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RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene. The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

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    監製:Diana Wan


    RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene.

    The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

    Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

    The Works is aired on TVB Pearl every Tuesday at HKT 1900 -1930 and on RTHK 31 & 31A every Wednesday at 00:00-00:30 and a repeat at 17:30-18:00.

    Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.



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    19/04/2017

    Artist Christo, Tomokazu Matsuyama & Andrew Hevia on "Moonlight"

    March, otherwise known as Art month brought several international artists to Hong Kong. Few are as monumental or as spectacular in their work as Christo, known not only for, with his late wife and long-time creative collaborator Jeanne-Claude, wrapping the Reichstag and the Pont Neuf, but also for covering the Japanese and Californian landscapes with hundreds of blue and yellow umbrellas.

    Japanese-American artist Tomokazu Matsuyama, perhaps more commonly known as Matsu, lives and works in New York. Growing up between, and influenced by, both Eastern and Western cultures, he described his artistic style as the “struggle of reckoning the familiar local with the familiar global”. That mixed identity is reflected in the influences on his work, which include Japanese art from the Edo and Meiji eras, classic Greek and Roman art, French Renaissance painting and contemporary art.

    Missing out on explosions, 3D, comic book heroes, or extensive computer graphics, the movie “Moonlight” would have almost certainly slipped under the radar of most Hongkongers if it hadn’t, in the same week it was released here, taken the Best Picture Oscar at the Academy Awards. It was certainly a memorable ceremony, including one of the most embarrassing gaffes in Oscar history, when the wrong envelope was given to co-presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and Dunaway announced “La La Land” as Best Picture. Directed by Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight” is the coming-of-age story of an African-American male coming to terms with his own homosexuality against the backdrop of a socially deprived and drug-ridden Miami neighbourhood. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards this year. It won three, including Best Picture, Best Actor in a Supporting Role and Best Writing of an Adapted Screenplay. The film’s co-producer, Andrew Hevia, was in Hong Kong last month for FILMART, and we caught up with him while he was here.

    重溫

    CATCHUP
    02 - 04
    2017
    RTHK 31
    • Artist Christo, Tomokazu Matsuyama & Andrew Hevia on

      Artist Christo, Tomokazu Matsuyama & Andrew Hevia on "Moonlight"

      March, otherwise known as Art month brought several international artists to Hong Kong. Few are as monumental or as spectacular in their work as Christo, known not only for, with his late wife and long-time creative collaborator Jeanne-Claude, wrapping the Reichstag and the Pont Neuf, but also for covering the Japanese and Californian landscapes with hundreds of blue and yellow umbrellas.

      Japanese-American artist Tomokazu Matsuyama, perhaps more commonly known as Matsu, lives and works in New York. Growing up between, and influenced by, both Eastern and Western cultures, he described his artistic style as the “struggle of reckoning the familiar local with the familiar global”. That mixed identity is reflected in the influences on his work, which include Japanese art from the Edo and Meiji eras, classic Greek and Roman art, French Renaissance painting and contemporary art.

      Missing out on explosions, 3D, comic book heroes, or extensive computer graphics, the movie “Moonlight” would have almost certainly slipped under the radar of most Hongkongers if it hadn’t, in the same week it was released here, taken the Best Picture Oscar at the Academy Awards. It was certainly a memorable ceremony, including one of the most embarrassing gaffes in Oscar history, when the wrong envelope was given to co-presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, and Dunaway announced “La La Land” as Best Picture. Directed by Barry Jenkins, “Moonlight” is the coming-of-age story of an African-American male coming to terms with his own homosexuality against the backdrop of a socially deprived and drug-ridden Miami neighbourhood. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards this year. It won three, including Best Picture, Best Actor in a Supporting Role and Best Writing of an Adapted Screenplay. The film’s co-producer, Andrew Hevia, was in Hong Kong last month for FILMART, and we caught up with him while he was here.

      19/04/2017
    • VR in Art, Art Market Report & West Side Story in our studio

      VR in Art, Art Market Report & West Side Story in our studio

      3D movies, 360 degree cameras, virtual reality games … artists and scientists have been interested in immersing us in convincing recreations of reality for quite some time.
      Way back in the 19th century there were already attempts to surround people with 360 degree murals. The theatre too, as in the work of Antonin Artaud or the Futurists, tried to blur the line between the performance and the real. Later came such developments as 3D films, flight simulators, Sensorama, and more. More recently virtual reality headsets have made virtual reality even more real. And where scientists and entertainers go, artists may follow. This year’s Art Basel featured several attempts to transport visitors into a world other than their own.

      Art is communication. It’s also a commodity. And the two don’t always sit well together. Thinkers as different as Karl Marx, Immanuel Kant, Thorstein Veblen, Walter Benjamin, and more have discussed this dual nature of creativity. Art fairs and art auctions themselves are clear examples of the interaction of the two worlds of commodity and art. Two recent reports on the art market, one new one presented at this year’s Art Basel suggest that the economics of the art world may have taken a slight turn for the worse over the past couple of years, but researchers like Clare McAndrew, known for her research on the art market, still see a positive future.

      It’s not so rare for writers and composers to turn to the works of Shakespeare for inspiration, and that’s exactly what happened with one of the world’s most loved musicals, when “Romeo and Juliet” became Maria and Tony, and the Montagues and Capulets became the Jets and the Sharks in “West Side Story”.
      With a book by Arthur Laurents, music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, it debuted in Washington in August 1957, and a month later on Broadway. Now it’s coming to Hong Kong. And “Maria” and “Tony” are here with Ben.

      12/04/2017
    • Art Basel & Art Central

      Art Basel & Art Central

      For art lovers, artists, and art dealers, March can be the most hectic time of the year as one of the world’s largest art fairs, Art Basel, comes to town. Art Basel’s success here, as well as the fact that Hong Kong is now apparently the world’s third largest art market, has turned what was once an art week into something approaching an art month. Apart from the big fairs – there’s also Art Central – local galleries and other art organisations pull out all the stops to attract attention while visitors are in town. There was a lot to take in, and if you didn’t have the stamina to get to it all, over the coming weeks The Works will be bringing you some of the interviews, events and exhibitions that we managed to cover. We’re beginning today with the two most prominent art fairs, Art Basel and Art Central. This year, we invited art writer Diana d’Arenberg to take us on a tour of Art Basel Hong Kong.

      Within easy walking distance of the Cultural and Exhibition Centre and Art Basel, Art Central was once again ensconced on the Central Harbourfront. This year’s fair attracted more than 100 contemporary art galleries, most of which focused on promoting emerging Asia-based artists. Like Art Basel, Art Central has an educational component that includes talks, interactive installations, panel discussions and films. This year, the organisers also placed particular emphasis on performance art.

      05/04/2017
    • Pina Bausch Cafe Muller & Rite of Spring, Trisha Brown Tribute & German Hornsound

      Pina Bausch Cafe Muller & Rite of Spring, Trisha Brown Tribute & German Hornsound

      The Works has been featuring Pina Bausch’s Tanztheater Wuppertal for over a decade, particularly during their visits to Hong Kong to perform at the annual Arts Festival. Dance lovers in Hong Kong have been lucky enough to see “Iphigenia In Tauris”, “1980”, “Full Moon” and “Carnations”. This year, the company was here again, this time with two of Pina Bausch’s very significant early works, “Café Muller” and “Rite of Spring”.

      Pina changed people’s view of what dance could be by introducing theatrical elements and collaborating with her dancers to bring the human psyche and human emotions to the fore. American choreographer Trisha Brown, who died on 18th March at the age of 80, took dance in another direction, towards the more conceptual ideas of postmodernism. She was one of the pioneers of the New York postmodern dance tradition. In 2014, a year after she’d had to leave the company due to illness, the Trisha Brown Dance Company came to the Hong Kong Arts Festival with some of her most iconic works. We spoke to them.

      Think of the German horn, and you may think of brass bands and beer, or – if you’re of a more sophisticated frame of mind – Richard Strauss’s Till Eulenspiegel’s horn theme, or Wagner’s Siegfried playing the horn that awakens the dragon Fafner. It’s a favourite instrument in German music, and that may be part of the reason that, in 2009, four friends at the Stuttgart University of Music and Performing Arts set up German Hornsound. The ensemble performs a repertoire that includes not only classical music but also original works and arrangements. They’re here in our studio with Ben Pelletier.

      29/03/2017
    • Singer Arianna Savall, artist Yang Jiechang & recorder player Piers Adams

      Singer Arianna Savall, artist Yang Jiechang & recorder player Piers Adams

      Swiss-born Spanish singer, harpist, and composer, Arianna Savall’s parents, viol player, composer and conductor, Jordi Savall, and the late singer Montserrat Figueras, have long specialised in Early Music, particularly from Catalonia and the Middle East. Arianna has taken up the same legacy. She's here at this year's Hong Kong Arts Festival.

      Guangzhou-born Yang Jiechang mixes traditional practices with Western concepts to critique contemporary society. His own personal history reflects his own country’s late 20th-century upheavals: as a teenager he was a member of the Red Guards before rebelling and deciding to be an artist. He studied Chinese ink painting and calligraphy in the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts, where his graduation project “Massacre” on the devastation of the Cultural Revolution was censored. He began to study Taoism, leaving behind, the red of patriotism and communism for, “a black and grey world.”

      Well, this may be the first time we’ve had anyone trained as an astrophysicist on The Works, but Piers Adams is here because he discovered a calling to be a recorder player at the age of 21. A chance encounter with a group of Hungarian gypsy musicians at a music festival in Belgium gave him the inspiration to develop greater freedom, emotion and virtuosity in his style of playing. He’s here with Ben now.

      22/03/2017
    • The role of museums in HK, Art from Myanmar & the 18-member Kinjo Gakuin University Handbell Choir

      The role of museums in HK, Art from Myanmar & the 18-member Kinjo Gakuin University Handbell Choir

      The introduction of a branch of the Palace Museum in West Kowloon has been presented to Hong Kong as a fait accompli, and through a financing structure that removes its construction, although possibly not its running costs, from any legislative oversight. The issue has raised questions for many about just what Hong Kong society expects and needs from its public museums and how it might get it.

      According to the government of Myanmar, or Burma, some 135 different ethnic groups live within the country. It may be hardly surprising then that the nation has been caught up in ethnic conflicts and civil wars for generations. It was colonised by the British for 124 years, was more recently ruled by a military dictatorship, and is now making a tentative transition to a more democratic system under the partial guidance of State Counsellor and long-time democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi. Ethnic conflict still remains - the Rohingya people in particular are currently bearing much of the brunt – as does political uncertainty. Against this background, the country’s contemporary artists are exploring their identity and society in general, with vibrant colour and in assorted media formats, as you can currently see in the exhibition “Yangon Made My Heart Beat Fast” at the Karin Weber Gallery.

      In 1970, American missionary Merle Kelly introduced the handbell to Kinjo Gakuin, a private Christian girls’ school in Nagoya, Japan. The handbell programme began in the junior high school and continued on to high school and then up to university level. Many members of the Kinjo Gakuin University Handbell Choir began ringing as juniors and kept it up all through their education. The members of the current 18-member handbell choir are with us right now.

      15/03/2017
    • HKAF Special: Bavarian State Ballet II, jazz drummer, Terri Lyne Carrington &

      HKAF Special: Bavarian State Ballet II, jazz drummer, Terri Lyne Carrington & "Typography and the Sea of Words"

      We’re about half way through the 45th annual Hong Kong Arts Festival, which opened just two weeks ago. And whatever your taste in performing arts, there’s been, and will be, plenty to see. You have 129 dance, music, or drama shows to choose from, featuring more than 1,600 international and local artists. Based in Munich, Germany, the Bavarian State Ballet opened at this year’s Arts Festival with a Russian classic set in India, and not seen in Hong Kong for more than 20 years, “La Bayadere”. The Junior Company of the Bavarian State Ballet, the Bavarian State Ballet II, was also here. They performed a programme of four more recent pieces. And three-time Grammy award jazz drummer, Terri Lyne Carrington is probably best known as a drummer, but she’s also a composer, singer and record producer. She’ll be talking to us about “Mosaic Project: Love and Soul”.

      If there’s one thing that tourists who visit Hong Kong almost certainly photograph it’s our array of brightly coloured street signs. For visitors, as for many locals, business signs moulded in plastic, written by hand, or created to neon, are an integral and intriguing part of the cityscape. Inevitably the forms of our street signs reflect our urban and cultural development. They may also reflect that our lives are becoming blander, as our streets become more homogenous. The exhibition “Typography and the Sea of Words” organised by the Conservancy Association Centre for Heritage at Sai Ying Pun, focuses on the changing signs of our times.

      08/03/2017
    • Jaffa Lam x Sam Tung Uk, Luis Chan, Chou Chinghui's Animal Farm & violinst Adrian Anantawan

      Jaffa Lam x Sam Tung Uk, Luis Chan, Chou Chinghui's Animal Farm & violinst Adrian Anantawan

      RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene. The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .

      Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also a regular critical review of what' s on at the movies, and – most weeks – a live studio performance.

      01/03/2017
    • The Legendary Pulp at HK Open Printshop & flautist Jasmine Choi

      The Legendary Pulp at HK Open Printshop & flautist Jasmine Choi

      Over the past year the Hong Kong Open Printshop has been adopting the theme of paper for its exhibitions. It’s rounding off that year of projects with a finale exhibition “The Legendary Pulp” in preparation for which three artists, from the United States, Australia, and Hong Kong, took up a one-month residency to demonstrate the versatility and possibilities of paper, and of art on paper.

      Korean flautist Jasmine Choi grew up in a musical family. Her grandfather is a conductor and her mother a violinist. She didn’t pick up the flute until she was nine, although she’d previously tried the violin and the piano, but within seven years, at 16, she was accepted to the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. After earning a Master of Music degree from the Juilliard School, she played in several orchestras before developing a solo career that includes work with orchestras and chamber groups, and even incorporates experimental jazz and pop music. She’s here right now with Ben.

      22/02/2017
    • Migrant Women Workers, Wilson Shieh x Sun Yat Sen Museum & Singer Songwriter Najwa Mahiaddin

      Migrant Women Workers, Wilson Shieh x Sun Yat Sen Museum & Singer Songwriter Najwa Mahiaddin

      Like many other hard working cities, Hong Kong would most likely find it hard to thrive as it does without the presence of female migrant workers from countries like the Philippines and Indonesia. The same story is repeated across much of the world. Economic disparities mean many in poorer countries have to leave their own homes, and work in the homes of others, to survive and earn money for their families. And sometimes the work they do is considerably harder on them than domestic work. The challenges of the lives of female migrant workers is the subject of a current exhibition at the University of Hong Kong.

      Over the past month, The Works has been introducing the Hi! Houses series, in which artists are invited to create site-specific art works in some of Hong Kong’s most significant older buildings. So far we’ve seen Lam Tung-pang’s work in Wong Uk in Shatin, and an exhibition by ceramic artist Fiona Wong at Law Uk in Chai Wan. Today, we’re heading to mid-levels, to Kom Tong Hall, and the work of Wilson Shieh. And in case the name “Kom Tong Hall” doesn’t mean anything to you, you might know it better as a museum dedicated to one particular revolutionary thinker.

      In 1974, as part of a small group of philosophers and literary figures from France, Roland Barthes visited China, during the final stage of the Cultural Revolution. The group was warmly received by Chinese writers and academics, but their visit was tightly controlled and they were kept to a highly planned and monitored itinerary. Barthes planned to write a book on the trip when he returned to France, but he never completed it. However, in 2011, more than three decades later, “Travels in China” a book based on notes and other materials he wrote at the time, was published. At Blindspot Gallery five Chinese artists have taken those notes as the starting point for their group exhibition “After Party: Collective Dance and Individual Gymnastics”. Their aim, they say, is to highlight the complex political tension between the ideological control of the state and the expression of the individual will.

      A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Malaysian singer songwriter, Najwa Mahiaddin released her first album “Innocent Soul” six years ago, and was instantly recognised for her soul and R&B style. Now though, she’s changing musical direction a little. She’s here to tell us more about it.

      15/02/2017
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