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    監製:Gillian Yau

    13/05/2024
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    Becoming a professional footballer in Hong Kong is no easy task already. For ethnic minorities, it is even more of a far-fetched dream. Meet Naveed, who was born in Pakistan and settled in Hong Kong at the age of five. Football was never a part of his early life, until he started joining the games in parks in Kwun Tong, and later joined the youth team of a local club "Eastern Long Lions". Slowly but surely, he discovered his passion. Along his journey, he grappled with questions like, "What can someone like me really achieve?"

    Despite bearing expectations from his family and encountering language barriers, he persevered and steadily climbed the ladder to becoming a pro player. Naveed's goal is to one day play for the representative team of Hong Kong. What does football mean to him? What challenges do ethnic minorities encounter in their journey to becoming professional players?

    And how do Naveed's teammates see him as an ethnic minority player? Join host Karan Cholia as they hit the pitch together.


    集數

    EPISODES
    • It’s ok to feel sad

      It’s ok to feel sad

      Anyone can experience varying degrees of emotional distress, and if one does not receive appropriate assistance, the situation may become more difficult to manage by the minute. For someone living in a place with language barriers and cultural differences, how can one emerge from the shadows when dealing with emotional challenges?

      Nayyar, a Pakistani woman who has been living in Hong Kong for 26 years since her marriage, is a mother of four. In recent years, she experienced the loss of friends and family members, encountered marital issues, and her youngest son was severely injured in a traffic accident. She began experiencing despair and emotional distress. Later, when volunteers came through with anti-epidemic supplies, she learnt about counselling services and decided to reach out and seek help. Through counselling, Nayyar learnt emotional management, and gradually regained her confidence. She now understands the importance of self-love and has developed a closer bond with her children.

      In this episode, our host Omme chats with Nayyar and her family. Ethnic minority mental health counsellors and outreach social workers also share insights on identifying individuals in need of assistance, raising awareness for cultural sensitivity, and making them feel comfortable enough to open up about the challenges they are facing.

      17/06/2024
    • We are Baba

      We are Baba

      Minhas Rashad, who came to Hong Kong in the 1980s, has lived in Hong Kong for over 30 years. Fluent in Cantonese, he masters the language's colloquialisms and brings joy to neighbourhood residents with his local humour. He has four sons, aged 14 to 26. As far as raising children goes, he has his own set of theories. He thinks Hong Kong parents attach too much importance to their children's academic results. For him, nothing is more important than a happy childhood for his sons. He gives them a lot of freedom to realise their potentials. While Father’s Day is not celebrated in Pakistan, for him, every day is Father’s Day.

      Shokat Nawaz, the father of our Pakistani host Omme, came to Hong Kong in 1990 and attended school in the city. For his daughter, he is an unconventional Pakistani father. He hoped his daughter Omme could learn Chinese properly in secondary school and so transferred her to a mainstream school. He also encouraged her to study hard and give back to the community in future. Omme thinks her father is very open and has a great deal of respect for him.

      The two Pakistani fathers have lived in Hong Kong for many years – their children were all born and bred in Hong Kong.

      Father's Day is approaching, they will share with us the stories of them and their children.

      10/06/2024
    • You are my energy

      You are my energy

      Tracy Wong, in her early 20s, was born with cerebral palsy. As she has limited mobility, she uses a wheelchair to get ground and has attended special schools since she was small. Two years ago, she fell in love with Mirror member Anson Lo, drawn to his positive attitude. Tracy used to have negative thoughts, but Lo, who is always positive and constantly taking on challenges, has given her positive energy. She goes on photo-taking excursions with her friend Anna, who also has limited mobility. She once went to a shopping centre early in the morning to attend an event, but such activities are not easy for wheelchair users.

      Marish came to Hong Kong from the Philippines in 2017 as a foreign domestic helper for Anna’s family. Since she spends a lot of time with Anna, she is also drawn to Mirror and likes Keung To most. She loves music from different countries, such as the Korean boy band BTS, so she shares information with Anna from time to time. Transcend boundaries, the pair gets along very well.

      Tracy and Anna are physically challenged, whereas Marish is ethnic minority. They all think it is good to have a favourite singer. As long as they do not over indulge, having an idol can add joy to everyday life and give them strength.

      In this episode, our host Angel will talk to the girls about this kind of energy.

      03/06/2024
    • We, multiracial

      We, multiracial

      Kim Jeeyun is a South Korean who studied photography in New York. She later married her husband from Hunan and settled in Hong Kong. She has been living in the city for sixteen years now and has three sons. Being part of a multicultural milieu herself, she has been capturing the beautiful bond between mothers and sons in this inclusive environment through her camera lens. She even organised photography exhibitions centred around this theme.

      She has captured the story of a mother of mixed Bulgarian and Chinese lineage with her "blonde daughter", and an Indonesian mother with her "brown son". Behind each family bond is a unique story of integration. How do Jeeyun, her family, and the subjects in the photos perceive themselves in such diverse families?

      As a South Korean, how does she communicate with her Chinese spouse? How does Wilfred, her 15-year-old "mixed-race" son growing up in Hong Kong, perceive his life here?

      In this episode, our host Omme Kulsoom, along with Wilfred and his classmate Riccardo, will have a chill chat about all of this.

      27/05/2024
    • Blind sir

      Blind sir

      Allen Ho, in his 40s, was an English teacher at a Band 1 secondary school. Four years ago, an unexplained fever left him unconscious in hospital for three months. During that time, he suffered a stroke and his heart stopped for nine minutes. He woke up from his coma only to find he has lost his vision and developed speech impediments. With an optimistic outlook, support of his family and motivation from his faith, he tried to make light of his ordeal in hospital and got back on his feet. He was determined to contribute to society.

      Allen went back to teaching. He now visits primary school to help students understand the world of visually impaired people. He also views exhibitions at art galleries with the students.

      In this episode, our host Karan Cholia will attend Allen's class with other students. He will also chat with Allen and Chloe, another visually impaired instructor.

      20/05/2024
    • Naveed the footballer

      Naveed the footballer

      Becoming a professional footballer in Hong Kong is no easy task already. For ethnic minorities, it is even more of a far-fetched dream. Meet Naveed, who was born in Pakistan and settled in Hong Kong at the age of five. Football was never a part of his early life, until he started joining the games in parks in Kwun Tong, and later joined the youth team of a local club "Eastern Long Lions". Slowly but surely, he discovered his passion. Along his journey, he grappled with questions like, "What can someone like me really achieve?"

      Despite bearing expectations from his family and encountering language barriers, he persevered and steadily climbed the ladder to becoming a pro player. Naveed's goal is to one day play for the representative team of Hong Kong. What does football mean to him? What challenges do ethnic minorities encounter in their journey to becoming professional players?

      And how do Naveed's teammates see him as an ethnic minority player? Join host Karan Cholia as they hit the pitch together.

      13/05/2024
    • All about My Mama

      All about My Mama

      For the past three decades, one thing has remained on top of Tam Sze-wai's priority list: focus on looking after her son, Kenny So, who has cerebral palsy. Today, her son is all grown up. He did well in school, graduated from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and now works as a full-time social worker and part-time lyricist. Mrs So has devoted phenomenal amounts of time and effort to help her son blend into society. She believes that the least a mother should do is teach her children to distinguish between right and wrong, bring them up in a decent environment and with good morals, and tell them not to constantly worry about being taken advantage of. A mother should talk to her children about anything and everything, and they will be willing to pour their hearts out to her.

      Michelle Leung’s son, Tony, has mild intellectual disability. Since he was young, Tony has shown an interest in music and drumming. In order to help her son develop his potentials, Michelle often accompanies him to drumming practice. When Tony plays the drums, she sings. Meanwhile, Michelle spends a lot of time reading with Tony to help him improve his expression skills. From a young age, Tony has enjoyed chatting about topics in newspapers and books with his mum. He is now the drummer of a band. Michelle hopes children like his son can grow up in a more inclusive society, where they have more recognition and opportunities.

      Two mothers, who call themselves ordinary, have raised two extraordinary sons.
      Mother's Day is approaching, they are here to tell us “All about My Mama”.

      06/05/2024
    • Wheel-man and the Sea

      Wheel-man and the Sea

      Toby Yip loves the sea. When he as 17 years old and working as a beach lifeguard, a diving accident left him wheelchair bound. He went to university, became a social worker, got married, had a daughter. He even rekindled his passion for the sea, learning scuba diving with veteran coach Stephen Au and returning to the sea. Over the past 13 years, Au has taught over 1,000 students with disabilities. For them, scuba diving is not only as a hobby but also therapy: true inclusion is possible in the state of weightlessness underwater.

      Yip subsequently joined an organisation for divers with disabilities as chairman, helping more people like him return to the sea. Life in a wheelchair can also be fulfilling. Over the years, Toby Yip's wife has stayed by his side, on land and in the water. In this episode, presenter Sham Hang-fu will chat with Yip.

      29/04/2024
    • The Taste of Mom’s cooking

      The Taste of Mom’s cooking

      Vlorla was born in family. Her grandparents moved to Hong Kong in the 1970s and opened small Indonesian restaurants in Hung Hom and Tsuen Wan one after another. Running the restaurant, Vlorla’s mother took her to the restaurant when she was small. That's why she likes to say she grew up in the kitchen.

      Influenced by her family, Vlorla developed an interest in cooking and studied culinary in culinary school. In the beginning, she just shared her delicacies with friends, only to become a door-to-door chef. In addition to Indonesian cuisines, she also makes use of the characteristics of other Southeast Asian cuisines and creates her own menu.

      In this episode, our presenter Omme talked with Vlorla about her favourite Southeast Asian dishes and Lin Chan, second-generation Thai, joined as well. They also cooked together and prepare a new year feast.

      01/11/2023
    • Ramadan Challenge

      Ramadan Challenge

      People may know that Muslims practice Ramadan every year. But how much do they really know about Ramadan? What are the practices and meanings?

      Presenters of the programme, Karan Cholia and Angel Leung, are not Muslims. Regeneration Warrior Ray Shum (Daddy Fu), father of two young girls, is not Muslim as well. Yet in this episode, they are to practice Ramadan – for one day! How do they feel and think?

      Rizwan Ullah, locally born and bred Muslim, will talk about Ramadan culture with Karan. Karan will also visit a Mosque with Daddy Fu to know more about Ramadan.

      25/10/2023