asians. Shaoib points out that the inability to read and write Chinese is equal to death sentence to South Asian job seekers, because they cannot understand any job advertisement, fill in any application form, nor take any test for artisan licences.

     

    Ayub devoted himself in job-seeking with no avail, and the Labour Department was unable to help. Eventually, he has taken the night job in an ice-making plant referred by LI Ka-shu, a social worker from the same labour institution where Shaoib works for.

     

    Working all night long has disturbed Ayub’s circadian rhythm. Every day after his heavy physical work, Ayub can only get three to four hours of sleep. However, Ayub knows that many of his fellow countrymen tend to work on nigh shift because they can find another part-time job at day, so as to pay the family bills. Ayub has already worked in the ice-making plant for two years, and his diligent and conscientious manner has gained the trust of his manager, Simon. Simon was doubtful about South Asian workers, but he has gradually developed recognition of such inter-cultural co-operation and has hired a few South Asian workers referred by Ayub afterward.

     

    Nonetheless, as Ayub puts his shoulder to the wheel, the job has slowly taken a toll on Ayub as he grows older and a daytime job now suits him better. With the continuous attempt of Shaoib and Ka-shu, Ayub had finally found a job as a baggage handler at the airport. However, Ayub made the decision to turn down the job offer after three days of training. Although it was a daytime job, working in the apron area was more than toilsome for him. Moreover, the working hours were too long with long commute and low salary.

     

    Ayub finds his way back to the cold night. Same as many other billowing members of ethnic minorities in this city, he is waiting for his prosperous dawn to come.

     

    Producer: Hung Ka-wing

    23/08/2016
  • Songs Lover

    Songs Lover

    It is the job of Lan and Wing to help their customers destress by listening to their music and songs, thereby allowing them to enjoy a convivial evening.

     

    Ever since she was invited on stage to sing during her visit to Temple Street with her co-workers thirty years ago for music, Lan, who has been studying Cantonese Opera in the Mainland since her childhood, has turned from an audience to a performer. Lan has lived through the heyday of the Temple Street as well as its trough brought upon by SARS. Lan, as a singing devotee, never stop singing even though the number of her customers is dwindling. She has been going out at noon and returning late at night every day for more than thirty years. She was not able to accompany her son as he grew which has become her greatest regret. As such, no matter how toilsome she was, she still strived to send her son to study abroad. Fortunately, her son shows understanding for her absence. Now, her son visits her every night before returning home from work.

     

    Wing, a resident singer of a bar in her early thirties, has also set out her singing career after being invited on stage to sing in a bar. When she entered this trade eight years ago, many doyens had already explained to her that this trade was on the wane. Although she has gained outstanding results in myriad of singing competitions in Hong Kong and the Mainland, the self-proclaimed unsociable Wing rather continues working as a resident singer in a bar. She has been molested by drunk customers; and she has also hurt her eardrum in an unfortunate accident in the bar. The relationship between Wing and her father has plummeted to rock bottom by these but she still holds on to her singing career and resists leaving her stage.

     

    Although it is difficult to find someone who resonates, at least the love for music can be found in the singers’ hearts. On this stage of the night, the two only wish to keep singing.

    Producer: Yu Chi-ling

    16/08/2016
  • Night Flight

    Night Flight

    The Hong Kong International Airport may be the busiest place in Hong Kong at night.

     

    Every year, tens of thousands of aircraft land or take off in Hong Kong. To make sure that every aircraft takes off safely, WAN Kwok-fai [transliteration], an aircraft maintenance engineer, has to check each aircraft carefully. Required to work by shift, Fai often deals with freighters in transit at night. When an aircraft has landed, Fai’s first job is to walk around the aircraft once, to check carefully if there are traces of damage on the surface of the aircraft. And then he has to visit the cockpit to read the flying log book and communicate with the pilot, to ascertain whether there was anything abnormal during the flight. If abnormalities are spotted, Fai has to identify the causes immediately, and then decide the extent of the problem’s impact on the aircraft’s continued flying. He also has to discuss this with the airline to decide if an emergency repair is needed. This job involves the expertise and decision-making power that make it incomparable with most other jobs. No matter what factors he considers, safety is always on the top of his priority list.

     

    Chen Zhou, a new immigrant from Mainland China, arrived in Hong Kong after finishing high school there. Then his command of English was really bad. When he started learning to do aircraft maintenance, he had to refer to a thick stack of reading materials, all written in English. Not only did he have no intention to give up, he even felt elated. He was determined to finish the training even if he had to look up every word in the dictionary. Now he has finally become an aircraft maintenance craftsman; every day he repairs various parts of aircraft using different tools.

     

    Chen Zhou’s wife was once his classmate. She is a university graduate and she comes from a quite well-off background. They have a small daughter. Mrs. Chen, who speaks no Cantonese, finds it difficult to adjust to so much change that has happened in such a short time. Worse still, Chen Zhou’s job, which includes frequent night shifts, makes it impossible for him to stay keep her company often. Therefore, Mrs. Chen always wants him to give up his job in Hong Kong and go back to the Mainland together. As Chen Zhou has fallen in love with aircraft maintenance, he is still juggling hard between career and family.

     

    Producer: Au Ta-hoi

    09/08/2016
  • Midnight Fighters

    Midnight Fighters

    In Cantonese, “eating porridge at night” means learning martial arts.

    In the old days, the economy did not flourish like nowadays, and crime was rampant. To learn martial arts was simply a way to protect oneself.

    Some people worked in the day for a small salary, and then practised boxing in the evening until late night.

    Hungry boxing students got a bowl of porridge from the wives of their masters. The students were warmed all the way into their hearts.

     

    Master Ray remembers his deceased master James Yuen and the difficult days of learning boxing. He is still thankful.

    Good masters produce good boxers. James Yuen Boxing Club has produced numerous champions, both in Hong Kong and overseas.

    Among them, it is Chan Kam-sun, Master Ray’s junior classmate, he misses the most. Chan is a legendary boxer and the pride of Hong Kong.

    This legendary boxer, whom he thinks was most hard-working, serious and talented in the boxing circle, died suddenly in 2010.

    In those days, Chan had to work as a butcher in the days to provide for the family; at night, after practising, he had to go jogging for further body training until midnight. He returned home and dropped in bed at once. That was how he finished a day.

    Master Ray complains that boxers nowadays cannot endure the kind of training he used to go through. They may not be able to endure hardship, and they are now living in a different social setting, with long working hours and immense pressure from work. Today, it is not easy to ask young people to be committed to tough training.

     

    Pang Tsz-kin is a student of one of Master Ray’s students. He is about to meet this challenge.

     

    He is now 23 years old, with five years of boxing experience and a record of seven matches already. He will not content himself with being a mediocre boxer.

    His family has a grudge against his boxing; his girlfriend does not welcome the sight of bruises on his face.

    His persistence even surprised his master Yuen Wan-pang. It is indeed very rare for a young person to achieve that much nowadays.

     

    Yuen Wan-pang, a nine-time local boxing champion, is the son of Master James Yuen, and an exemplary student of Master Ray.

     

    Talents do not worry about not being spotted. Even though they are renting a small flat with other boxing clubs in an obscure industrial building in Kwun Tong, people still rush in to learn boxing from them. The corridors in this industrial building are particularly “macho” at this hour in the evening.

    The training is very demanding. Because of psychological factors and the pressure from his day-time job, Tsz-kin has lost three matches in a row.

    On his way home after practice, Tsz-king asks himself again and again: “What do I get in exchange for such long hours of practice?”

     

    This time, he hopes to achieve something.

     

    One month before the match, he quit his full-time job to devote himself exclusively to practice.

    In the future, he hopes to become a professional boxing trainer even though he may not become a professional boxer.

     

    ***

     

    Nowadays, boxing has developed into a sport for stress relief. Master Ray runs a boxing gym in Central. The gym is air-conditioned, with extravagant facilities. Most important of all, safety is the number one priority.

     

    Yet, Master Ray misses the days of the old-fashioned boxing club, where students practised in heavy sweat. He misses the days when the classmates were so close to each other and supported each other like brothers. The memories are as endearing as his native place.

     

    In Master Ray’s gym, there is one boxer training in silence.

    He is Tso Sing-yeung, a former member of the boxing team representing Hong Kong and four-time local champion.

    Sing-yeung is currently chief boxing coach of that boxing gym. Having retired from his capacity as boxer many years ago, he made a comeback to the boxing ring in June this year and defeated a boxer from Korea who was a lot younger.

    Because of his age and that fact that he had been out of training for such a long time, he had a tough time preparing for the match. On top of that, he had to teach boxing in the day and train in the night, which was taxing on his stamina. His hardship was beyond words.

    The weight-losing diet worsened his temper.

     

    Was it for fame? He had it a long time ago. Was it for fortune? To prepare for the match, he had to cut down on teaching jobs, thereby reducing his income.

     

    So, what was he fighting for?

     

    Tso Sing-yeung’s father is Master Tso Shu-yan, a first-generation local boxer and seven-time local champion.

    The senior Master Tso has four sons, who are all boxers since childhood.

    Among them, it was Sing-yeung who was the first one to rise to fame.

    Surprising, the one who has become the most famous is the youngest son, Tso Sing-yu, a professional boxer who is about to challenge the world champion.

    In fact, in the senior Master Tso’s mind, he is already satisfied with his sons’ achievements.

    Watching Sing-yeung practise every night to prepare for his way back to the ring next year, his old father is both happy and sad.

     

    ***

     

    Tsz-kin has a special love for the last five kilometres of the route beginning from Kwun Tong and ending in Wong Tai Sin as he jogs home after his boxing practice.

    It is already in the still of the night as he jogs home.

    He does not disturb anyone, nor does he have to care about being watched.

    All he has to do is concentrate, concentrate and concentrate.

    In the still of the night, it is time for him to work harder to improve his weaknesses. This applies on students who burn the midnight oil, grass roots who work overtime to earn extra money, and athletes who strive for constant improvement.

     

    That night, there is an “unofficial game” in Central.

    Tsz-kin, still green in the sport, seeks instruction from the much more experienced Sing-yeung.

    Unofficial as the match is, Sing-yeung still tries his best to drill Tsz-kin. He still remembers that the most disastrous defeat he has ever suffered was brought about by an exemplary student of Master Yuen Wan-pang.

    Master Ray has indeed great fun watching a boxing game between his colleague and the student of his own student.

     

    The contestants, each from a different generation, compliment each other after the game.

     

    In the long night, everyone has a different reason for sweating.

     

    In our lives, we have our own race which we don’t want to lose.

     

    The game in early December is drawing near. Whether Tsz-kin will win or not depends solely on how he adjusts his mentality.

     

    Once in the ring, one can rely on oneself and no one else.

     

    Tsz-kin murmurs this to himself every day.

     

    Producer: Hung Ka-wing

    02/08/2016
  • Masters of night

    Masters of night

    Three young persons with different ideas met in a café at night with different reasons. They choose to work at night and colour the dark night with another lifestyle.

     

    Night means coffee, food, giving and sharing.

     

    AK is a multi-media producer.

    When night falls and the amber light at the café’s door is up, he morphs into a chef and waits for acquainted or new customers to walk in. He prepares all kinds of food personally for the customers which allows them to savour his food slowly and take their time while indulging in chit-chat together without being rushed even when midnight approaches. The price he sets is “Zero” as he hopes to share and communicate with customers through food and “Free Pricing” which allows them to pay at will and take a new look at the cash consumption pattern. He also discusses the concept of “Free Pricing” with customers and tells them that cash is not the only option for payment, barter and labour are also viable payment options. Some people even trade their clothes for a cup of coffee or a plate of spaghetti.

     

    Night means tattoo, drawing and dreams.

     

    Big-dog is a tattooist, a painter and a hand-made accessories designer.

    Her paintings cover the walls in the café and the loft.

    With a background in Arts, she used to work as a photojournalist. She is enthralled by drawing and tattoo and thus she has given up her full-time job at day to work as a tattooist. She also hand makes accessories for sales in flea markets. She met AK in the café where she talked about her dreams while sipping a cup of coffee. In the café, she usually helps AK to clean and tidy up and pay her rent by labour in exchange for borrowing the café’s loft, where she tattoos her customers with her own designed patterns. At night, she draws and designs tattoo patterns in the loft. In this room, she records the dreams she creates.

     

    Night means rings, metallic smells and choices.

     

    Aikary is a goldsmith.

    She specialises in hand-making sterling silver jewellery with traditional goldsmithing skills. However, she used to hate the metallic smell.

    Her family has worked as ironmongers for four generations but she refused to take on the mantle. She majored in psychology in university and had found an office job after graduation. However, she found out that she was not fond of such monotonous nine-to-five job and she had also failed to find her cause for life in this. Therefore, she chose to sojourn in Taiwan for three months and learn a kind of local craftsmanship during her stay.

    She liked tailor-made products, and after consideration, she had chosen to learn goldsmithing.

    She had slowly developed an interest in goldsmithing and hoped to take on the family’s mantle after coming back to Hong Kong. However, the ironmonger’s store had to wind up the business because of land resumption for urban renewal.

    She then began searching for a studio and had finally settled down in the café’s loft.

    Under the amber light at night, she forges pairs after pairs of rings for couples. During the annealing process using torch igniter, she teaches students to use fire to soften the silver. They forge the ideal shapes for their rings in the tinkling sounds during the beating process. She insists in hand-made production because she believes such products “release the producers’ spirit injected and exude a gleam of warmth out of such cold metal”.

     

    Producer: Yeung King-chuen

    26/07/2016
  • Mall Decorators

    Mall Decorators

    When night falls and shops inside the mall close while visitors leave one by one, a group of people are preparing to rush into the mall to start their race against time, in the hope of putting a new look on the mall before it re-opens at dawn.

     

    Cynthia, who calls herself in a self-mocking way a “born workaholic”, worked in the public relations industry before she switched to mall decoration projects. For this new career, she started from scratch with much enthusiasm. She gives most of her time to work. Although she works more than ten hours every day around the clock, it helps her find her purpose. Moreover, with the moral support of her family, she is free to pursue her dream.

     

    Chris, who also works in mall decoration projects, is fond of night-time tranquil even though he is required to work at night. It helps him put aside the hectic lifestyle during the day and organise his thoughts, so that he can plan his future.

     

    In fact, working throughout the night might not be cumbersome; it may as well be a lifestyle by choice.

     

    These two “cosmeticians of the mall”, who devote themselves wholeheartedly to their interests and ideals, work for the beauty of their dreams as well as of the mall.

     

    Producer: Pang Chi-man

    19/07/2016
  • On Call

    On Call

    Public hospitals that operate around the clock are brightly lit at night.

     

    As a surgeon, Shannon (Dr. Shannon-Melissa CHAN) has to work on night shifts from time to time. Strictly speaking, her working hours go beyond the evenings as she works ceaselessly day and night for over thirty hours during which an empty stomach is usually in tow for more than ten hours.

     

    At night time, manpower in public hospitals is less compared to that at any time. Take the Department of Surgery which Shannon belongs to as an example, there are approximately 120 in-patients under the care of merely three duty doctors without even taking into account the number of patients admitted for emergency treatment. All doctors have to perform surgeries, conduct ward rounds and carry out routine checks, with incessant duties in tandem. They also need to be on call at any time in case of emergencies.

     

    Dr. WU Chi-yuen (Justin) is a specialist doctor in Gastroenterology as well as a professor in the Department of Medicine and Therapeutics with over twenty years of experience as a medical practitioner, and he is now the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Medicine in the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Besides daily duties as a doctor, Justin also needs to perform clinical teaching, carry out medical research projects and take care of a mountain of managerial and administrative work, which make Justin work late into the night everyday just to handle the abovementioned work. If any complex cases come up, he has to go back to the hospital to help. No matter he is putting his daughter to sleep or dwelling in his dream, when his pager beeps, he must hurry back to the hospital. Weekends might not necessarily be holidays as he always needs to attend different conferences and academic exchange programmes overseas on behalf of the hospital or perform teaching tasks.

     

    Justin has to handle works in different areas but he is reluctant to drop any of them. As a doctor, clinical duties are naturally very significant, and taking care of patients personally always provides him with the greatest sense of satisfaction. However, he believes that works in other areas such as medical research, policy and education are integral parts of the long-term development in the healthcare sector, and he finds pleasure in making contribution.

     

    Producer: Fu Sze-chung

    12/07/2016
  • After the lights on

    After the lights on

    People need light in the dark. Street lights lit night as usual, the road dyed yellow. This usual scene at night, is maintenaced by a group of maintenance workers, who work each night no matter how bad is the weather.

    Zin Shing-kwan (Ah kwan) , drove a large lift truck across the road and the village, maintenance broken street lamp in a dark road. He starts working when the lights on and finshes when the lights off, that not only bring convenience for the driver, but also for the villagers to illuminate the way home.

    Harsh working environment, overnight working period that easily alienated with friends, and also have to give up his interest -football. But he has a belief, the more difficult job, the harder to be substituted be others. Ah kwan and his partner to take up more than 70,000 New Territories West branch street maintenance, accounting for nearly half the total number of Hong Kong (Hong Kong about 150 000).

    Car is also his workplace, while receiving emergency call for maintenece, and dispatching work to partner. Having all meals on board in a busy night. Fighting mentality, apart from the pressure of work, but also because of having a good future. He hopes to employ more workers, and set up a team to share his onerous duties.

    Recently a new comer Ah Bond join his team, well-prepared to change for better future. He worked in retail industry, but market conditions are not going well, so he hopes to learn a craft, to guarantee future life. However, apart from determination, repairing street lights have three basic requirements; not afraid of dark, not afraid of dogs, not afraid of high, but Ah bond cannot overcome these. Fortunately Ah kwan think that's not a big problem if he is a hardworking man. The technique is required to spend a long time to learn, but also let him slowly to suit the moment of fear.

    Old acquaintances, Ah kwan's friends make fun with him "He is not late only when he got married." But actually they are considerated and understanding the importance of his work. Meanwhile, the public is the occasional thank Ah kwan incentive to work, it can be considered for this "humble" work of care.

    Producer: Tsang Chor-sun

    05/07/2016
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