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    監製:Diana Wan

    06/12/2017

    From October through to the middle of November the World Cultures Festival presented “Vibrant Africa” a series of events and performances that highlighted a wide range of arts from across the continent. The final performance of “Vibrant Africa” was the “Mandela Trilogy” Presented by Cape Town Opera, the three-act theatrical production combines opera, musical and traditional Xhosa song and dance.

    Yau Leung was not only a movie stills and documentary photographer but also an acclaimed photo editor for several organisations, periodicals and publications. He founded the periodical “Photography Life”, was an editor of “Photo Tech” and editor-in-chief of “Photo Art”. Sadly he died at the relatively young age of 56 after a fall. Now on show at Blindspot Gallery in Wong Chuk Hang, “Hong Kong Stories 1960s” showcases around 30 vintage gelatin silver prints hand-printed by Yau himself. It’s the first exhibition of Yau’s work since his death.

    Virtuoso drummer, composer, bandleader, and five-time Grammy winner, Antonio Sanchez, is one of the most prominent jazz musicians working today. He’s particularly well known for his work with the Pat Metheny Group he began collaborating with in 2002. If you’re not all that plugged into the jazz scene, you may still know Antonio’s work, at least if you go to the cinema. He provided the frenetic drum score for the Academy Award winning film “Birdman”.
    Two weeks ago, he was in Hong Kong again, with his band, “Migration”, for a one-night concert.


    聯絡: wanyt@rthk.hk


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    • Mandela Trilogy, photographer Yau Leung's HK in 1960s & drummer Antonio Sanchez

      Mandela Trilogy, photographer Yau Leung's HK in 1960s & drummer Antonio Sanchez

      From October through to the middle of November the World Cultures Festival presented “Vibrant Africa” a series of events and performances that highlighted a wide range of arts from across the continent. The final performance of “Vibrant Africa” was the “Mandela Trilogy” Presented by Cape Town Opera, the three-act theatrical production combines opera, musical and traditional Xhosa song and dance.

      Yau Leung was not only a movie stills and documentary photographer but also an acclaimed photo editor for several organisations, periodicals and publications. He founded the periodical “Photography Life”, was an editor of “Photo Tech” and editor-in-chief of “Photo Art”. Sadly he died at the relatively young age of 56 after a fall. Now on show at Blindspot Gallery in Wong Chuk Hang, “Hong Kong Stories 1960s” showcases around 30 vintage gelatin silver prints hand-printed by Yau himself. It’s the first exhibition of Yau’s work since his death.

      Virtuoso drummer, composer, bandleader, and five-time Grammy winner, Antonio Sanchez, is one of the most prominent jazz musicians working today. He’s particularly well known for his work with the Pat Metheny Group he began collaborating with in 2002. If you’re not all that plugged into the jazz scene, you may still know Antonio’s work, at least if you go to the cinema. He provided the frenetic drum score for the Academy Award winning film “Birdman”.
      Two weeks ago, he was in Hong Kong again, with his band, “Migration”, for a one-night concert.

      06/12/2017
    • Nederland Dans Theater & Taiwan Films

      Nederland Dans Theater & Taiwan Films

      RTHK' s The Works focuses on Hong Kong's arts and cultural scene. The Works features news and reviews of visual and performing arts, design, literary and other “ works ” .
      Added illumination comes from interviews with leading performers and producers, interspersed with updates on events affecting the development of the territory 's artistic and cultural life. There's also in – most weeks – a live studio performance.

      29/11/2017
    • The ink art of Fang Zhaoling, Greg Girard's HK nightlife &  Musicus Fest's

      The ink art of Fang Zhaoling, Greg Girard's HK nightlife & Musicus Fest's "Marco Polo Goes to Carnival”

      Ink painting, and more specifically the ink art of a distinguished female Chinese artist: Fang Zhaoling. Working in a traditionally male-dominated field, Fang was a progressive thinker in both her art and her life. Not only did she study under, and collaborate with, some of the masters of Chinese painting, and become well versed in traditional Chinese culture, she also pursued studies at the University of Manchester, and later at Oxford University, a path not open to many women of her time and culture. Fang also – after the early death of her husband – needed to become a successful business woman to raise their eight children, one of whom is former Chief Secretary Anson Chan who, with her brother David Fang, spoke to us about a recent exhibition of her work.

      Canadian photographer Greg Girard came to Hong Kong as a teenager in 1974. He’s spent much of his life in Asia since. His exhibition “HK:PM”, which was shown at PMQ earlier this month, is a collection of images of Girard’s nocturnal wanderings between 1974 to 1986, as he captured the neon-lit streets of Hong Kong, the nightlife and the bygone era of the 1970s and 1980s.

      "Marco Polo Goes to Carnival” is an original production by the Musicus Society to celebrate the fifth anniversary of its annual festival.
      A concert for children, it explores the world of the Venice carnival in music, ballet and drama, and tells the story of Marco Polo’s journey to China.
      The production combines Stravinsky’s “Suite Italienne” - an arrangement of several movements from his ballet “Pulcinella” - with an early form of theatre known as “commedia dell’arte”. Joining us now are producer and writer Ursula Volkmann and choreographer Victoria Vargas.

      22/11/2017
    • Interview with Berlin Philharmonic Simon Rattle & in the studio: The Sousaphonics

      Interview with Berlin Philharmonic Simon Rattle & in the studio: The Sousaphonics

      Classical music fans were in for a double treat last weekend. For one thing, the acclaimed Berlin Philharmonic was in town for concerts on Friday and Saturday at the Hong Kong Cultural Centre. Also, on Saturday night, just across the harbour at the Central Harbourfront Promenade, the Hong Kong Philharmonic was putting on its annual mega event, Symphony Under the Stars. Both concerts offered the chance, rare in Hong Kong, to enjoy classical music in the open air. Tickets for the Berlin Philharmonic concerts, some of which were just under HK$3,000, sold like hot cakes. But for those who couldn’t afford them, or missed out on buying, there were outdoor live relays to see. Simon Rattle first conducted the Berlin Philharmonic in 1987 with Gustav Mahler’s Sixth Symphony. He’s been the orchestra’s Chief Conductor since 2002, but now, after 15 years, he’s about to leave. Hong Kong pianist Jacqueline Leung went to talk to him for The Works.

      The sousaphone is named after John Philip Sousa, bandmaster and composer of so many marches - including ”The Stars and Stripes Forever” - he was nicknamed “The March King”. He had early versions of the sousaphone made according to his specifications in the late 19th century. Although he wanted it primarily for its ease of use as a marching band instrument, it also became popular with jazz musicians in the 1920s. The Australian ensemble, The Sousaphonics, naturally includes the instrument, but they also perform on trumpet, trombone, tenor saxophone, flute, drums and percussion. They were here in Hong Kong last week, and they spoke to Ben Pelletier.

      15/11/2017
    • African singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo, in the studio: Festive Korea classical trio

      African singer-songwriter Angelique Kidjo, in the studio: Festive Korea classical trio

      We’re taking a trip to Africa, and more precisely to Benin, a country on Africa’s Atlantic coast. That's where singer-songwriter, activist and Grammy award winner Angelique Kidjo was born and raised. And she draws her musical inspiration from a variety of sources: African traditions, American soul, funk, rap, jazz, samba, reggae, and salsa. In the late 1970s, she formed her own band and released an album, but at her first major concert in Togo she was criticised for refusing to sing songs praising Benin's communist party. A later unpleasant experience of having to stage a concert for government officials pushed her to move to Paris, and later New York. It was thirteen years before she returned to Benin, where she is now recognised as a star and a musical ambassador.

      Festive Korea was launched in Hong Kong in 2011. It’s now in its 7th edition. The two-month festival includes traditional arts, dance, musical, classical music, pop music, cinema and food. One of this year’s highlights was a concert by the Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra that featured the music of Mahler, Bruch and Tchaikovsky.
      But the festival also features a young generation of musicians, such as violinist Ji Young Lim, pianist Da Sol Kim and cellist Min-Ji Kim, and they are with us now.

      08/11/2017
    • Freespace@Taikoo Place: Dance, photographer Mike Korostelev, in the studio: Tjoe & band

      Freespace@Taikoo Place: Dance, photographer Mike Korostelev, in the studio: Tjoe & band

      Local musician, Olivier Cong was in our studio last week telling us about his performance in the ongoing Freespace festival in and around Taikoo Place. But the festival includes more than music. The new Artistree, is featuring a series of programmes focusing on dance, including collaborations between videographers and Hong Kong dance artists.

      Last week was Russian Culture Week in Hong Kong. It was also Zurich Meets Hong Kong week. Both festivals started and ended at the same time. If you didn’t know which events from which designated week to go to, or if you couldn’t make it to any, don’t worry. In the next couple of shows we’re going to be bringing you some of the highlights.
      One of the events in Russian Culture Week featured the wildlife photographer Mike Korostelev. He specialises in underwater photography, and has filmed sharks, crocodiles, sea lions, seals, and manatees, among other creatures. But he shoots on dry land too. His two-day exhibition in Hong Kong last week focused on the spectacular nature and wildlife of Russia.

      Local guitarist and composer Tjoe Man Cheung and fellow musicians played a jazz concert last Thursday. Tjoe’s been away from Hong Kong for a couple of years, mostly working and living in the United Kingdom. While there he wrote, played, and built up an even wider circle of international music collaborators, with whom he formed the jazz collective “Not-To-Be-Missed”. Their debut album “and orange” was released last month on 12” LP and in digital format. Tjoe and some of his musical collaborators are with us right now.

      01/11/2017
    • German Film Festival KINO, #resist & in our studio: singer-songwriter Olivier Cong

      German Film Festival KINO, #resist & in our studio: singer-songwriter Olivier Cong

      From films like “Metropolis”, “Nosferatu” and “The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari” to the movies of Douglas Sirk, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Wim Wenders, Werner Herzog, and more, German cinema has not only made a name for itself in the international movie scene, but also had many effects on the Hollywood mainstream. As a nation, Germany has undergone huge upheavals over the past 100 years. Its filmmakers have reflected them, from the cabarets of the Weimar Republic, through two World Wars, and division by the Berlin Wall, to its current highly influential position in the European Union. Its serious filmmakers have rarely shied away from unsparing examination of the country’s social and political changes.

      This year’s KINO German Film Festival, organised by the Goethe Institut is bringing in ten films that represent the recent trends in German cinema and German society and tackle topics such as homeland and identity, love and friendship, sorrow and loss.

      Turing away from the big screen, a satellite exhibition of this year’s Microwave International New Media Arts Festival, #resist is featuring a number of video works by artists from India, Israel, Iraq, Germany and Hong Kong. The focus of the works, as the name suggests, is civil disobedience, a form of protest that’s gaining new impetus in many countries as their governments drift to the right and to authoritarian structures.

      Freespace Happening is a series of outdoor programmes and festivals organised by the West Kowloon Cultural District. Previously the events, which included outdoor cinema, concerts, handicraft markets, pop-up stores, DIY workshops, literature activities and dance, took place in West Kowloon’s Nursery Park. This week, and up to 5th Novermber, Freespace is moving into a different environment and into the more built up and commercial setting in and around Taikoo Place. Some eighty local and overseas artists will be performing in some unexpected places and at some unexpected times, both during the day and in the evenings. One of those performers will be singer-songwriter Olivier Cong. Olivier is a young singer-songwriter who began writing his own songs while studying in the United Kingdom. He’s influenced by the music of Leonard Cohen, Damien Rice, and Radiohead, and others. He’s performed in London, Prague, Berlina and Amsterdam among other places. Last year you might have caught him at Clockenflap. If you missed him there, you can catch him here just a little later. He’ll be chatting to Billy Lee, presenter of our sister show 藝坊星期天.

      25/10/2017
    • Leonardo da Vinci's

      Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvator Mundi" in HK, Silk exhibition at HKDI & Ha Bik-chuen's archive

      Last week Hong Kong was one of the few key cities that had the chance to see “Salvator Mundi” a rare painting by the Renaissance master Leonardo da Vinci. Just one of no more than 20 surviving paintings by da Vinci, it’s considered one of the art world’s greatest treasures. It’s also the last da Vinci painting to be privately owned.

      Just one of no more than 20 surviving paintings by da Vinci, it’s considered one of the art world’s greatest treasures. It’s also the last da Vinci painting to be privately owned.
      Unveiled here last Friday, it was on show for just four days before being shipped off. It will be exhibited in two more places and then auctioned in New York next month.

      China has been making silk since the Neolithic Age. It wasn’t until the latter half of the first millennium BC when a commercial trade route from China to the Mediterranean Sea opened up that silk reached other parts of the world. This route became known as the Silk Road. In collaboration with the China National Silk Museum, the Hong Kong Design Institute is currently showing in its gallery “In Praise of Silk”, which looks at the Chinese heritage of the finest of fabrics.

      When sculptor, printmaker and painter, Ha Bik-chuen died at 84 in 2009, he left behind not only his artworks but also a treasure trove of art related materials and documentation he had been gathering for decades. In recent years, at the request of his family, the Asia Art Archive has been working on a project that involves examining and documenting that archive, including over 100,000 of Ha’s own photographs and 3,500 of his contact sheets.

      18/10/2017
    • LGBTQI Special:

      LGBTQI Special: "Spectrosynthesis" exhibition in Taiwan & "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” film & musical

      Hello and welcome to the new season of The Works. Behind us on this first show you can see the iconic bus, “Priscilla”, the centrepiece of the movie and now the stage show “Priscilla Queen of the Desert”. That should give you some clue that we’re devoting this week’s show to art centred on gender, and more specifically, LGBTQI culture.
      Later, Mitzi, Felicia and Bernadette the divas of “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” will take us on a road trip across the Australian outback. In homage to one particular scene in the movie Ben’s even wearing his purple shirt. “It’s not purple. It’s lavender.” But before we head down under, we’re taking a trip to Taiwan, which is not only on track to lead the way in Asia in acceptance of gay marriage, but is also providing the venue for an exhibition on LGBTQI culture co-organised by a Hong Kong-based businessman and the Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art.

      Released in 1994, the low-budget Australian comedy, “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” not only became a smash hit movie internationally, it also brought LGBTQI issues front and centre in mainstream cinema. And did we also mention it’s very funny, with plenty of snappy one liners, great dance numbers, and costumes to die for? No surprise then that it went on to become a long-running musical stage show. The movie’s writer and director, Stephan Elliott, was in Hong Kong last week. We caught up with him.

      As we said before the break, Stephan Elliott’s “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” is an often funny and sometimes poignant film about two drag queens and one transgender woman on tour across the Australian Outback from Sydney to Alice Springs. Made on a very low budget, the movie became an international phenomenon, and one that for the most part leant itself to a stage version, which debuted in Australia in 2006. It’s not so easy to get the outback on stage after all. The award-winning show is currently on in Hong Kong and features more than 500 costumes and 200 headdresses. So without further ado, we’re happy to introduce to you Mitzi, Felicia, and Bernadette.

      11/10/2017
    • Augustine Mok Chiu-yu, Nobuyoshi Araki & in the studio: pianist Rachel Cheung

      Augustine Mok Chiu-yu, Nobuyoshi Araki & in the studio: pianist Rachel Cheung

      Augustine Mok Chiu-yu has been known for his social activism, and later his theatre work, since the late 1960s. In the 1970s he co-founded the influential anti-establishment “70s Biweekly” magazine. He’s long been involved in performance arts and even film, often creating works that focus on current political and social issues.
      More recently, he has also been focusing on creativity with people with disabilities.

      The 77-year old photographer Nobuyoshi Araki is one of Japan’s most influential and prolific artists. He has published over 350 books and thousands of pictures, many of which are highly sexual images of women. Many consider his photographs as erotic and even pornographic, even though earlier in his career, documenting his life with his wife, he took a much milder approach. Last month, Over the Influence gallery featured an exhibition curated by Hisako Motoo that featured over 70 photographs including 20 Polaroids and more than 50 works from Araki’s ‘Last by Leica’ series which he began in 2012.

      Locally born pianist Rachel Cheung may be just 25, but she has already made a name for herself and won many awards. Most recently she was a finalist and winner of the Audience Prize at the 2017 Van Cliburn Piano Competition. Like many classical musicians, she began young, starting to learn the piano at the age of four with the help of her piano teacher father. Graduating from the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts, with a First Class Honours in Bachelor of Music degree in Piano Performance, she went on to study with Professor Peter Frankl at the Yale School of Music on full scholarships from Yale and the Hong Kong Jockey Club Music and Dance Fund Scholarship.
      She’s in our studio talking to Ben Pelletier.

      26/07/2017