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    監製:Lo Chi Wa

    12/01/2019

    CHEUNG Man-yee is the first ethnic Chinese to become Director of Broadcasting. With the exception of a brief period of secondment to the Information Services Department, she worked at RTHK between 1972 and 1999, from when she first joined the broadcaster until her reassignment as Principal Hong Kong Economic and Trade Representative in Japan.

    During her time at RTHK, CHEUNG was committed to promoting the principles and model of public broadcasting, so as to free RTHK from commercial and governmental pressures and enable it to become a media organisation which purely served the public. All of RTHK’s productions – be it the drama series of the 1970s such as Below the Lion Rock which reflected real social conditions, programmes of the 1980s like City Forum and LegCo Review which encouraged citizens to express their opinions and increased Legco’s transparency respectively, or the controversial Headliner of the 1990s – were created with this vision in mind.

    In the 1980s, CHEUNG played a key role in driving the corporatisation of RTHK, hoping that it could develop as a public broadcaster both structurally and financially. Symposiums were held over this period to explore the purpose of public broadcasting and feasible directions in its implementation. Although the efforts were ultimately in vain, she believes that the spirit of public broadcasting is still alive today. At the same time, she also views the 1980s, an era that saw the prosperity and spirit of mutual support in the media industry, as well as the tolerance and confidence of Hong Kong society, as golden years that are still worth reminiscing.

    Executive Producer & Director: NG Wai In
    Assistant Producers: CHAN Tsz Shan, YIM Pui Ying, Dora CHAN


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Those were the Days

      Those were the Days

      CHEUNG Man-yee is the first ethnic Chinese to become Director of Broadcasting. With the exception of a brief period of secondment to the Information Services Department, she worked at RTHK between 1972 and 1999, from when she first joined the broadcaster until her reassignment as Principal Hong Kong Economic and Trade Representative in Japan.

      During her time at RTHK, CHEUNG was committed to promoting the principles and model of public broadcasting, so as to free RTHK from commercial and governmental pressures and enable it to become a media organisation which purely served the public. All of RTHK’s productions – be it the drama series of the 1970s such as Below the Lion Rock which reflected real social conditions, programmes of the 1980s like City Forum and LegCo Review which encouraged citizens to express their opinions and increased Legco’s transparency respectively, or the controversial Headliner of the 1990s – were created with this vision in mind.

      In the 1980s, CHEUNG played a key role in driving the corporatisation of RTHK, hoping that it could develop as a public broadcaster both structurally and financially. Symposiums were held over this period to explore the purpose of public broadcasting and feasible directions in its implementation. Although the efforts were ultimately in vain, she believes that the spirit of public broadcasting is still alive today. At the same time, she also views the 1980s, an era that saw the prosperity and spirit of mutual support in the media industry, as well as the tolerance and confidence of Hong Kong society, as golden years that are still worth reminiscing.

      Executive Producer & Director: NG Wai In
      Assistant Producers: CHAN Tsz Shan, YIM Pui Ying, Dora CHAN

      12/01/2019
    • I Am What I Write – Cheng Kwok-kong

      I Am What I Write – Cheng Kwok-kong

      Radio programmes centred on music have always drawn in music aficionados. For a song to tug at people’s heartstrings, in addition to a beautiful melody, evocative lyrics are obviously essential. It can be said that the 1970s and 1980s were a time dominated by the three lyricists, Cheng Kwok-kong, Jimmy Lo, and James Wong.

      Known by many as “Mr. Cheng”, Cheng Kwok-kong worked as a fulltime primary school teacher for 31 years. However, he is better known for the 2,000-odd Cantopop songs that he has penned the lyrics to. Mr. Cheng has loved drawing since childhood, and has learned disciplines such as oil painting, traditional Chinese painting, and landscape painting. Consequently, it is not uncommon for one to discover pictures within his lyrics. His love affair with music began with listening to the radio, another of his favourite childhood pastimes. “I used to sing Cantonese opera as I walked. Because I have a bad memory, I’d forget some of the words halfway through a song. I had to make up some lyrics to keep it going,” he says.

      Mr. Cheng and George Lam have been partners in crime since the late 1970s, with the former penning the lyrics to more than 80 of the latter’s songs. Among them, I Need You Every Minute was almost written entirely in colloquial Cantonese: “Having you with me makes me happier. I’m content with everything when you’re near. Even salty fish and bok choy taste like the finest fare.” Prof. Stephen Chu of The University of Hong Kong’s School of Modern Languages and Cultures points out that Mr. Cheng handled the lyrics expertly – it does not come across as being vulgar as is the case with many other Cantonese love songs whose lyrics are colloquial.

      Albert Au, who has been a radio DJ for 41 years, once took part in the production of a radio drama titled Coming Home. Its theme song, the lyrics to which were written by Mr. Cheng, won Au a Gold Song Award back in the day. The singer is very impressed by how the lyricist is able to depict the story and its associated imagery in spectacular fashion with just a few short lines.

      For 30 years, Mr. Cheng worked as a primary school teacher while spreading positive energy in the music industry. His works, which brim with positivity, have earned him the moniker of “The Inspirational Lyricist”. Apart from countless inspirational songs, the lyrics to the majority of children’s songs and cartoon theme tunes of the 1970s and 1980s were also penned by him. In recent years, he has expanded into a new territory, writing Cantonese opera plays and even establishing a children’s Cantonese opera troupe. He hopes that its young members can learn about the art form in addition to performing on stage, so that they can pass this cultural treasure down to the next generation.

      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In
      Director: Yau, Annie
      Assistant Producer: Yim Pui Ying

      29/12/2018
    • Ho Kam-kong & Ho Ching-kong

      Ho Kam-kong & Ho Ching-kong

      HO Kam-kong and HO Ching-kong began to participate in radio football broadcast in the 60’s and 70’s. The two brothers are regarded by fans as a golden combo in the football commentating world, and their great chemistry is beyond compare. They inherited the commentary skills of their predecessors, YIP Kwun-chip and LO Chang-huen, and established the unique Hong Kong-style football broadcasting. Over the years, they followed the Hong Kong Team to give live broadcasts from overseas, witnessing the ups and downs of Hong Kong football. Not only did they host football programmes on and off the field, they were also the first ones to host live radio broadcast programmes of different sporting events. Radio was crucial to the promotion of local sports development, and the two have been very popular in the broadcasting world for half a century. From radio to television and from in front of the stage to behind the scene, they have always been the front-runners. With their never-say-die spirit, both are the “Mr. All Around” in the broadcasting world.

      22/12/2018
    • Chung King-Fai

      Chung King-Fai

      Life is like a drama. We all play the leading roles on the stage of life. Probably, we can only depend on our own “growth” and “experiences” to decide when, for whom and how to perform this drama, so as to create our own unique story.

      Drama maestro CHUNG King-fai, who is also known as “King Sir”, turned the ripe age of 80 in 2017. His friends, members of the performing industry and the media gathered to celebrate his birthday. CHUNG, who is enthusiastic about drama, shared and said, “I hope I will be able to continue with the job, as long as my body and abilities can cope.” This spirit of never say retire has brought positive impacts to his students and the younger generations of the industry.

      As audience, we may have seen CHUNG’s performances on TV and in movies and advertisements. Not only does his deep, majestic voice tell us the “stories from afar”, but also leads us to explore the meanings of life. These are all originated from CHUNG’s favourite – theatrical arts.

      CHUNG has devoted his full efforts and remained passionate about his job along the way, and walked the journey of love with theatrical arts in the past 80 years.

      15/12/2018
    • Li Ngaw & Siu Sheung

      Li Ngaw & Siu Sheung

      Both are legendary solo broadcasters. There were times when LI’s “airwaves novels” were on, the busy streets in Canton, Hong Kong and Macau would turn into ghost towns; and SIU’s “ethical fictions” had always made ladies, their loyal fans who listened to her programme every day, weep. LI and SIU are not only teacher and student, but husband and wife as well. They have been together for seven decades, what have they gained and what are left? They tell stories and their legend is a story. We shall let their friends, inside and outside the industry, together with LI and SIU tell the story about story-telling.

      08/12/2018
    • Uncle Ray

      Uncle Ray

      A senior and seasoned figure, Ray CORDEIRO (Uncle Ray) hosts a programme that broadcasts old songs from decades ago. However, his story is not at all about a group of people looking back at the past and indulging in their own world.

      The radio tuned in for Uncle Ray’s programme is a time machine. Play the songs chosen by Uncle Ray for his programme in any night to the young people nowadays and they will find it an absolutely novel musical experience, because those songs are completely different from the pop music they are familiar with. So are the world and the era those songs represent. If a youngster could travel back to the 1960’s, when Uncle Ray’s career took off, and come across the then budding local popular culture, they would be awestruck by their grandparents’ generation, whose curiosity about the world, enthusiasm for innovation, and drive to pursue dreams back then all rival, if not surpass, their own. Many things that characterised Hong Kong were developed from scratch in those years full of variables and vigour.

      Uncle Ray has always been open-minded with music, exposing himself to the ever-changing musical trends all along. Still, he has certain preferences and insistence when it comes to music.

      As time goes on, things change inevitably. Nostalgia is not necessarily the insistence on the old being better than the new. It is simply occasional reminiscence that enables us to better understand what it means to seize the moment and what should be cherished.

      01/12/2018