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    監製:CHENG WAI FONG


    Looking up at the sky, scientists are always curious about everything happening in our universe, and they strive to explore various scientific fields without cease. Through countless observations, assumptions and verifications, scientists have tried very hard to find out and summarise the natural phenomena, thereby understanding the rules therein, but at the same time, encounter more and more irregularities and uncertainties.

    In all these years, Hong Kong has nurtured numerous talents in the international arena of scientific research, who carry out innovative research projects in various fields of science in an endeavour to improve people’s lives. These scientists, including LEE Hun-wei (Environmental Hydraulics), LAM Hon-ming (Life Sciences), LO Yuk-ming (Molecular Genetics), Nancy IP (Neuroscience), KWOK Sun (Astronomy) and CHE Chi-ming (Inorganic Chemistry), spare no effort in making contributions to science. Despite countless failures, they still persist in the scientific researches which they have chosen. In the end, they make breakthroughs in their researches and benefit different people.

    In the six one-hour episodes of documentaries, we will explore the science world and get to know about the scientists’ spirit of constant pursuit and being brave to explore on the path of seeking knowledge. With this, we hope to arouse public concern and awareness for the importance of scientific research.

    最新

    LATEST
    27/03/2018

    Some say the science of chemistry dates back to the Stone Age when mankind first discovered fire. Early humans were fascinated by ways different objects react to burning, and developed the practice of alchemy. However, having failed to properly explain the transformations between states of matter, alchemy eventually gave way to modern chemistry. Over the years, the world of chemical substances and their myriad combinations have proved captivating to many, including Hong Kong chemist Che Chi-ming, who is determined to explore its unique allure.
    Che Chi-ming, the current Zhou Guangzhao Professor in Natural Sciences and Head of The Department of Chemistry, became the youngest Chair Professor in HKU history at age 35. He was also the youngest Academician and first scientist from Hong Kong at the time to be elected into the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as the first Hong Kong scientist to win the First Class prize of the State Natural Science Award – often dubbed “the Chinese Nobel Prize”.
    While these titles and accolades are testament to Professor Che’s accomplishments in scientific research and brought him fame, he gained the respect of his counterparts not only for his leadership in large research teams, but for his groundbreaking work in different arenas. An authority in both inorganic and organic chemistry, Che published in 1997 the first research report in the world on the conductive and fluorescent properties of metal-organic compounds. It paved the way for global developments in OLED, the technology deployed in mobile phones and TV displays by many world renowned brands. Meanwhile in Chinese medicine, when others are looking at the use of compound formulas to combat cancer, Professor Che would instead probe the use of single ingredients.
    Yet, a young Professor Che was once discouraged by his teachers from pursuing the study of chemistry because he did not perform well in experiments. Refusing to give up, Professor Che decided to turn his attention to designing chemical compounds and developing their applications. While engaging in postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, Che’s supervisor Harry Gray claimed that he “can make any compound you want”!
    Chemical experiments require focus, patience and commitment. If success means arriving at a particular conclusion, you might fail even after a thousand attempts. As with detective cases, you must get to the bottom of it all – if an ingredient manages to kill cancer cells, what is the exact cause and manner of death? How would other organs react? A long but rewarding inquisition ensues.
    While many people in their primes are already plotting their retirements, 60-year-old Professor Che feels that his golden age has just arrived. In chasing his dream, he believes Hong Kong can produce research standards to rival top-notch universities overseas.

    重溫

    CATCHUP
    01 - 03
    2018
    RTHK 31
    • Chemistry becomes Reality - Che Chi-ming (II)

      Chemistry becomes Reality - Che Chi-ming (II)

      Some say the science of chemistry dates back to the Stone Age when mankind first discovered fire. Early humans were fascinated by ways different objects react to burning, and developed the practice of alchemy. However, having failed to properly explain the transformations between states of matter, alchemy eventually gave way to modern chemistry. Over the years, the world of chemical substances and their myriad combinations have proved captivating to many, including Hong Kong chemist Che Chi-ming, who is determined to explore its unique allure.
      Che Chi-ming, the current Zhou Guangzhao Professor in Natural Sciences and Head of The Department of Chemistry, became the youngest Chair Professor in HKU history at age 35. He was also the youngest Academician and first scientist from Hong Kong at the time to be elected into the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as the first Hong Kong scientist to win the First Class prize of the State Natural Science Award – often dubbed “the Chinese Nobel Prize”.
      While these titles and accolades are testament to Professor Che’s accomplishments in scientific research and brought him fame, he gained the respect of his counterparts not only for his leadership in large research teams, but for his groundbreaking work in different arenas. An authority in both inorganic and organic chemistry, Che published in 1997 the first research report in the world on the conductive and fluorescent properties of metal-organic compounds. It paved the way for global developments in OLED, the technology deployed in mobile phones and TV displays by many world renowned brands. Meanwhile in Chinese medicine, when others are looking at the use of compound formulas to combat cancer, Professor Che would instead probe the use of single ingredients.
      Yet, a young Professor Che was once discouraged by his teachers from pursuing the study of chemistry because he did not perform well in experiments. Refusing to give up, Professor Che decided to turn his attention to designing chemical compounds and developing their applications. While engaging in postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, Che’s supervisor Harry Gray claimed that he “can make any compound you want”!
      Chemical experiments require focus, patience and commitment. If success means arriving at a particular conclusion, you might fail even after a thousand attempts. As with detective cases, you must get to the bottom of it all – if an ingredient manages to kill cancer cells, what is the exact cause and manner of death? How would other organs react? A long but rewarding inquisition ensues.
      While many people in their primes are already plotting their retirements, 60-year-old Professor Che feels that his golden age has just arrived. In chasing his dream, he believes Hong Kong can produce research standards to rival top-notch universities overseas.

      27/03/2018
    • Chemistry becomes Reality - Che Chi-ming (I)

      Chemistry becomes Reality - Che Chi-ming (I)

      Some say the science of chemistry dates back to the Stone Age when mankind first discovered fire. Early humans were fascinated by ways different objects react to burning, and developed the practice of alchemy. However, having failed to properly explain the transformations between states of matter, alchemy eventually gave way to modern chemistry. Over the years, the world of chemical substances and their myriad combinations have proved captivating to many, including Hong Kong chemist Che Chi-ming, who is determined to explore its unique allure.
      Che Chi-ming, the current Zhou Guangzhao Professor in Natural Sciences and Head of The Department of Chemistry, became the youngest Chair Professor in HKU history at age 35. He was also the youngest Academician and first scientist from Hong Kong at the time to be elected into the Chinese Academy of Sciences, as well as the first Hong Kong scientist to win the First Class prize of the State Natural Science Award – often dubbed “the Chinese Nobel Prize”.
      While these titles and accolades are testament to Professor Che’s accomplishments in scientific research and brought him fame, he gained the respect of his counterparts not only for his leadership in large research teams, but for his groundbreaking work in different arenas. An authority in both inorganic and organic chemistry, Che published in 1997 the first research report in the world on the conductive and fluorescent properties of metal-organic compounds. It paved the way for global developments in OLED, the technology deployed in mobile phones and TV displays by many world renowned brands. Meanwhile in Chinese medicine, when others are looking at the use of compound formulas to combat cancer, Professor Che would instead probe the use of single ingredients.
      Yet, a young Professor Che was once discouraged by his teachers from pursuing the study of chemistry because he did not perform well in experiments. Refusing to give up, Professor Che decided to turn his attention to designing chemical compounds and developing their applications. While engaging in postdoctoral research at the California Institute of Technology, Che’s supervisor Harry Gray claimed that he “can make any compound you want”!
      Chemical experiments require focus, patience and commitment. If success means arriving at a particular conclusion, you might fail even after a thousand attempts. As with detective cases, you must get to the bottom of it all – if an ingredient manages to kill cancer cells, what is the exact cause and manner of death? How would other organs react? A long but rewarding inquisition ensues.
      While many people in their primes are already plotting their retirements, 60-year-old Professor Che feels that his golden age has just arrived. In chasing his dream, he believes Hong Kong can produce research standards to rival top-notch universities overseas.

      20/03/2018
    • Beneath the Starry Sky - Kwok Sun (II)

      Beneath the Starry Sky - Kwok Sun (II)

      Professor Sun Kwok, a world-renowned local born astronomer, has been at the forefront in astronomical exploration in the past 40 years, searching for the latest answers in the most ancient science.
      His theory on the death of stars and his research on organic matter in space are groundbreaking discoveries that help explain the origin of life on Earth.
      Beneath the starry sky, here he provides the best tell stories of his own private cosmos.

      13/03/2018
    • Beneath the Starry Sky - Kwok Sun (I)

      Beneath the Starry Sky - Kwok Sun (I)

      Professor Sun Kwok, a world-renowned local born astronomer, has been at the forefront in astronomical exploration in the past 40 years, searching for the latest answers in the most ancient science.
      His theory on the death of stars and his research on organic matter in space are groundbreaking discoveries that help explain the origin of life on Earth.
      Beneath the starry sky, here he provides the best tell stories of his own private cosmos.

      06/03/2018
    • Meeting Neurons, and Thereafter - Nancy Ip (II)

      Meeting Neurons, and Thereafter - Nancy Ip (II)

      Professor Nancy IP is an internationally-acclaimed top neuroscientist, spending decades in researches related to the communication among neurons. She has made important contributions to our understanding of brain development and plasticity, as well as the causes of related neurological disorders. Professor Ip is highly respected for her outstanding discoveries in the biology of neurotrophic factors - proteins that promote the survival, development and maintenance of neurons. In particular, she has made extensive and dedicated enquiries into neu-rodegenerative diseases.
      Globally, the world is approaching an aging society, and Alzheimer’s disease has become a universal challenge. Professor Ip, in association with her team, dis-covered that the abnormal activation of a protein named EphA4 in neurons re-duces the communicative function among neurons, causing memory loss, as in Alzheimer’s. The team then identified a natural compound named rhynchophyl-line, found in the traditional Chinese medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jacks, which could inhibit the abnormal activation of EphA4. In lab experiments, they found that when mice with dementia were given rhynchophylline, there was a marked improvement in their memory. This was a breakthrough in medical treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.
      Professor Nancy Ip was born and educated in Hong Kong, before moving on for her university studies in biology and chemistry in the U.S. She acquired her Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School, which inspired her to take up a career in scientific research.
      Professor Ip was invited to take up a teaching and research position at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) in 1993, shortly after the University was established. She founded a research lab and grew her team from three to several dozens. Her Ip Lab is now a State Key Laboratory of China. It is Professor Ip’s belief that scientific research should not be a solitary pursuit, but rather a collaboration among talents and labs across disciplines. Over the years, she has built up a global network of research and scientific experts, drawing on the strengths and specialisation of different labs, such that information can be shared to enable better research results.
      It is estimated that globally there will be over 100 million Alzheimer’s patients by 2050, with nine million in China alone. Professor Ip has been actively involved in the “China Brain Project” to research into effective means of making early diag-nosis of neurodegenerative diseases and racial differences as a factor in Alz-heimer’s. She has been collaborating with medical doctors and scholars in Main-land China for studies of Alzheimer’s among Chinese, making use of big data in blood samples and related statistics. Such effort has also been instrumental in nurturing new talents in clinical and research-based medicine.
      The remarkable contributions of Professor Nancy Ip in neuroscience have been widely recognised. In 2004, she was awarded the L’OREAL-UNESCO for Wom-en in Science Award. In 2011, she was awarded the Honors for Women Innova-tors at the APEC Women and Economy Summit, and Chevalier de l'Ordre Na-tional du Merite, France. She is a recipient of the National Natural Science Award, China’s highest honour in the natural sciences. She was elected Acade-mician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2001, being then the youngest Academician on record. In 2015, she was elected a Foreign Member of the US National Academy of Sciences,
      and in 2016 a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Professor Ip is also a member of the Global Agenda Council on Brain Research of the World Economic Forum.
      Scientific research is a lifelong commitment to Professor Ip, upholding the spirit of objectivity, dedication, persistence, integrity and impregnability as a scientist. She hopes to emulate Dr. Levi-Montalcini, the Italian Nobel laureate and neurobiologist, and dedicate her entire life to scientific research, working for her ideal.
      Professor Ip is a scientist, educator and university administrator, as Vice-President of Research and Graduate Studies of the HKUST. She hopes to share her research legacy with students and fellow researchers, nurturing the next generation of scientists par excellence.

      Director: Leslie Ng

      27/02/2018
    • Meeting Neurons, and Thereafter - Nancy Ip (I)

      Meeting Neurons, and Thereafter - Nancy Ip (I)

      Professor Nancy IP is an internationally-acclaimed top neuroscientist, spending decades in researches related to the communication among neurons. She has made important contributions to our understanding of brain development and plasticity, as well as the causes of related neurological disorders. Professor Ip is highly respected for her outstanding discoveries in the biology of neurotrophic factors - proteins that promote the survival, development and maintenance of neurons. In particular, she has made extensive and dedicated enquiries into neu-rodegenerative diseases.
      Globally, the world is approaching an aging society, and Alzheimer’s disease has become a universal challenge. Professor Ip, in association with her team, dis-covered that the abnormal activation of a protein named EphA4 in neurons re-duces the communicative function among neurons, causing memory loss, as in Alzheimer’s. The team then identified a natural compound named rhynchophyl-line, found in the traditional Chinese medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jacks, which could inhibit the abnormal activation of EphA4. In lab experiments, they found that when mice with dementia were given rhynchophylline, there was a marked improvement in their memory. This was a breakthrough in medical treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.
      Professor Nancy Ip was born and educated in Hong Kong, before moving on for her university studies in biology and chemistry in the U.S. She acquired her Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School, which inspired her to take up a career in scientific research.
      Professor Ip was invited to take up a teaching and research position at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) in 1993, shortly after the University was established. She founded a research lab and grew her team from three to several dozens. Her Ip Lab is now a State Key Laboratory of China. It is Professor Ip’s belief that scientific research should not be a solitary pursuit, but rather a collaboration among talents and labs across disciplines. Over the years, she has built up a global network of research and scientific experts, drawing on the strengths and specialisation of different labs, such that information can be shared to enable better research results.
      It is estimated that globally there will be over 100 million Alzheimer’s patients by 2050, with nine million in China alone. Professor Ip has been actively involved in the “China Brain Project” to research into effective means of making early diag-nosis of neurodegenerative diseases and racial differences as a factor in Alz-heimer’s. She has been collaborating with medical doctors and scholars in Main-land China for studies of Alzheimer’s among Chinese, making use of big data in blood samples and related statistics. Such effort has also been instrumental in nurturing new talents in clinical and research-based medicine.
      The remarkable contributions of Professor Nancy Ip in neuroscience have been widely recognised. In 2004, she was awarded the L’OREAL-UNESCO for Wom-en in Science Award. In 2011, she was awarded the Honors for Women Innova-tors at the APEC Women and Economy Summit, and Chevalier de l'Ordre Na-tional du Merite, France. She is a recipient of the National Natural Science Award, China’s highest honour in the natural sciences. She was elected Acade-mician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2001, being then the youngest Academician on record. In 2015, she was elected a Foreign Member of the US National Academy of Sciences,
      and in 2016 a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Professor Ip is also a member of the Global Agenda Council on Brain Research of the World Economic Forum.
      Scientific research is a lifelong commitment to Professor Ip, upholding the spirit of objectivity, dedication, persistence, integrity and impregnability as a scientist. She hopes to emulate Dr. Levi-Montalcini, the Italian Nobel laureate and neurobiologist, and dedicate her entire life to scientific research, working for her ideal.
      Professor Ip is a scientist, educator and university administrator, as Vice-President of Research and Graduate Studies of the HKUST. She hopes to share her research legacy with students and fellow researchers, nurturing the next generation of scientists par excellence.

      Director: Leslie Ng

      20/02/2018
    • An Explorer in DNA Diagnostics - Dennis Lo (II)

      An Explorer in DNA Diagnostics - Dennis Lo (II)

      Dr. Dennis Lo mainly focuses on genetics and medicine, DNA testing and other related areas of chemical pathology. In an article published in 1989, he pointed out the possibility of using DNA technology to analyse foetal cells in pregnant women's blood. In 1997 he found foetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women. He later led his Chinese University research team in pioneering a non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. By the end of 2011, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of Down's syndrome was finally applied clinically in Hong Kong and the United States. The team continues to work tirelessly to reduce testing costs to affordable levels. This non-invasive prenatal diagnosis has so far reached over 90 countries and regions around the world.

      Dr. Lo has continued to explore the possibility of using the technology to detect cancer. His ultimate goal is for doctors to map the genes of cancerous cells in the body using the non-invasive method of drawing a patient’s blood only once to enable early detection, early treatment, reduction of pain and improvement of survival rate.

      Dr. Lo claims he is lucky to be given the opportunity to stand on the shoulders of giants to explore the mysteries of human DNA. The giants he refers to are all the scientists who studied genetics throughout history. He also feels he is fortunate to be co-operating with leading experts in other fields such as mathematicians, mechanical engineering, and computer science. All the scientific breakthroughs the world has today would not have been possible without the joint collaboration of scientists in a wide range of disciplines.

      13/02/2018
    • An Explorer in DNA Diagnostics - Dennis Lo (I)

      An Explorer in DNA Diagnostics - Dennis Lo (I)

      Dr. Dennis Lo mainly focuses on genetics and medicine, DNA testing and other related areas of chemical pathology. In an article published in 1989, he pointed out the possibility of using DNA technology to analyse foetal cells in pregnant women's blood. In 1997 he found foetal DNA in the plasma of pregnant women. He later led his Chinese University research team in pioneering a non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. By the end of 2011, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of Down's syndrome was finally applied clinically in Hong Kong and the United States. The team continues to work tirelessly to reduce testing costs to affordable levels. This non-invasive prenatal diagnosis has so far reached over 90 countries and regions around the world.

      Dr. Lo has continued to explore the possibility of using the technology to detect cancer. His ultimate goal is for doctors to map the genes of cancerous cells in the body using the non-invasive method of drawing a patient’s blood only once to enable early detection, early treatment, reduction of pain and improvement of survival rate.

      Dr. Lo claims he is lucky to be given the opportunity to stand on the shoulders of giants to explore the mysteries of human DNA. The giants he refers to are all the scientists who studied genetics throughout history. He also feels he is fortunate to be co-operating with leading experts in other fields such as mathematicians, mechanical engineering, and computer science. All the scientific breakthroughs the world has today would not have been possible without the joint collaboration of scientists in a wide range of disciplines.

      06/02/2018
    • A journey of Soybean from Laboratory to Field: Lam Hon-ming (II)

      A journey of Soybean from Laboratory to Field: Lam Hon-ming (II)

      Lam Hon-ming is one of the few scientists in Hong Kong specializing in agriculture, his research focus is soybean, a cash crop also known as miracle legume. After completing genome sequencing of wild and cultivated species of soybean, Professor Lam and his team were able to identify the salt-tolerance gene in soybean. With such breakthrough, he goes on the work of developing new breed of salt and drought-tolerant soybean.

      Professor Lam is not only a scientist but also a dedicated educator, he is very keen on reaching out to the young generation, and be their mentor. Not only local young researchers, young scientists in South Africa, Argentina, Mainland China are learning from him. “The advancement of culture and humanity relies on the carrying on of knowledge through generations” as said by Professor Lam Hon-ming.

      30/01/2018
    • A journey of Soybean from Laboratory to Field: Lam Hon-ming (I)

      A journey of Soybean from Laboratory to Field: Lam Hon-ming (I)

      Lam Hon-ming is one of the few scientists in Hong Kong specializing in agriculture, his research focus is soybean, a cash crop also known as miracle legume. After completing genome sequencing of wild and cultivated species of soybean, Professor Lam and his team were able to identify the salt-tolerance gene in soybean. With such breakthrough, he goes on the work of developing new breed of salt and drought-tolerant soybean.

      Professor Lam is not only a scientist but also a dedicated educator, he is very keen on reaching out to the young generation, and be their mentor. Not only local young researchers, young scientists in South Africa, Argentina, Mainland China are learning from him. “The advancement of culture and humanity relies on the carrying on of knowledge through generations” as said by Professor Lam Hon-ming.

      23/01/2018
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