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RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

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    監製:Diana Wan


    RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

    "The Pulse" is presented by locally and internationally known journalist and writer Steve Vines.

    Its focus? The latest events and trends that affect Hong Kong - from the corridors of power and business boardrooms, to the streets and dai pai dongs.

    "The Pulse" is politics. What's happening in the Legislative Council and on the streets right now.

    "The Pulse" is the media, informing us how well or badly our press and broadcast organisations diagnose and reflect the society around us.

    "The Pulse" is insightful, in-depth reports and interviews on current issues - examining those issues in depth, looking behind and beyond the news.

    Its focus is on the timely. The Now.

    Keep your eye ... and your finger ... on "The Pulse".

    If you want to discuss anything you've seen in "The Pulse", or anything in the public eye right now, or just to talk about the show, why not join in the debate on our Facebook page, RTHK's The Pulse. 

    Starting 3 April, the programme is aired every Friday on RTHK 31 at 19:30. 

    We're on Facebook
    RTHK's The Pulse https://www.facebook.com/RTHK.Pulse/
    Instagram @rthkthepulse
    Twitter @thepulse_rthk https://twitter.com/thepulse_rthk 

    Archive available later after broadcast. ** Please note that the programme air-time on TV is different with webcast time.

    最新

    LATEST
    15/01/2021

    As we enter a second year under the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic, many countries are seeing infection surges and mounting deaths. A key element in countering the spread of the virus is contact tracing to identify the source of infections following the discovery of a coronavirus patient. A wide range of digital tools have been developed for this purpose by governments, businesses and even ordinary citizens. But as with many new technologies, the first and foremost concern for some is data security and privacy. To talk about the Leave Home Safe mobile application is Tony Wong, Deputy Government Chief Information Officer.

    Wo Chai Hill, also known as Bishop Hill, is a small hill in Shek Kip Mei. The site covers one of several underground service reservoirs in Kowloon. For local residents, it’s also a rare urban green recreational space. Shortly before the end of last year, as demolition work on one underground reservoir started, a century-old 4,300 square metre gem came to light. And it wasn’t government officials or government experts that came to the rescue.

    預告

    UPCOMING
    22/01/2021

    RTHK's English-language current affairs programme that takes "The Pulse" of Hong Kong ... and the world around it.

    "The Pulse" is presented by locally and internationally known journalist and writer Steve Vines.

    Its focus? The latest events and trends that affect Hong Kong - from the corridors of power and business boardrooms, to the streets and dai pai dongs.

    "The Pulse" is politics. What's happening in the Legislative Council and on the streets right now.

    "The Pulse" is the media, informing us how well or badly our press and broadcast organisations diagnose and reflect the society around us.

    "The Pulse" is insightful, in-depth reports and interviews on current issues - examining those issues in depth, looking behind and beyond the news.

    Its focus is on the timely. The Now.

    Keep your eye ... and your finger ... on "The Pulse".

    If you want to discuss anything you've seen in "The Pulse", or anything in the public eye right now, or just to talk about the show, why not join in the debate on our Facebook page, RTHK's The Pulse.

    重溫

    CATCHUP
    11 - 01
    2020 - 2021
    RTHK 31
    • Interview with Tony Wong of OGCIO on Leave Home Safe mobile app & Bishop Hill Reservoir

      Interview with Tony Wong of OGCIO on Leave Home Safe mobile app & Bishop Hill Reservoir

      As we enter a second year under the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic, many countries are seeing infection surges and mounting deaths. A key element in countering the spread of the virus is contact tracing to identify the source of infections following the discovery of a coronavirus patient. A wide range of digital tools have been developed for this purpose by governments, businesses and even ordinary citizens. But as with many new technologies, the first and foremost concern for some is data security and privacy. To talk about the Leave Home Safe mobile application is Tony Wong, Deputy Government Chief Information Officer.

      Wo Chai Hill, also known as Bishop Hill, is a small hill in Shek Kip Mei. The site covers one of several underground service reservoirs in Kowloon. For local residents, it’s also a rare urban green recreational space. Shortly before the end of last year, as demolition work on one underground reservoir started, a century-old 4,300 square metre gem came to light. And it wasn’t government officials or government experts that came to the rescue.

      15/01/2021
    • Mass arrest of 53 democrats: interview with Lau Siu-kai & Lo Kin-hei; Geoffrey Ma's retirement & interview w/ Henry Litton on judicial reform

      Mass arrest of 53 democrats: interview with Lau Siu-kai & Lo Kin-hei; Geoffrey Ma's retirement & interview w/ Henry Litton on judicial reform

      Interview with Lau Siu-kai and Lo Kin-hei on the mass arrest of 53 pro-democracy figures, Chief Justice Geoffrey Ma's retirement and interview with Henry Litton on judicial reform

      08/01/2021
    • Covid-19 vaccine discussion: David Hui, government health expert on Covid-19 & Alex Lam, Chairman of HK Patients' Voices

      Covid-19 vaccine discussion: David Hui, government health expert on Covid-19 & Alex Lam, Chairman of HK Patients' Voices

      Happy new year and welcome to The Pulse.

      2020 has been a year that many will be happy to see go. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought great disruption and many losses, both personally and economically, all around the world. We’ve all had to adapt to new ways of living and behaving because of the virus, and the coronavirus lifestyle: social distancing, mask wearing, working from home, and communicating, teaching and learning over Zoom will continue in 2021.
      The World Health Organization has received reports of almost 1.8 million deaths from Covid-19 around the world, even as scientists raced to develop a vaccine. And the vaccine arrived with unprecedented speed, with news of the first approval of a Covid-19 vaccine announced in the United Kingdom in December. Inoculation programmes are already under way in some countries. With me to talk about the Covid-19 vaccine situation in Hong Kong are David Hui, Head of the Division of Respiratory Medicine at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, who’s also a government health expert on Covid-19 and Alex Lam, Chairman of Hong Kong Patients' Voices.

      01/01/2021
    • Looking back at 2020

      Looking back at 2020

      Hello and welcome to The Pulse. And from all of us here, best wishes to you for this holiday season. There are still a few days left, but so far 2020 has been a year unlike any other in recent history- and that’s putting it mildy. Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary has designated “pandemic” as the word of the year, and you can see why. Oxford dictionaries report that searches for the word increased by 57,000%. As the pandemic intensified and lockdowns were enforced in most countries, “coronavirus” became the most searched term on the internet according to Google analytics data. Hong Kong, of course, has had more than Covid-19 to deal with. The aftermath of the social unrest in 2019 and the introduction of the new National Security Law have drastically changed the socio-political landscape. This week, we look at what 2020 has meant to four people from different walks of life.

      25/12/2020
    • Hong Kong's academic freedom & Long Time No Chat: Calling Los Angeles

      Hong Kong's academic freedom & Long Time No Chat: Calling Los Angeles

      Chief Executive Carrie Lam says the introduction of the National Security Law has been “remarkably effective in restoring stability”. Meanwhile, Zhang Xiaoming, deputy director of China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office said last month that more reforms will be needed in several areas including the SAR’s mini constitution, the judicial system, national education, something called “oath optimisation” and “qualification screening” for civil servants. Article 137 of the Basic Law guarantees that education institutions will retain their autonomy and enjoy academic freedom. Article 4 of the National Security Law says it will respect and guarantee HK people’s human rights and freedoms under the Basic Law and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. In light of all this we talked to some academics about where we are now – after the introduction of the National Security Law.

      After more than a month of abortive legal actions and recounting of votes in last month’s US presidential election Donald Trump is still refusing to concede. Yet the Electoral College affirmed President-elect Joe Biden’s win on Monday. Biden received 306 electoral college votes, 36 more than the 270 he needed to win. Donald Trump received 232. In terms of the popular vote, Biden defeated Trump by more than seven million votes. But what are the long-term effects of Trump’s refusal to accept the outcome? And where does this leave the growing political divide in America. In the second episode of our “Long Time No Chat” mini-series, we look at some of the effects of politics on human relationships in the United States and here in Hong Kong.

      18/12/2020
    • Hong Kong Media discussion with Francis Lee of CUHK Journalism & Comm. & Tom Grundy, Editor-in-Chief of HKFP

      Hong Kong Media discussion with Francis Lee of CUHK Journalism & Comm. & Tom Grundy, Editor-in-Chief of HKFP

      The relationship between the media, the government and law enforcement has become increasingly volatile and tense since last year’s social unrest, even more so since the enactment of the National Security Law. Among the Incidents that have caused concern are the August police raid on Apple Daily, and later the arrest of its owner Jimmy Lai, who is currently remanded pending trail in April. In this instance he is facing fraud charges, with even more serious charges in the pipeline.
      There was also the September announcement that the police would stop recognising the press credentials of many journalists. They say they will only accept accreditation from government-registered outlets and “internationally known” foreign media. In November, RTHK producer Bao Choy was arrested on charges of making a false statement to obtain vehicle licence information from a public database while investigating the Yuen Long MTR attack. Then came more recent events at the broadcaster i-Cable. After a management reshuffle in August, followed by a request for staff to take unpaid leave and the firing of three senior engineers, the company then sacked a further 40 members of staff with immediate effect, including the entire investigative news team. In protest, the whole China news team resigned.

      With us to talk about the current media situation are Francis Lee, Director of Chinese University of Hong Kong School of Journalism and Communication, and Tom Grundy, Editor-in-chief of Hong Kong Free Press.

      11/12/2020
    • Interview with Andrew Heyn, UK British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macau

      Interview with Andrew Heyn, UK British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macau

      In her fourth Policy Address delivered last week, Chief Executive Carrie Lam dedicated a lengthy chapter to upholding “One Country, Two Systems” and stressed the need for constitutional order. She said that to fully implement the concept formulated by former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, requires strict adherence to the Constitution and the Basic Law. Mrs Lam reiterated that there can be no challenge to rulings by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on implementation of the Basic law.
      The Joint Declaration, signed in 1984, set out a set of a range of principles which were to remain unchanged for 50 years after 1997.There are different interpretations of how that has worked out and to get the British point of view I am pleased to welcome Andrew Heyn, who is winding up his role as British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macao this week.

      04/12/2020
    • Policy Address 2020 discussion with: Liberal Party James Tien & Democratic Party Wu Chi-wai

      Policy Address 2020 discussion with: Liberal Party James Tien & Democratic Party Wu Chi-wai

      On Wednesday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivered her delayed Policy Address to a half-empty Legislative Council chamber. Opposition members had boycotted the session.
      The first part of the title of the Address “Striving Ahead” is a phrase frequently used by Chinese President Xi Jinping in his speeches. Lam detailed the support the Central Government has given the HKSAR and the results she says she achieved during her recent visit to Beijing. The Chief Executive also said it was the first time in 23 years that a specific chapter had been dedicated to upholding “One Country, Two Systems”. In that chapter, she said there is a need to restore Hong Kong’s constitutional order and political system from chaos caused by an inadequate understanding of the Constitution and the Basic Law and by ill-intentioned people influenced by external forces.

      With me to talk about the Policy Address are the Honorary Chair of the Liberal Party, James Tien, and the Chairman of the Democratic Party, Wu Chi-wai.

      27/11/2020
    • China's new antitrust guidelines on Fintech discussion with Anjani Trivedi & relabeling of

      China's new antitrust guidelines on Fintech discussion with Anjani Trivedi & relabeling of "Made in HK" to "Made in China"

      As an African proverb goes, when elephants fight it is the grass that suffers. Currently, Hong Kong is finding itself in the position of that grass. Starting this month, locally-made goods can no longer be exported to the United States with the label “Made in Hong Kong”. More on that later.

      But first, tech giants such as Apple, Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft have dominated the world for decades. Today though, so-called “platform” companies and the “platform economy” are in the ascendant. One research report by McKinsey suggests more than 30% of global economic activity - some US$60 trillion - could be mediated by digital platforms within the next six years. And that concerns regulators everywhere, including in mainland China, where the government worries that digital platform companies such as Tencent, and Alibaba and its affiliated Ant Group, could be getting too big and too influential.

      As his presidential term started, Donald Trump was sometimes full of praises for Chinese President Xi Jinping. Later though, he changed tack, accusing China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft and initiating a trade war with China in 2018. The US has since imposed hefty tariffs on Chinese goods, and China has naturally retaliated. In January, both sides called a truce, but Hong Kong has been caught in the US-China crossfire. Since the introduction of the National Security Law in May, the United States has revoked Hong Kong’s special trade status and imposed sanctions on top local and mainland officials. And starting this month, the “Made in Hong Kong” label is no longer allowed on locally-made goods exported to the US.

      20/11/2020
    • Disqualification and mass resignation of pro-democracy lawmakers discussion: James To & Junius Ho; & US election public polls

      Disqualification and mass resignation of pro-democracy lawmakers discussion: James To & Junius Ho; & US election public polls

      Wednesday’s decision by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress makes it clear that Hong Kong must be governed by people Beijing considers to be patriots. The resolution, citing activities endangering national security, paved the way for the Hong Kong government to disqualify four pro-democrat lawmakers, Alvin Yeung, Dennis Kwok, Kwok Ka-ki and Kenneth Leung based on their actions in promoting or supporting Hong Kong independence, refusing to swear allegiance to the HKSAR and abide by the Basic Law, and appealing to foreign forces to interfere in local affairs. The top body says these are not only legal requirements but also the political conditions for existing members and future candidates to run as legislative councillors. Chief Executive Carrie Lam says she asked for Beijing’s ruling because she was facing a constitutional problem that Hong Kong’s courts couldn’t handle. Just hours after the disqualifications, 15 remaining pro-democracy legislators announced their resignations en masse. Despite the departure of so many elected opposition legislators, the Chief Executive says it would be unfair to assume LegCo will become a rubber stamp assembly. Earlier today, I spoke to Junius Ho and James To, one of the legislators who has just resigned.

      It’s more than a week since Election Day in the United States, and votes are still being counted. By last Saturday though, as 279 electoral college votes were estimated for Joe Biden and 217 for Donald Trump, it was pretty clear who had won. To date, Donald Trump is still refusing to concede, insisting the election was fraudulent, as least in states where he lost, and using government machinery to slow any transition to a new presidency. Realistically though, it’s all over bar the angry tweeting. Once the count is complete, President-elect Biden is expected to be over five million votes ahead of Trump in the popular vote.
      But one thing is clear: the election was much more of a nail-biter than polls had predicted. And many are assessing how much, and why, the pollsters missed the mark again.

      13/11/2020
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