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    劇情

    STORY
    19/06/2019

    Although 21-year-old tertiary students Cheung Hoi-wing (Henry) and Chan Chi-sum (Sam) grew up in different environments, they harbour similar frustrations. They both believe our society’s current mainstream values measure a person’s worth by numbers, be it academic grades at school, or the ability to purchase a property and earn a stable income after one grows up. These expectations have put immense pressures on them, and also become a burden for an entire generation of youngsters. Both young men are hoping to find a way out. Sam, a Social Work student, is taking action to make the government aware of the pressures faced by schoolchildren, while Henry, who is pursuing a degree in Government and Public Administration, has decided to depict Hong Kong’s current situation through creative works such as novels.

    Sam is particularly concerned about the emotional problems of Hong Kong schoolchildren, because he constantly fought with his mother over his schoolwork while he was a primary and secondary student. His mother forced him to study, causing him to suffer from a mood disorder, and even to attempt suicide. Reflecting on this as a grown up, he has come to realise that she did so because she was under the influence of mainstream values, and also due to the fact that she did not know how to express her love for him. Sam and his mother actually love each other deeply, and the conflict between them was eventually resolved.

    Henry has also noticed that many social values have become distorted. Through writing horror novels, he hopes not only to release his own pent-up emotions, but also prompt the people around him to show more concern for society, thereby eliminating social indifference. He also once suffered from a mood disorder due to stress, as was the case with many of his friends. He was ultimately able to emerge from the darkness thanks to his family’s support, and also because his writing helped him work through his frustrations. His conclusion: “Young people should bravely walk their own paths, and not submit to the labels imposed on them by society.

    Assistant Producer: Chan Tsz Shan
    Director: Wong Ka Yi
    Executive Producer: Ng Wai In


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Seize the Day

      Seize the Day

      Middle age is an age for recollection. The frustrations of youth are gone, with the vicissitudes of life taking its place. Consequently, it is a time when some people choose to let go, while some choose to seize the day...

      Jenny is a married 46-year-old who has neither the courage nor desire to have children. When she was young, she witnessed members of her family fall physically and mentally ill. As a six-year-old, she would often ask, “Why are people still suffering even though they have enough to eat and a place to live? What is happiness?” At the age of 17, she met a monk and became acquainted with Buddhism for the first time. Nonetheless, she was still unable to rid herself of her discontent. After graduating from university with a major in Business Studies, she devoted herself to the IT industry. Her career took off at the speed of light, but as she chased after fame and fortune, she felt like she was an empty shell without a soul. In 2004, she decided to change her course in life and studied Clinical Psychology to become a psychologist at a social welfare institution. However, the frontline work exposed her to a lot of negative energy every day, and she could not find an emotional outlet. At one stage, she thought about escaping from Hong Kong as it was no longer the city she was familiar with. In 2015, she resolutely left what others regard as a well-paid job with great benefits to establish a mindfulness centre. The organisation promotes mindfulness, Zen meditation, carefreeness, and happiness for people of all ages, religious beliefs, and occupations. Hong Kong is currently frustrated, lost, and unhappy. Jenny believes that “mindfulness” will help Hong Kongers become aware of their pace and breathing. Is “seizing the day” an attitude towards life for middle-aged individuals or an existing option for all Hong Kongers?

      Paully is 41 years old. She is married and has a 5-year-old son and a 9-year-old daughter – a combination that others envy. In order to witness her children’s growth, she ended her small business seven years ago. Refusing the good will of her elders and the idea of hiring a domestic helper, she insisted on taking care of her offspring on her own. As her children became increasingly independent and developed their own opinions with age, Paully realised that all the parenting books and theories she had read and discussed no longer seemed to work. This led her to become more and more frustrated and confused. She kept seeing traces of herself in her children – a sense of inadequacy. Two years ago, she was exposed to Zen meditation for the first time. After meeting Jenny six months ago, she decided to adopt a laissez-faire parenting style and reconnect with her inner self. Tutoring is unnecessary, as a happy childhood is all that matters. They do not need to win or lose at the starting line either. Provided that they have a steady footing as they climb up the education ladder, they will always find a place where they belong. Paully deeply believes that the good and bad things about Hong Kong cannot be changed much on the personal level. Therefore, it is better off for her to live a carefree life, find a way out spiritually, and plant the seeds of happiness for the next generation. In her eyes, the present Hong Kong is still a very beautiful place.

      Assistant Producer: Chan Tsz Shan
      Director: Sin Wai Fan
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In

      11/07/2019
    • Against / The Flow

      Against / The Flow

      In Hong Kong, some choose to survive, following the mainstream and finding a job for the sake of subsistence. Meanwhile, some choose to live, taking the road less travelled in order to do the things they want and realise their dreams.

      The “post-80s generation” never experienced poverty, war, or social upheaval. Is this a generation of people that prefers the “unconventional” way of life?

      Jan is a 39-year-old tattoo artist. He fell in love with tattooing over a decade ago after a chance encounter. He subsequently went to Beijing to learn the craft, and has since become a professional tattoo artist, running his own shop in Hong Kong. Fusing the aesthetics of Chinese ink painting and Western painting together and using characters from horror movies, heavy metal bands, aliens, and monsters as inspiration, he has created an alternative, dark artistic style which may not be the average customer’s cup of tea. Jan has opted to be a non-conformist in his already unconventional career. Faced with realistic problems such as continually rising rental rates, how does he view today’s Hong Kong? Is this place accepting of his creativity? Is this the place of his ideals? Let us examine his story through each dot and line created by the movement of the tattoo needle and the flow of ink.

      35-year-old Cass is a locally renowned pet photographer. Having grown up in a rural village, she enjoys living with nature. What she loves even more is to make her own handicraft items from natural materials such as mud and wood. She used to be one of the “majority”, and often got into fights with her Polish husband, with whom she lives in Hong Kong, for being a workaholic. She gradually found the lifestyle in Hong Kong too hectic and oppressive. “People seem to have lost their way in this city in the face of different pressures,” she believes. Consequently, the couple has bravely given up the “mainstream” life. They have bought a piece of land in Poland’s capital, Warsaw, and are creating a “wellness village that enables the body and soul to connect with nature” with their own hands, so as to give themselves an “unconventional” reboot. They are building an earthen house from local mud to live alongside swans, hares, foxes, elks, stars, sunrises, sunsets, rivers, and the forest, taking gradual steps toward the life they truly need. However, connecting the water, electricity, and gas in Poland takes a year and a half, prompting her to reminisce how “fortunate” it is to live in Hong Kong, where people can “take things for granted”.

      Assistant Producers: Yim Pui Ying, Chan Tsz Shan
      Director: Yeung King Chuen
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In

      04/07/2019
    • At Our Best Thirty

      At Our Best Thirty

      Confucius said, “At 30, I had planted my feet firm upon the ground.”

      Society has always had specific expectations of people in their thirties. They are supposed to be educated individuals who have accumulated a certain amount of work experience, as well as responsible adults capable of taking care of their families and contributing to society.

      People who have reached the age of 30 should have a more thorough understanding of themselves, society, as well as life in general. This is also the time at which one should set the course of one’s life.

      29-year-old Alan has always had an affinity for nature. Three years ago, he resolved to resign from his fulltime job as a photography assistant, leaving behind the stable life to accomplish his goal of hiking all of the “100 Famous Japanese Mountains”. In addition to enjoying being in contact with nature, he also hopes to become a fulltime mountain guide in the future.

      Meanwhile, Catherine, who once worked in the education sector as well as the Auxiliary Police Force, decided to “just do something that she enjoyed” before turning 30. She also left her job three years ago, exchanging text books for a backpack to take a working holiday in the UK. She has since set the goal of living there for the long term.

      Having set their goals while approaching the age of 30, both youngsters are determined to realise their respective dreams.

      Assistant Producer: Yim Pui-ying
      Director: Pang Chi-man
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai-in

      27/06/2019
    • Minding My Own Business

      Minding My Own Business

      As children, we are often asked the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Typical replies by people from the previous generation would be doctors, drivers, or teachers. However, they would always give just a single answer, because they believed in the idea of focusing on doing one job well.

      In recent years, a new term – slashie – has emerged in the job market. It refers to a person who has multiple careers, and thus includes one or more slashes in their job titles: ___/___/___/___. Slashies are mostly youngsters. They don’t want to be tied down to only one job, and aspire to seek self-fulfilment in addition to making a living, so that they can enrich themselves while managing their own time.

      When it comes to career development, there is another choice: Young people in their twenties who have the vitality, determination, as well as innovation, can consider starting their own businesses, and become a boss instead of an employee.

      In this episode, Iris, Edward, and Dora, three youngsters in their twenties, will tell us about their careers, show us their working conditions, and share their views on today’s Hong Kong.

      Edward and Dora both have a master’s degree, yet are multi-tasking slashies. Edward is an editor/translator/private tutor/bassist/composer and arranger, while Dora resigned from her job as a researcher at a university so that she can plan her own time and concentrate on developing her career as a translator/calligraphy designer. Iris, on the other hand, is a young entrepreneur who runs a wedding photography business.

      An entrepreneur and two wage earners – despite working multiple jobs, the three of them have no security! Being an entrepreneur means you are on your own. Freelancing slashies enjoy neither benefits nor protection. If entrepreneurs and slashies cannot make themselves stand out from the crowd in the fiercely competitive marketplace, they will only be able to subsist on an unstable income, with no opportunities to move upstream.

      Assistant Producer: Yim Pui Ying, Joanne
      Director: Wong Sun Mei, May
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In

      20/06/2019
    • Frustrations at Age 21

      Frustrations at Age 21

      Although 21-year-old tertiary students Cheung Hoi-wing (Henry) and Chan Chi-sum (Sam) grew up in different environments, they harbour similar frustrations. They both believe our society’s current mainstream values measure a person’s worth by numbers, be it academic grades at school, or the ability to purchase a property and earn a stable income after one grows up. These expectations have put immense pressures on them, and also become a burden for an entire generation of youngsters. Both young men are hoping to find a way out. Sam, a Social Work student, is taking action to make the government aware of the pressures faced by schoolchildren, while Henry, who is pursuing a degree in Government and Public Administration, has decided to depict Hong Kong’s current situation through creative works such as novels.

      Sam is particularly concerned about the emotional problems of Hong Kong schoolchildren, because he constantly fought with his mother over his schoolwork while he was a primary and secondary student. His mother forced him to study, causing him to suffer from a mood disorder, and even to attempt suicide. Reflecting on this as a grown up, he has come to realise that she did so because she was under the influence of mainstream values, and also due to the fact that she did not know how to express her love for him. Sam and his mother actually love each other deeply, and the conflict between them was eventually resolved.

      Henry has also noticed that many social values have become distorted. Through writing horror novels, he hopes not only to release his own pent-up emotions, but also prompt the people around him to show more concern for society, thereby eliminating social indifference. He also once suffered from a mood disorder due to stress, as was the case with many of his friends. He was ultimately able to emerge from the darkness thanks to his family’s support, and also because his writing helped him work through his frustrations. His conclusion: “Young people should bravely walk their own paths, and not submit to the labels imposed on them by society.

      Assistant Producer: Chan Tsz Shan
      Director: Wong Ka Yi
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In

      19/06/2019
    • Teenage Dreams

      Teenage Dreams

      Adolescents at the age of 17 and 18 like Pamela and Hester, two young ladies living in Hong Kong, are in the prime of their youth. What dreams do they have for the future? To most people, our city values material gain and recognition above all else, and is a place where the stress of living can swallow a person whole. Despite this, they still hope to live out their dreams here.

      Pamela is an academically capable Form Five student at a traditional prestigious secondary school. For her, gaining entry into even the most difficult degree programmes at the most esteemed universities is a piece of cake. In the eyes of others, the ticket to a successful life is right in the palm of her hand. Nonetheless, she dreams of becoming a singer. She knows full well that becoming a singer will not be easy, and that making a living as one in Hong Kong is even more difficult. Which of these completely different paths will she choose?

      Meanwhile, 18-year-old Hester transferred to a non-traditional secondary school two years ago to enrol into an art diploma programme. The move has broadened her horizons and redefined her interpretation of the word “dream”. She does not believe that dreams have to be equated with one’s profession. All she wishes for is to make her favourite thing – words – a permanent part of her life. It may sound vague and abstract, but freedom from reality and the courage to create one’s own world are the most precious things about dreams, are they not?


      Assistant Producer: Chan Tsz Shan
      Director: Ma Tsz Kwan
      Executive Producer: Ng Wai In

      06/06/2019