X

熱門

RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

    簡介

    GIST

    監製:Diana Wan


    RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

    "The Pulse" is presented by locally and internationally known journalist and writer Steve Vines.

    Its focus? The latest events and trends that affect Hong Kong - from the corridors of power and business boardrooms, to the streets and dai pai dongs.

    "The Pulse" is politics. What's happening in the Legislative Council and on the streets right now.

    "The Pulse" is the media, informing us how well or badly our press and broadcast organisations diagnose and reflect the society around us.

    "The Pulse" is insightful, in-depth reports and interviews on current issues - examining those issues in depth, looking behind and beyond the news.

    Its focus is on the timely. The Now.

    Keep your eye ... and your finger ... on "The Pulse".

    If you want to discuss anything you've seen in "The Pulse", or anything in the public eye right now, or just to talk about the show, why not join in the debate on our Facebook page, RTHK's The Pulse. 

    The programme is aired every Saturday on RTHK 31 & 31A at 00:00-00:30, and a repeat at 18:00-18:30. TVB Pearl on Saturday Morning at 08:30-09:00

    Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



    Find us on Facebook: RTHK's The Pulse

    最新

    LATEST
    24/06/2017

    Carrie Lam's new cabinet & discussion with Anson Chan, renewable energy in HK

    After winning the Chief Executive election, Carrie Lam promised new blood and diversity in her administration. After months of searching, she said she’d even had a nightmare about not having enough people to swear in on July 1”. Well on Wednesday, she unveiled her new cabinet – which indeed had all the seats filled but they were pretty much filled with same old people. This has encouraged many people to say: “Meet the new boss, Same as the old boss”. With us in the studio to talk about the new cabinet is former Cheif Secretary Anson Chan.

    In the wake of the United States’ government’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement on climate change there’ve been suggestions that China could now assume the role of leadership on this matter. Cynics point out that as long as it is so difficult to breathe in so many large Chinese cities it may be premature to talk about PRC leadership on climate issues. However the Mainland is seeing extraordinary growth in solar and wind power production. The 2016-2020 “five-year-plan” for renewables aims to raise total wind generation capacity from 129 gigawatts in 2015 to more than 210 GW by 2020. Solar energy production is set to rise from some 43 to 110 GW. The wind and solar sectors in the mainland have attracted as much as 5.4 trillion yuan in investment and created thousands of jobs. So how is Hong Kong doing in all of this? Well, maybe not so great.

    The United Kingdom’s “Queen’s Speech” may be delivered by the reigning monarch but is written by her ministers and lays out the government’s legislative agenda. This Wednesday, before heading to the horseracing at Royal Ascot The Queen announced a much scaled-down set of Conservative Party policies. Meanwhile, there was much social commentary about the possible significance of her apparently pro-EU headwear.
    Well, we’ll leave you to be the judge of that. Goodbye.

    重溫

    CATCHUP
    04 - 06
    2017
    RTHK 31
    • Carrie Lam's new cabinet & discussion with Anson Chan, renewable energy in HK

      Carrie Lam's new cabinet & discussion with Anson Chan, renewable energy in HK

      After winning the Chief Executive election, Carrie Lam promised new blood and diversity in her administration. After months of searching, she said she’d even had a nightmare about not having enough people to swear in on July 1”. Well on Wednesday, she unveiled her new cabinet – which indeed had all the seats filled but they were pretty much filled with same old people. This has encouraged many people to say: “Meet the new boss, Same as the old boss”. With us in the studio to talk about the new cabinet is former Cheif Secretary Anson Chan.

      In the wake of the United States’ government’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement on climate change there’ve been suggestions that China could now assume the role of leadership on this matter. Cynics point out that as long as it is so difficult to breathe in so many large Chinese cities it may be premature to talk about PRC leadership on climate issues. However the Mainland is seeing extraordinary growth in solar and wind power production. The 2016-2020 “five-year-plan” for renewables aims to raise total wind generation capacity from 129 gigawatts in 2015 to more than 210 GW by 2020. Solar energy production is set to rise from some 43 to 110 GW. The wind and solar sectors in the mainland have attracted as much as 5.4 trillion yuan in investment and created thousands of jobs. So how is Hong Kong doing in all of this? Well, maybe not so great.

      The United Kingdom’s “Queen’s Speech” may be delivered by the reigning monarch but is written by her ministers and lays out the government’s legislative agenda. This Wednesday, before heading to the horseracing at Royal Ascot The Queen announced a much scaled-down set of Conservative Party policies. Meanwhile, there was much social commentary about the possible significance of her apparently pro-EU headwear.
      Well, we’ll leave you to be the judge of that. Goodbye.

      24/06/2017
    • Standard Working Hours & panel discussion with Leong Che-hung and Carol Ng;  Food Trucks.

      Standard Working Hours & panel discussion with Leong Che-hung and Carol Ng; Food Trucks.

      With just two weeks to go before his departure, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying announced a long-awaited framework for standard working hours.
      Labour activists say the plan cheats Hong Kong workers and falls far short of Leung’s election manifesto promises. Meanwhile, employers warn that actually paying workers for working excessive hours could lead to job losses.

      Go out for a meal in Hong Kong and it’s a pretty fair bet that a sizeable chunk of your bill is going to a landlord. This has not been always been the case not only were rents lower, but customers had a wider choice of food stalls or dai pai dongs. Hawkers’ roadside food stalls commonly sold fish balls, sugarcane, ox tripe, dried cuttlefish in places like public housing estates, cinemas, swimming pools and parks.
      In the 1970s the government decided to stop issuing hawker licenses to new operators and brought in tighter controls and restrictions for existing license holders. When this generation of dai pai dong owners dies or retires another of Hong Kong’s traditions is likely to become history.
      It has been claimed that the introduction of food trucks provides some kind of replacement for this dwindling heritage. That’s questionable on a number of levels not least when the new scheme’s highly bureaucratic nature, lack of flexibility for moving the trucks around and high cost to customers is taken into account.

      We’ll leave you with a reminder from London of the tragic cost of high rise living when in literally minutes a home turns into a blazing inferno with heavy loss of life – no doubt in hi-rise Hong Kong there are also some sobering lessons to be learned.

      17/06/2017
    • UK Election & discussion with Kenneth Chan, housing in country parks

      UK Election & discussion with Kenneth Chan, housing in country parks

      "Pride goes before a fall” as the old British saying goes, and in April, after vowing on seven different occasions that she wasn’t going to call a snap election, UK prime Minister Theresa May, well, called a snap election. At the time her Conservative Party was riding high in public opinion polls. She figured that there was little to fear from the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and that a stronger mandate in the form of a tighter grip on parliament would improve her ability to negotiate Brexit.
      But it hasn’t worked as planned – indeed hasn’t worked out big time.

      Do birds excrete in trees? Yes they do, well that’s assuming they can find any foliage in Hong Kong’s urban areas, which brings us to complaints about bird droppings and potential falling branches – that led a tree to be pruned this week in Tai Po. This area also happens to be the second largest habitat for egrets and the tree pruning resulted in deaths and injuries to several hatchlings. Generally speaking however the government is not that worried about trees, but, as we have discovered, not all trees are equal.
      When the Chief Executive was asked why country parks could be used to develop housing while golf courses and the Chief Executive’s lodge in Fan Ling could not, Leung Chun-ying said it would be difficult as these places are home to “decades-old trees”. That’s a bit strange because last time I looked the country parks also seemed to be pretty full of old trees. However this has done little to dampen the outgoing Chief Executives’ determination to eat into the country parks.

      10/06/2017
    • CE Q&A, June 4th 28th anniversary & Ramadan

      CE Q&A, June 4th 28th anniversary & Ramadan

      There are just weeks to go before Leung Chun-ying steps down as Chief Executive. On Thursday at his final question and answer session in the Legislative Council, Leung was grilled on the UGL probe by pan-democrats, and offered plenty of softball questions by pro-government lawmakers. Meanwhile, for the third year in a row, attempts by the pan-democrats to introduce a motion commemorating the June 4th crackdown were sidelined. Outside the chamber though, the memory will be kept alive. This Sunday is the 28th anniversary.

      This year’s holy month of Ramadan for Muslims began last Friday evening, but there are fears it could turn into one of the most tragic holy months for a long time. On Tuesday this week, two terrorist attacks blasted the Iraq capital of Baghdad, killing at least 27 people and wounding more than 100. Takfiri Daesh claimed responsibility. A day later, a suicide truck bombing ripped through a secure diplomatic area of Kabul, Afghanistan in the morning rush hour, killing at least 90 people and wounding 400. In recent years, terrorist groups such as Islamic State have picked Ramadan as a peak time for committing acts of violence against other Muslims, but it has not deterred the faithful from observing the tradition.

      There are an estimated 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide, making it the second largest religion after Christianity. For believers the holy month of Ramadan, which began last Friday evening, is particularly important. In mainland China, the Islamic community is having a tough time. In the country’s largest Muslim provinces like Xinjiang with its ten million Uyghurs, the central government has banned Islamic baby names, burqas and “abnormal” beards, and plans to implement DNA checks as a means of controlling the movement of Muslims. This year, it’s also trying to stop people fasting during Ramadan and has ordered all restaurants to remain open. In Hong Kong Ramadan is still observed, particularly by the SAR’s Indonesian community, many of whom are working as domestic helpers.

      03/06/2017
    • Same-sex marriage & East Lantau Metropolis

      Same-sex marriage & East Lantau Metropolis

      On Wednesday Taiwan’s highest court ruled, in a landmark decision, in favour of same-sex marriage. That decision means that Taiwan will become the first place in Asia to legalise marriages of this kind despite the opposition of conservative groups in Taiwan who have argued – among other things – that acceptance of homosexuality is not Chinese. Meanwhile in Hong Kong the gay community has a far longer way to go to achieve equality before the law. With me in the studio are legislator, Priscilla Leung and Felix Yuen, Co-ordinator of Amnesty International’s LGBT group.

      For many Hongkongers, Lantau Island is a breath of fresh air. 54% of it is occupied by country parks. It is home to rare species such as Romer’s Tree Frog, and ecologically important sites such as montane forest, woodland, coastal waters and uncontaminated streams. There are also eight Sites of Special Scientific Interest where development is not permitted, as well as five declared monuments, five graded historical buildings, 57 archaeological sites and over 20 temples. There are now fears that a planned development of nearby Kau Yi Chau to become the East Lantau Metropolis could put this rich heritage at risk.

      27/05/2017
    • UGL Legco Select Committee, HA's Drugs Formulary

      UGL Legco Select Committee, HA's Drugs Formulary

      Do we dare say it? - Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying has threatened newspapers, a political commentator and even a legislator with legal action for talking about his HK$50 million payment from the Australian firm UGL. An 11-member Legislative Council committee has been set up to look into the matter. It’s expected to take 14 months to investigate. In a meeting on Monday members of the committee were informed of an unexpected intervention. With me in the studio is former Secretary for the Civil Service and professor, Joseph Wong.

      It can be expensive to be ill in Hong Kong. Much of that expense may be the drugs you need for treatment. Prices vary not only between private and public hospitals and clinics, but depending on the pharmaceutical. Last month, a single mother suffering from a serious disease pleaded to Legco for help in getting treatment. A week later she died. That’s given rise to increased discussion about medication that’s not government subsidised as it’s not included in the Hospital Authority’s Drug Formulary.

      20/05/2017
    • Medical blunder involving liver transplant patient Tang Kai-sze & HKTB's

      Medical blunder involving liver transplant patient Tang Kai-sze & HKTB's "Old Town Central"

      Our public hospitals are severely stretched. Lawmakers and watchdogs have long criticised the government for prioritising spending on infrastructure and capital projects over health care. The public health sector is short of staff and sinking due to overcrowding. The average consultation time for a public doctor’s appointment is now down to six minutes. And patient concern groups are saying that the recent high profile medical blunder in the treatment of liver transplant patient, Tang Kwai-sze, reveals just the tip of the iceberg. With me in the studio are legislator and doctor Kwok Ka-ki and Chiu Chun-ming, President of Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Hong Kong.

      What do tourists want? A self-proclaimed “shopping paradise”? An equally self-proclaimed “Asia’s World City”? Natural wonders? Or maybe a little bit of cultural heritage?
      Or maybe not as the Hong Kong government seems increasingly careless over heritage preservation: The country parks are under threat of property development, and you’ll need to look hard in the cracks between the high rises to find any material reminders of Hong Kong’s cultural history. Despite that, the Tourism Board is inviting visitors to visit “Old Town Central”. They’d better hurry.

      There’ve been plenty of ups and downs in world politics this week. For now, France has said no to isolationism and racism and elected the centrist former banker Emmanuel Macron as president. South Korea’s new president is a left-leaning liberal and human rights lawyer Moon Jae-in. Meanwhile things continue to spiral in the USA, as President Donald Trump fired the FBI director James Comey, the man investigating his campaign for ties to Russia. And he did so partly on the advice of Attorney General Jeff Sessions who’d had to recuse himself from that same investigation due to a conflict of interest. Outrage has followed, as the White House struggles to get its story straight. Something we have less problem with at The Pulse, so in that spirit we’ll see you next week. Goodbye.

      13/05/2017
    • Disney expansion & the

      Disney expansion & the "sharing economy"

      Hong Kong has a poor record for supporting the elderly poor, has limited resources for the public health service, and when it comes to housing for the less well-off, well, let’s say that seems to be on the too hard list but there’s always public money for Mickey Mouse. Hong Kong Disneyland has been controversial from the start. Even though Hong Kong’s coffers covered more than 80% of the initial 23 billion dollar cost of the project, the government has just a 57% share in the joint venture. There was even more controversy when, despite the hefty injection of public money, the park initially refused to release attendance figures. They were not spectacular. It has turned a profit for only three of its first eleven years in operation. Now Disney wants to expand and it wants Hong Kong to help pay for it. And here’s where we enter the magical kingdom of Hong Kong government studies and pixie dust: according to Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development Greg So, a “risk test” shows the city could lose up to 31.6 billion dollars over 40 years if it doesn’t spend HK$5.45 billion right now.

      Mobile apps, the rise of the digital economy, and the financial crisis, all played a part in the flourishing of what’s been called, not always entirely accurately, the “sharing economy”. This incudes businesses such as Uber and Lyft, as well as other “collaborative consumption” models like Kickstarter, Etsy and Airbnb. Many of these businesses involve sharing goods and services, but critics say that when they label themselves as examples of the shared economy, they are in reality operating on traditional profit models, making companies like Uber akin to a wolf in sheep‘s clothing. All the same, there’s no denying that these innovations are challenging traditional businesses. And that doesn’t make them universally popular.

      So what will it take to achieve the so-called “great reconciliation” to end the rift in our society? Democratic Party leader Wu Chi-wai was quickly shouted down when he suggested that in-coming Chief Executive Carrie Lam should pardon Occupy Central protesters and the eight police officers jailed for their over zealousness in handling the protest. Liberal Party leader Felix Chong suggested a roundtable involving both sides. And then on Thursday, some pan-democratic and pro-establishment lawmakers sat down for a lunch initiated by DAB chairwoman Starry Lee. Goodness knows what they ate but we do know that the Pulse will be back next week. Goodbye.

      06/05/2017
    • Greater Bay Area & the rise of nano flats

      Greater Bay Area & the rise of nano flats

      Hong Kong’s property prices are notoriously high. The annual US-based Demographia global housing affordability survey has ranked it as ‘terrible’ for the seventh consecutive year, and ranks Hong Kong as the world’s least affordable urban centre in which to buy a home. And no, it’s not an illusion, those homes really are shrinking. The average living area per person in Hong Kong has shrunk by almost 30% from 67.6 square feet to 47.8 square feet. And if the old shoeboxes were not snug enough, we now have the so-called nano flats.

      The people who run the government have however come up with a new housing solution: they’re saying if Hongkongers can’t afford Hong Kong, they should go live in the mainland, or more precisely the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area. That’s the advice from outgoing Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying and Financial Secretary Paul Chan. With us in the studio are Lau Ping-cheung non-official member of the Economic Development Commission, and chairman of the Liberal Party, Felix Chon.

      29/04/2017
    • North Korea tensions & HK-Zhuhai-Macau bridge causalties

      North Korea tensions & HK-Zhuhai-Macau bridge causalties

      Fears of global military conflicts and wars have risen since Donald Trump took office as US president. So far, when not conducting foreign “diplomacy” by Twitter, he’s launched 59 missiles at Syria, dropped the “Mother of All Bombs” on Afghanistan, and taken a tough line on North Korea and its provocative missile tests. From the other side of the Pacific, North Korea has said, worrying even the People’s Republic of China, that it will test missiles every week if it wants, and threatened, “all out war” if it needs to retaliate. WIth us in the studio to talk about it is Jean-Pierre Cabestan, Head of Department of Government and International Studies of Baptist University.

      Ever wondered where our tax dollars go? Well, according to the government, infrastructural projects, many referred to by those less prone to cheerleading as “white elephants”, top expenditure, followed by education, social welfare and health. HK$100 billion is earmarked for such projects in this year’s Budget. One of the grandest is the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau bridge. Critics have called it the “bridge to nowhere”, and not long after it’s completed it’s going to face competition from a new 24-km. bridge over the Pearl River Delta linking Zhongshan and Shenzhen. There are murmurs in some quarters that the Hong Kong-Macau-Zhuhai bridge isn’t going to be ready for commissioning, as scheduled, by the end of the year. The government insists it will, although there will still be some elements to complete. It’s 34 years since Hopewell Holdings founder Gordon Wu first suggested the idea. Agreements on funding were reached between Hong Kong, Macau and the mainland in 2008, and – inevitably – as with all such long running projects, it’s going to end up costing more than was planned. We have no idea of the safety record of the project on the mainland side, but in Hong Kong there’s been a considerable human cost, in terms of both injuries and death.

      22/04/2017
    • 網站獲奬:

    • 在新分頁開啟第五屆傳媒轉型大獎
    • 在新分頁開啟2014優秀網站選舉十大優秀網站