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    監製:HA Kwai Cheong

    25/07/2021

    When LGBTs (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lose their partners, due to legal restrictions and social vision, what other problems and restrictions will they encounter when they are healing their sadness? Sister Fa and Bosco are facing the loss of their loved ones and need to deal with their deep sorrow. However, their relationships with the families of their respective partners have a close impact on the healing process.

    The attitude of her partners’ family members suddenly turn cold makes Sister Fa feel really lonely; Bosco’s relationship with his partner’s mother remains close, and it is a continuation of his relationship with his partner … How will Sister Fa and Bosco go through the darkest time after the loss of their partners? What kind of encouragement will their respective stories bring to each other?


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Would you like a Modest Death?

      Would you like a Modest Death?

      There are different kinds of funeral and burial ritual in Hong Kong. Muslims who believe in Islam choose “simple burial”, “quick burial” and “burial in the ground”. Regardless of one’s identity and status before death, one’s body is only wrapped in a white cloth after he / she dies. In just a few days, the body is buried into a pit as soon as possible without a lavish sarcophagus or a luxurious shroud, nor any grave goods.

      Muslims believe that birth is the start of death, while death is the inevitable ending of birth. Facing life and death, they will let destiny run its course. Therefore, an elderly woman who is in her eighties has cleaned dead bodies for decades fearlessly; encountering illnesses and injuries, an aged Chinese couple still sticks to their belief and faces the problem optimistically; a Pakistan youngster can hold back his grief and calmly handles it when his father passes away suddenly.

      01/08/2021
    • Till death do us part?

      Till death do us part?

      When LGBTs (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) lose their partners, due to legal restrictions and social vision, what other problems and restrictions will they encounter when they are healing their sadness? Sister Fa and Bosco are facing the loss of their loved ones and need to deal with their deep sorrow. However, their relationships with the families of their respective partners have a close impact on the healing process.

      The attitude of her partners’ family members suddenly turn cold makes Sister Fa feel really lonely; Bosco’s relationship with his partner’s mother remains close, and it is a continuation of his relationship with his partner … How will Sister Fa and Bosco go through the darkest time after the loss of their partners? What kind of encouragement will their respective stories bring to each other?

      25/07/2021
    • Gone without a Trace?

      Gone without a Trace?

      The pain of losing someone close to you to suicide often lingers for years. Ling lost one of her sons ten years ago, and yet the emotional problem suffered by her and her other son is still unexpectedly serious today. Ending your life turns out to be no solution at all, but a source of prolonged grief to your family members. Even if the pain does fade, it always leaves a trace.

      Every suicide survivor experiences grief, but the way they cope and the process vary. Dr Eddy LEE, known for his books on popular science, will explain to us. Although intellectuals are still human beings, their knowledge and observation can somehow help survivors find the silver lining out of their situation. Viewers may be able to realise something through the comparison and sharing of the experiences of two suicide survivors.

      18/07/2021
    • What is imperfectly perfect?

      What is imperfectly perfect?

      Contemplating life through learning about death is the crux of life and death education. Contemplating life means understanding the importance of cherishing life. Would we be able to have a deeper understanding of the lives of the intellectually disabled through the process?

      Yat-hung is a resident at a residential care home for the intellectually-disabled elderly who is very curious about death. Yun-mui has an unfulfilled wish in memory of her relatives. Sze-wa is eager to be take care by her elderly mother. Eva, who works at the care home, and social worker Erica help them fulfilling their wishes of being independent and respected and also enabling them to have their own closing ceremonies.

      11/07/2021
    • How to Unwind Grieve?

      How to Unwind Grieve?

      Intellectually-disabled Yuen-yee died of cancer early this year. Her younger sister So-yee loved her dearly and had been her major carer all along.

      Having witnessed Yuen-yee’s fight with the disease again and again, So-yee admired her perseverance and at the same time was heartbroken. Faced with the grief of bereavement, So-yee was offered bereavement care and support by staff members of her late sister’s residential care home – Erica, Eva, Fu-kwai, Toby and Gallery – as well as her fellow resident Hang-fong through an innovative bereavement care service that transforms the belongings of the deceased. This method of “reweaving grief” enabled So-yee to reconnect with her sister, and guided other residents as they embraced grief together and experienced its transformation.

      04/07/2021
    • When will be our Reunion?

      When will be our Reunion?

      Lost and found.

      Brittle bone disease patient Pun-lam lost a photo of her and her father taken at a racecourse twenty years ago. While she looks for the photo, she revisits the time she spent with him. It seems like it was only yesterday. Memories keep coming back, both the joyful and the sad ones. She will remember forever the day she missed saying goodbye to him.

      During her search, Pun-lam realises that many things have changed. Despite that, her love for him and the fond memories never fade. The photo may be lost, but the father-daughter love stays within Pun-lam forever.

      27/06/2021
    • Where are the footprints of Angels?

      Where are the footprints of Angels?

      Many parents who have experienced pregnancy loss call themselves “Angel’s Parents”. They firmly believe that their children will become little angels after their departure, and their families will eventually reunite in heaven.

      The “Angel’s Parents” will have to learn to live with their sorrow, and learn to turn their love of their lost children into the driving force of their lives. For them, it may be a lifetime learning process.

      After losing her child Ethan, Teresa wanted to open a social media group to seek advice from other “Angel’s Parents”, but in the end she became a core member of a mutual help organization. Not only does she resolve problems with other “Angel’s Parents”, but she also help them to strike fight for the rights they deserved in the society.

      In this episode, we will continue to follow Harriet and Steven as they return to Perth, Australia, to visit the “Angel’s Parents” there and inspire them to “turn the grief into positive energy”.

      20/06/2021
    • What is the Unspeakable Loss?

      What is the Unspeakable Loss?

      To parents who have experienced pregnancy loss, memory of their child may be limited to a photo of the foetus in its mother’s womb, a tiny footprint it left after its silent arrival to the world, and some strands of its hair. Not only are these parents unable to witness their children’s growth, but any imagined scene of playing with their children and all the pre-birth preparation work become the source of sorrow.

      In this episode, we accompany Harriet and Steven as they return to Perth, Australia, to visit some volunteers and friends there. Perth is where they lost their son Angel TSANG and realised what death was about.

      In Hong Kong, mother Soman will tell us about the story of losing her daughter Sze-chau and producing programmes at an online station, in which she exchanges experiences with parents who also suffered pregnancy loss.

      13/06/2021
    • Why was I born?

      Why was I born?

      Many orphans in the Mainland are suffering from different diseases, and some of the diseases are even incurable. If an orphan is suffering from an incurable disease, does it mean that he / she have to wait for his / her death in loneliness and pain? In Changsha, a British charitable institution and a local welfare home jointed together and opened the first ever palliative care unit for children in China, to provide humanised care for 20 orphans with incurable diseases, allowing them to feel love in their limited time.

      Registered Nurse LIN Kwok-yin, Molin, is the Director of Services and Development of “Children’s Palliative Care, Butterfly Children’s Hospices”. She has almost 20 years of experience in palliative care for children in Hong Kong. In 2017, she decided to go to the Butterfly Children’s Hospices in the Mainland on her own.

      Early this morning, she is in a hurry and takes the first high-speed train to Changsha and rush back to Butterfly Children’s Hospices, as the condition of Felix, a 3-year-old cerebral palsied orphan who has been having a high fever for more than a month, is not very optimistic …

      06/06/2021