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    監製:Diana Wan

    03/07/2020

    The controversial National Security Law is now on the statute books but considerable uncertainty remains as to how it will be implemented. Just an hour before midnight on July 1st, the details of the legislation were finally revealed and gazetted, taking immediate effect. Although Hong Kong’s has a bilingual legal system, there was no official English version when it was released. Chief Executive Carrie Lam and local officials freely admitted to having been left in the dark throughout the process.

    The four groups of crimes covered by the law are secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign countries to endanger national security. The maximum penalty for all these crimes is a life sentence. The central government has established a national security office in Hong Kong while the HKSAR government has set up a new committee chaired by the Chief Executive, and containing an adviser appointed by Beijing. Both the police force and the judiciary will establish new units to handle cases. In some instances, Beijing will have jurisdiction and suspects will face trail on the mainland. The power of interpretation is vested in the National People’s Congress Standing Committee. With us to talk about the new legislation is Maria Tam, Vice-chairman of the Basic Law Committee.


    聯絡: wanyt@rthk.hk


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Covid-19 vaccine nationalism and equity

      Covid-19 vaccine nationalism and equity

      When will we get a widely usable Covid19 vaccine? It’s been a big topic for discussion this week. On Wednesday, US President Donald Trump said it would be out by mid-October, not coincidently before the presidential election. That’s not what the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say. Its earliest estimate for vaccine readiness is middle to late 2021. Meanwhile, on Tuesday, experts in China said they will have a vaccine ready for public use as early as this November. Both China and Russia have already tested vaccines on people designated as belonging to “high risk” groups, including medical and military personnel. Early this week, the United Arab Emirates became the first country to approve one of the China-produced vaccines for emergency use. So, the race is clearly on and political pressures are playing a big role. On Thursday, Oxfam published a report showing that rich nations have already snapped up more than half of the promised output of the five leading vaccine contestants, leaving poorer countries to wait longer. To talk about the tensions between “vaccine nationalism” and health equity, especially at times like this is Yeoh Eng-kiong, Director of The Jockey Club School of Public Health & Primary Care at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

      Also in part two, virologist, David Ho, microbiologist Sridhar Siddharth and Kate Elder, Médecins Sans Frontières' senior vaccines policy advisors on Covid-19 vaccine nationalism and equity.

      18/09/2020
    • Global race for Covid-19 vaccines: a straw poll and explainer of vaccines & interview with virologist David Ho

      Global race for Covid-19 vaccines: a straw poll and explainer of vaccines & interview with virologist David Ho

      Hello and welcome to a new series of The Pulse.

      Since we were last here the coronavirus has hardly gone away, instead it has a habit of surging and falling back, which is where we are now but despite this dip in infections the government launched a universal voluntary testing programme with the backing of the Central government, which to date has proved to be markedly less than universal. And the programme has been criticised by health experts questioning its effectiveness but Chief Executive Carrie Lam was having none of it and castigated critics for a “smearing” attempt to damage relations between Hong Kong and the Mainland

      There is now a worldwide race to develop, manufacture and buy Covid-19 vaccines even before any of them have proved to be effective. This week and next, we’re looking at a number of issues concerning the Covid-19 vaccines, such as the political pressure to get vaccines developed and the question of who’s first in line to benefit. But, we begin with some background.

      11/09/2020
    • The National Security Law: Through the eyes of Maria Tam, and two of Hong Kong's non-Chinese residents

      The National Security Law: Through the eyes of Maria Tam, and two of Hong Kong's non-Chinese residents

      The controversial National Security Law is now on the statute books but considerable uncertainty remains as to how it will be implemented. Just an hour before midnight on July 1st, the details of the legislation were finally revealed and gazetted, taking immediate effect. Although Hong Kong’s has a bilingual legal system, there was no official English version when it was released. Chief Executive Carrie Lam and local officials freely admitted to having been left in the dark throughout the process.

      The four groups of crimes covered by the law are secession, subversion, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign countries to endanger national security. The maximum penalty for all these crimes is a life sentence. The central government has established a national security office in Hong Kong while the HKSAR government has set up a new committee chaired by the Chief Executive, and containing an adviser appointed by Beijing. Both the police force and the judiciary will establish new units to handle cases. In some instances, Beijing will have jurisdiction and suspects will face trail on the mainland. The power of interpretation is vested in the National People’s Congress Standing Committee. With us to talk about the new legislation is Maria Tam, Vice-chairman of the Basic Law Committee.

      03/07/2020
    • Possible impact of the National anthem & national security law on Hong Kong's education system

      Possible impact of the National anthem & national security law on Hong Kong's education system

      Some Communist Party supporters say most people in Hong Kong have no reason to worry about the human rights implications of the soon to be imposed National Security Law because it will affect only a “small number of people”. They say this while freely admitting that they haven’t seen the details of the law. Opponents of the law say its chilling effects are already being felt over a wide range of social groups and occupations. According to Secretary for Security John Lee, the law will take immediate effect once it’s passed by the National People’s Congress Standing Committee. Although preparations for enactment are proceeding behind closed doors some general principles were however revealed last Saturday by the official Xinhua news agency. The four categories of crimes to be covered by the law are: secession, subversion of state power, terrorist activities and collusion with foreign forces. Already on the statues is the National Anthem law passed earlier this month, despite strong opposition from pro-democrat legislators. It stipulates that anyone who violates or insults the March of the Volunteers may be fined up to HK$50,000 and jailed for three years.

      26/06/2020
    • COVID-19 in developing countries: India & Africa

      COVID-19 in developing countries: India & Africa

      As countries around the world are lifting lockdown measures, a second wave of Covid-19 cases has emerged in Beijing. In the past few days, the capital has recorded more than 200 new cases and locked down more than 30 communities. Once again, this outbreak is linked to a food market. Elsewhere in the world the Covid -19 pandemic is having an even more severe impact on poorer countries. For them the disease is not only a health crisis, but also has the potential to cause massive social and economic devastation. The United Nations estimates an income loss of more than US$220 billion in developing countries. In many of these nations simple preventive measures against Covid-19, such as social distancing and regularly washing hands with soap and water are not practical. 75% of citizens in the least developed world lack regular access to soap and water. In this episode, we talk to people in India and Africa who have not only been battling the virus but are also facing civil war, locusts, and crippling food shortages.

      19/06/2020
    • 612 protest one year on: protesters & the moderates

      612 protest one year on: protesters & the moderates

      On June 12th last year, the controversial Fugitive Offenders amendment bill, better known as the extradition bill, was scheduled for a second reading in Legco.
      A general strike was called on the day. Thousands of protesters gathered outside the government complex to protest. At around three in the afternoon, police started dispersing the crowd, using more than 150 rounds of tear gas, beanbags and rubber bullets. It marked a turning point in the protests that, one year on, have not gone away. However the extradition bill has been shelved. But a high level of tension persists in the wake of the new national anthem law and the pending national security legislation, not forgetting the on-going Covid-19 pandemic. We talked to some Hongkongers to see how these issues have impacted them.

      12/06/2020
    • National security law discussion with Elsie Leung & June 4th candlelight vigil banned by police

      National security law discussion with Elsie Leung & June 4th candlelight vigil banned by police

      The Chief Executive Carrie Lam and a group of legal and security officials have just come back from meetings in Beijing to discuss the proposed national security legislation with vice-premier Han Zhen and other officials. Lam said the central authorities intend to “firmly, comprehensively and faithfully” implement “One Country, Two Systems” and “resolutely” safeguard national security. She said that the central government will be listening to opinions from Hong Kong people. That same day, the United Kingdom’s prime minister Boris Johnson pledged that if China proceeds with the national security law, Britain will change immigration rules for some three million British National Overseas passport holders in Hong Kong granting a pathway to citizenship. With us to talk about the proposed law is Elsie Leung, former Deputy Director of the Hong Kong Basic Law Committee of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of the People’s Republic of China.

      It’s thirty-one years since the June 4th crackdown in Tiananmen Square but at least in Hong Kong, memories remain sharp. The annual vigil in Victoria Park to commemorate the deaths in 1989 is often seen as a barometer of Hong Kong’s freedoms. The future of that vigil is now in question. This year social distancing regulations were given as a reason for the banning the event – but the pending national security legislation may well lead to a longer term ban.

      05/06/2020
    • HK National Security Law discussion: Exco non-official member, Ronny Tong & last governor Chris Patten

      HK National Security Law discussion: Exco non-official member, Ronny Tong & last governor Chris Patten

      Hong Kong now has a new national security law crafted and implemented in Beijing without the involvement of either the SAR’s government or legislature. Enacted on Thursday by the National People’s Congress without debate, it was the result of years of frustration in Beijing over the failure of Hong Kong itself to introduce a law on these lines. The unprecedented move led to an outpouring of local and international criticism accompanied by dire warnings that this legislation effectively puts an end to the notion of “One Country, Two Systems”. On Wednesday, a day before the National People’s Congress put the draft resolution to a vote, the US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo declared that Hong Kong no longer has autonomy from China. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China in the HKSAR replied that it is “utterly imperious, unreasonable and shameless” for American politicians to obstruct the legislation. Chief Executive Carrie Lam labelled foreign criticism as “double standards and hypocrisy”.

      With us to talk about the Hong Kong national security law is non-official member of the Executive Council, Ronny Tong. We also spoke to the last governor Chris Patten from London.

      29/05/2020
    • IPCC thematic study: discussion with Clement Chan of IPCC & in memory of Allen Lee

      IPCC thematic study: discussion with Clement Chan of IPCC & in memory of Allen Lee

      After much delay the Independent Police Complaints Council released its report on the police handling of the anti-extradition bill protest. The government has resisted widespread public demands for an independent inquiry and insisted that this report would provide a definitive account of what happened. There was scepticism before the report was released and its publication has done more or less nothing to make the controversy go away. With us to talk about the Independent Police Complaints Council’s latest report is Clement Chan, the Chairman of the Council’s publicity and survey committee.

      Politician and founder of the Liberal Party Allen Lee passed away on 15th May. He played a leading role in Hong Kong’s politics for some 30 years decades, not least during the Sino-British negotiations and, later, in the drafting of the Basic Law.

      22/05/2020
    • HK press freedom: discussion with HKJA Chris Yeung & RSF Cédric Alviani & the suspension of social welfare services during Covid19

      HK press freedom: discussion with HKJA Chris Yeung & RSF Cédric Alviani & the suspension of social welfare services during Covid19

      Many families were out last Sunday celebrating Mother’s Day. In some cases, it was their first chance to get together after the partial relaxation of social distancing rules.
      Many restaurants and shopping malls were relieved to see customers coming back. Young people were also back in several shopping malls for “singalong” protests.
      They – and many families just out for the day - were met by riot police. Protests and confrontations continued through the night in the streets of Mong Kok, where journalists faced a new level of hostility from the police. With us to talk about the pressure on press freedom in Hong Kong are, Cédric Alviani the East Asia Bureau Head of Reporters Without Borders, who is speaking to us from Taiwan in the studio we have Chris Yeung, Chairperson of the Hong Kong Journalists Association

      Last week, we reported the problems relatives face looking after family members during the coronavirus outbreak. However, not all of those with physical disabilities or other impairments have family members to care for them. They rely heavily on government or subvented organisations to provide assistance on a daily basis. However many of those welfare services have been cut posing even greater difficulties during the pandemic.

      15/05/2020