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    監製:Diana Wan

    24/09/2022

    Artist Chu Hing-wah, who we last featured in 2017 during his exhibition at the Hanart TZ Gallery. And he wasn’t just revealing his painting talents. He was also demonstrating another passion of his: singing Cantonese opera at the exhibition opening. This year he’s 87, and he’s still painting.

    Since the late 1960s, leading printmaker and photographer Noda Tetsuya has created an ongoing series of prints under the title, “Diary”. Produced over almost fifty years, it consists of some five hundred works. They include portraits of his family, landscapes, images based on his travels, and records of objects from daily life. On show at the University Museum and Art Gallery of The University of Hong Kong are works from that “Diary” series. Tetsuya combines photography, traditional Japanese woodblock printing, mimeograph duplication, silkscreen printing and layering to not only show an individual world but to also reflect a wider social perspective.

    In May 2017, Rémi Geniet came to our studio to talk about his then upcoming concert with the Hong Kong Sinfonietta of Rachmaninoff’s most popular work, his Piano Concerto No. 2. He’s now back in Hong Kong and on Saturday he’s performing again with the orchestra. This time they are playing Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 1. He’s also doing a recital with violinist Aylen Pritchin. He’s with us now.


    聯絡: wanyt@rthk.hk


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Artists' impression of a sawmill, Wong Hau-kwei's exhibition & in the studio: Jing Wong

      Artists' impression of a sawmill, Wong Hau-kwei's exhibition & in the studio: Jing Wong

      In the 1950s and 1960s, Hong Kong was known around the world for making and exporting textile, plastic, clothing, and even wood products. In terms of wood crafts, local factories and artisans specialised in, among other things, shipbuilding, furniture production, and woodworking. That began to change from the 1970s, as more and more manufacturing relocated to the Pearl River Delta. Now, one of the few remaining woodwork factories in Hong Kong faces closure.

      Wong Hau-kwei’s paintings combine traditional Chinese ink and wash techniques, with modern aesthetics and forms. “Never abandon tradition,” he has said, “and never give up reforming.” Wong, who moved to Hong Kong in 1978, draws inspiration from a wide variety of subjects and scenery, but he also finds plenty of inspiration in Hong Kong’s own environment, both urban and natural. On show at Artspace K the solo exhibition “Serenity Hong Kong” features 23 of his works.

      Singer-songwriter and theatre practitioner Jing Wong last came to the show in 2015 to tell us about his then new EP, “How to Disappear”. At that point he was turning away from his earlier folk-rock music style to what he called, “book rock”, a rawer and more powerful way of using the guitar. Seven years later, he’s here with us again.

      01/10/2022
    • Chu Hing-wah:

      Chu Hing-wah: "Bare Life", Noda Tetsuya’s "Diary"@HKU & in the studio: pianist Rémi Geniet

      Artist Chu Hing-wah, who we last featured in 2017 during his exhibition at the Hanart TZ Gallery. And he wasn’t just revealing his painting talents. He was also demonstrating another passion of his: singing Cantonese opera at the exhibition opening. This year he’s 87, and he’s still painting.

      Since the late 1960s, leading printmaker and photographer Noda Tetsuya has created an ongoing series of prints under the title, “Diary”. Produced over almost fifty years, it consists of some five hundred works. They include portraits of his family, landscapes, images based on his travels, and records of objects from daily life. On show at the University Museum and Art Gallery of The University of Hong Kong are works from that “Diary” series. Tetsuya combines photography, traditional Japanese woodblock printing, mimeograph duplication, silkscreen printing and layering to not only show an individual world but to also reflect a wider social perspective.

      In May 2017, Rémi Geniet came to our studio to talk about his then upcoming concert with the Hong Kong Sinfonietta of Rachmaninoff’s most popular work, his Piano Concerto No. 2. He’s now back in Hong Kong and on Saturday he’s performing again with the orchestra. This time they are playing Brahms’ Piano Concerto No. 1. He’s also doing a recital with violinist Aylen Pritchin. He’s with us now.

      24/09/2022
    • Dunhuang art at Heritage Museum, Chris Cheung's

      Dunhuang art at Heritage Museum, Chris Cheung's "Orbstellar Metaspace" & in the studio: Jason Kui

      Dunhuang, in the Western part of China’s Gansu province, is located on an important Silk Road crossroads. Between 500 and 1,000 AD, it was a key Buddhist centre. Carved into the cliffs, the Mogao Caves, of which 492 are currently preserved, house some of the most spectacular Buddhist art from the 4th to the 14th century. You can see some of the treasures of Dunhuang art right now in an exhibition at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum.

      If you’re a bit bored with life on planet Earth, maybe a trip into another dimension of our galaxy will excite you. And you don’t need to book a seat with private spaceflight companies such as Space X nor Blue Origin. Just pop down to Pacific Place in Admiralty. Chris Cheung’s “Orbstellar Metaspace” is an immersive interstellar journey. Using art and technologies such as NFTs, Cheung has created an installation that invites the audience to immerse themselves in a new galaxy and even design their own orbs.

      Guitarist Jason Kui last came to our studio two years ago to talk about his new album, “Naka”. Last year, he released a new single, “Sky Rush”. As a guitarist in many styles, a composer and a producer, Kui says that making music as a career is hard, even more so when you are making instrumental music, and more so still when you are making instrumental music in Hong Kong. In his concert “Six-String Journey to the West” next Friday, Kui wants to take the audience with him on his guitar journey. He’s here to tell us more.

      17/09/2022
    • WMA exhibition “Island(ed)” & photographic artist Simon Wan & in the studio: Yao Yueh Chinese Music Association

      WMA exhibition “Island(ed)” & photographic artist Simon Wan & in the studio: Yao Yueh Chinese Music Association

      Apart from the Kowloon Peninsula, Hong Kong is made up of 263 islands, including of course Hong Kong Island. Many of us may have even visited some of the other larger islands such as Lamma, Lantau and Cheung Chau, but many more are small and uninhabited. The WMA Programme, a non-profit platform, focuses on increasing understanding of Hong Kong through the lens-based art form. In one of its current projects, “‘Island(ed)’ four local artists explore some of these isolated islands. One of those taking part is photographer, Simon Wan.

      Founded in 1974, the Yao Yueh Chinese Music Association is 80-piece orchestra. The association aims to promote Chinese music and original works by Hong Kong composers. Two years ago, the association created a mixed orchestra that combines Western and Chinese instruments. This Sunday at the Hong Kong City Hall, the orchestra is giving a concert called, “A Thousand Colours”, featuring works by Hong Kong composers. The concert’s conductor and some of the orchestra members are with us right now.

      10/09/2022
    • Pipilotti Rist

      Pipilotti Rist "Behind Your Eyelid"@Tai Kwun & in the studio: "HK Int’l Flute Festival Gala Concert

      Pipilotti Rist’s creative output has, over the years, expanded from her early video works to recent large-scale moving-image installations. She has described video as “back glass paintings”, and says that nowadays, “we put all knowledge, feelings, history behind flat screens”. What she wants to do in her work is free those images and bring them back into our bodies and senses, to encourage us to look at the world with an open eye and from new perspectives. Visitors can, metaphorically at least, get under Rist’s skin in her first solo exhibition in Hong Kong, “Behind Your Eyelid” at Tai Kwun.

      At the City Hall next Monday, the concert “Flute Sketches”, organised by the Hong Kong International Flute Association, combines music and images to tell a range of stories.
      The programme includes pieces from both the contemporary and classical flute repertoire. Four of the performers are with me right now to tell us more.

      03/09/2022
    • HKBUAVA & CUHK graduation shows & in the studio: Harpists Dan Yu & Lau Yee Yeung

      HKBUAVA & CUHK graduation shows & in the studio: Harpists Dan Yu & Lau Yee Yeung

      Every year, as schools or universities end their semesters for the summer holidays, a new batch of students graduates with fresh hopes, ambitions, and ideals.
      Before they end their studies though, Hong Kong’s undergraduate art students present their work in their graduation shows. In June, we visited two: the graduation shows of Hong Kong Baptist University and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and talked to a few young creators.

      One of the world’s oldest instruments, the harp is part of both folk and classical traditions. It helps its listeners celebrate, heal, relax, and even mourn. Next week, the City Chamber Orchestra of Hong Kong is putting on a concert featuring two harps, focusing on the instrument’s long association with stars, angels, and the celestial world. Harpists Dan Yu and Lau Yee Yeung are here to tell me more about the programme, which features music by classical and contemporary composers.

      27/08/2022
    • Summer Music Special II – Piano: Johnny Yim, Ted Lo & Chris Carpio

      Summer Music Special II – Piano: Johnny Yim, Ted Lo & Chris Carpio

      Last week, in the first of our two summer music specials, we featured new music from two local ensembles, Teriver Cheung’s Transience Ensemble and neo-chamber group Sea Island & Ferry. This week, we focus on the piano, one of the most played instruments, and one for which, and on which, much music is written and composed. Later on, we have a little extra for you from two pianists: Ted Lo, widely known as the “godfather” of jazz in Hong Kong, and Chris Carpio, both of whom recently joined us in our studio. First though, we’re talking to arranger, producer and pianist Johnny Yim. He’s well known for his work on the Cantopop scene, and he has a classic Cantopop concert with the Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra coming up in September.

      In June, guitarist Eugene Pao and his jazz buddies, including pianist Ted Lo and others from the younger generation of musicians, performed an opening concert for, “Jazz in the Neighbourhood”, a four-year project bringing jazz to Tsuen Wan. It also marked the launch of both a new album from Eugene and Ted’s first solo album. The Tsuen Wan jazz project also included a concert in which pianist Chris Carpio paid tribute to his dad Tony’s band that used to play regularly in the Dickens Bar of the former Excelsior hotel. While they were in our studios, both Ted and Chris played a little something extra for us.

      20/08/2022
    • Summer Music Special I – New Music: Teriver Cheung & Sotoc & Sea Island and Ferry

      Summer Music Special I – New Music: Teriver Cheung & Sotoc & Sea Island and Ferry

      This week and next, we’re dedicating the whole show to music, and – more specifically – performances by guests in our studio, something to help you sit back and relax in the comfort of your own home on these hot summer days. Today, we’re focusing on new music. In part two of the show, we’ll visit the Hong Kong Museum of Art to see an exhibition for which neo-chamber ensemble, Sea Island & Ferry composed original music. First though, someone who shouldn’t need much introduction as we’ve been following his music career since he returned from New York a long time ago. Guitarist and composer Teriver Cheung is here to tell us about a new album he’s co-written with fellow music director Sotoc.

      At the Hong Kong Museum of Art, as part of a celebration of the museum’s 60th anniversary, the current exhibition “In-Between” combines works from four of the museum’s core collections with new ones by contemporary artists and designers. To accompany the exhibition, the ensemble Sea Island & Ferry was invited to compose and perform six original music pieces. They introduced one in our studio in June. While they were here, they also played an additional piece, “Enter/Exit”, composed for the artwork close to the exhibition entrance.

      13/08/2022
    • MOA x Capodimonte:

      MOA x Capodimonte: "The Road to the Baroque", Christopher Ku@Illuminati & in the studio: pianist Jason Wong

      With many Covid travel restrictions remaining in place, taking a summer vacation, or enjoying art outside of Hong Kong, can still be a challenge this year. But if you are a lover of European art, a current exhibition of Baroque and pre-Baroque masters at the Hong Kong Museum of Art may be a breath of fresh air.

      "Painting of Reverberation” is a two-part exhibition by Christopher Ku at Illuminati Fine Art. Ku says he sees his work as being like “reincarnation; it looks back at everything that has happened without any contention”. The first part of the show, the “Reverberation” series, ended on 15th July. Currently on show is the second part, the “Semantic Construction” series, which focuses on the future of painting, keeping the creative process alive, and being innovative.

      Pianist Jason Wong trained under Gabriel Kwok, Head of Keyboard Studies at the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. Awarded a full scholarship, he went on to further his studies at the Royal College of Music in London. As a classical pianist, he has already garnered many international prizes and made his debut at the Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall in New York in 2017. He recently returned to Hong Kong from his studies. A few weeks ago, before Ben Pelletier left for his summer break, he came to our studio.

      06/08/2022
    • Porcelain artist Lam Duen Shan Ming, “Nothing Like the Taste of Print”@Hanart & in the studio: Saxophonist Timothy Sun

      Porcelain artist Lam Duen Shan Ming, “Nothing Like the Taste of Print”@Hanart & in the studio: Saxophonist Timothy Sun

      Guangzhou painted porcelain or Guangcai is hand-painted glazed porcelain developed by Guangzhou craftsmen in the Qing dynasty. At the time, Guangzhou was the only trading port in China open to other countries, and the porcelain, designed for overseas markets, was designed as an export product that combined elements from Eastern and Western cultures. Its production was once a major export industry, but today there are fewer than a hundred masters remaining in Guangzhou, and less than a handful in Hong Kong. And not many young people are interested in learning the traditional skills.

      On show at Hanart TZ Gallery, the group exhibition “Nothin’ Like the Taste of Print” features 21 emerging Hong Kong printmakers who work with varied techniques that include relief printing, intaglio, and stencil. Organised in collaboration with printmaking studio MarblePrintClay, the exhibition examines the semantic aspects of the term “print” itself, including the activity of printing, and the different creative approaches and techniques adopted.

      Timothy Sun studied saxophone and clarinet at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Today he’s well recognised in Hong Kong, Macau and internationally. As a chamber musician, he has performed at the Carnegie Hall, Wigmore Hall and the Barbican Centre. He has also collaborated with dancers, choreographers and multimedia artists. Next month, he is launching his debut solo album of ten new songs composed by local composers and an accompanying concert. He’s here with me now.

      30/07/2022