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08/07/2020
Cultural Heritage2019 - My Land (English Version)
Cultural Heritage2019 - My Land (English Version)
Located in Shaanxi Province, Mount Huashan was already mentioned in the “Classic of Mountains and Seas”. Qing dynasty scholar Zhang Taiyan even believes that it is one of the cradles of Chinese civilisation. In 1949, towards the end of the Chinese Civil War, the People’s Liberation Army used bamboo poles and ropes to climb the precipitous cliffs of Mount Huashan in order to reach its North Peak. This trail was later paved and named “The Intelligent Take-over Route of Mount Huashan”. Shuangquan Village, which lies in the vicinity of the mountain, is the birthplace of Huayin Old Tune, a type of music dubbed “China’s most ancient style of rock and roll”. Research has deduced that it evolved from the calls that Western Han dynasty boatmen used to made. Although it has been included in the Representative List of China’s National Intangible Cultural Heritage, this ancient art form is sadly facing the cruel fate of being lost due to a lack of inheritors. Early humans excavated caves to use them as dwellings. Yangjiagou to the north of Yan’an is home to the Ma Family Manor, a cave home complex. Arranged in a configuration described as “Five Exposed, Four Concealed, Six Compartmental”, the courtyard cave dwellings served as the residences of prestigious families in the Qing dynasty. During the Chinese Civil War, the People’s Liberation Army was also stationed here under Mao Zedong’s leadership. The inhabitants of the Loess Plateau have subsisted on millet for millennia. It was even an imperial tribute in the Ming and Qing dynasties. This drought-resistant grain is the only crop that can be grown in the dry climate of Mizhi County. Generations of farmers have been persevering silently, all in the hope that their offspring can have a way out. Meanwhile, peculiar landscapes are on display below the plateau. A Danxia landform area the size of Kowloon Peninsula featuring wavy red sandstone terrain can be found in Jingbian County. A festive dance is performed amidst this masterpiece of nature – Jingbian Donkey Running. How does its inheritor Zhang Youwan attract the younger generation to learn this craft? Producer: Tsang Chor-sun
02/07/2020
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
“Getting sold down the river” and “Old Man from San Fran” were used to describe the Cantonese people who travelled overseas to be mine and railroad workers during the late Qing dynasty and early Republic of China period. Taishan’s coastal location and deep-water port makes it a natural gateway to faraway lands, leading successive generations of Taishanese to seek livelihoods away from their ancestral home. Taishan is China’s first overseas Chinese hometown. There are over 1.3 million overseas Chinese of Taishanese descent around the world, a number which exceeds the local population. There is actually a Taishanese village in Hong Kong – San Wai Fuk Hing Lane Village in Yuen Long, which was established more than a century ago. Thomas Yeung grew up there and saw the changes that the village has undergone first-hand. Although the blue brick house that he lived in as a child is now a Western-style villa, he has managed to preserve his clan’s genealogy book which has over 100 years of history. William Chan is Thomas Yeung’s primary school classmate and friend. His grandfather opened the only grocery store in the village – Overseas Chinese Store has borne witness to the changes within the village. Initially solely patronised by villagers, it became the canteen for construction workers when the highway was being built. Nowadays, however, it is much more convenient to go into town, leaving the store deserted. It has also been relocated from the market plaza to an inconspicuous spot next to the Chan family’s ancestral residence. William Chan has persisted with running the store to fulfil his promise to his late father of “continuing to provide a place for neighbourhood residents to get together”. Like many other Taishanese, William Chan and Thomas Yeung have both worked abroad. The former went to Africa when he was 45 to manage a car factory for 17 years, climbing the corporate ladder at the cost of missing his sons’ childhoods. Meanwhile, the latter worked in Europe for a few years before returning to Hong Kong as he was unable to adapt to the local life. They both say that the Taishanese of today do not necessarily have to work abroad, because there are many opportunities for development in Hong Kong and the mainland, offering them a plethora of options. Regardless of this, the Taishanese people’s sentimental ties to their hometown remains unchanged. The number of fortified towers which stand in the city are a testament to this. The overseas Chinese remitted money back to their ancestral home, contributing to its prosperity. Subsequently, the residents built fortified towers to protect their home from thieves. The two men are now leading semi-retired lives and go back to their ancestral home when they are free to drive their cares away. Returning to one’s place of origin is not just a habit of the elderly. Thirty-something Kenny used to go to his mother’s hometown (Zhongshan) with her to visit relatives as a child, and always thought that this was his ancestral home. It was not until he was in his 20s that he learnt that his roots originate in Taishan. His wife and mother-in-law (both of Shundenese descent), as well as his mother, all have their own ancestral residences, but why does he not? Consequently, he joined Hong Kong Federation of Tai Shan Association in hopes of finding his ancestral home. His family has lived in Hong Kong since his grandfather’s generation, with both Kenny and his father being born here. As his father lost interest in searching for his roots long ago, Kenny is tackling the task on his own. In a cruel twist of fate, he discovers that his grandfather had been using a fake name, making his already difficult search an even greater challenge. Will he be able to find his roots in the end? Everyone has an ancestral home. Whether it has withstood the ages or vanished without a trace, the search for it serves as a cure for homesickness.
16/08/2019
Heritage Connect
Heritage Connect
Nowadays, Tai O is a popular tourist spot. The stilt houses along the two sides of its unique waterways, and surrounded by mountains from its three sides – Tai O itself is a gorgeous landscape painting. The number of usual residents currently living in this small community is less than 3000. It was, however, once a market town which was home to more than 20000 people. The distinctive ecology and geographical location of Tai O fostered the development of the fishery, salt, agricultural and commercial industries in the early years, which had attracted people from different clans to settle down in the place. Over the years, Tai O has developed its own social and cultural traditions, which have linked together the residents of Tai O. The Tai O Dragon Boat Water Parade is a traditional religious activity, which has been passed on up until today, and helps unite the local community. The over-a-century old ritual is co-organised by three fishermen's associations. Yet, following the decline of the fishery industry with the moving out of the residents, it has become increasingly challenging to promote this activity. Fortunately, the Tai O people have never abandoned this tradition. Whether it is the older generation who has moved to other places, or the younger generation whose hearts are with Tai O, they will always come back for this grand occasion. Meanwhile, the Tai O Dragon Boat Water Parade was inscribed onto the national list of intangible cultural heritage in 2011, and this local tradition has obtained more subsidies and attention as a result. Producer: Michelle Tang Assistant Producer: Stephanie Wong
08/07/2020
Cultural Heritage2019 - My Land (English Version)
Cultural Heritage2019 - My Land (English Version)
Located in Shaanxi Province, Mount Huashan was already mentioned in the “Classic of Mountains and Seas”. Qing dynasty scholar Zhang Taiyan even believes that it is one of the cradles of Chinese civilisation. In 1949, towards the end of the Chinese Civil War, the People’s Liberation Army used bamboo poles and ropes to climb the precipitous cliffs of Mount Huashan in order to reach its North Peak. This trail was later paved and named “The Intelligent Take-over Route of Mount Huashan”. Shuangquan Village, which lies in the vicinity of the mountain, is the birthplace of Huayin Old Tune, a type of music dubbed “China’s most ancient style of rock and roll”. Research has deduced that it evolved from the calls that Western Han dynasty boatmen used to made. Although it has been included in the Representative List of China’s National Intangible Cultural Heritage, this ancient art form is sadly facing the cruel fate of being lost due to a lack of inheritors. Early humans excavated caves to use them as dwellings. Yangjiagou to the north of Yan’an is home to the Ma Family Manor, a cave home complex. Arranged in a configuration described as “Five Exposed, Four Concealed, Six Compartmental”, the courtyard cave dwellings served as the residences of prestigious families in the Qing dynasty. During the Chinese Civil War, the People’s Liberation Army was also stationed here under Mao Zedong’s leadership. The inhabitants of the Loess Plateau have subsisted on millet for millennia. It was even an imperial tribute in the Ming and Qing dynasties. This drought-resistant grain is the only crop that can be grown in the dry climate of Mizhi County. Generations of farmers have been persevering silently, all in the hope that their offspring can have a way out. Meanwhile, peculiar landscapes are on display below the plateau. A Danxia landform area the size of Kowloon Peninsula featuring wavy red sandstone terrain can be found in Jingbian County. A festive dance is performed amidst this masterpiece of nature – Jingbian Donkey Running. How does its inheritor Zhang Youwan attract the younger generation to learn this craft? Producer: Tsang Chor-sun
02/07/2020
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
“Getting sold down the river” and “Old Man from San Fran” were used to describe the Cantonese people who travelled overseas to be mine and railroad workers during the late Qing dynasty and early Republic of China period. Taishan’s coastal location and deep-water port makes it a natural gateway to faraway lands, leading successive generations of Taishanese to seek livelihoods away from their ancestral home. Taishan is China’s first overseas Chinese hometown. There are over 1.3 million overseas Chinese of Taishanese descent around the world, a number which exceeds the local population. There is actually a Taishanese village in Hong Kong – San Wai Fuk Hing Lane Village in Yuen Long, which was established more than a century ago. Thomas Yeung grew up there and saw the changes that the village has undergone first-hand. Although the blue brick house that he lived in as a child is now a Western-style villa, he has managed to preserve his clan’s genealogy book which has over 100 years of history. William Chan is Thomas Yeung’s primary school classmate and friend. His grandfather opened the only grocery store in the village – Overseas Chinese Store has borne witness to the changes within the village. Initially solely patronised by villagers, it became the canteen for construction workers when the highway was being built. Nowadays, however, it is much more convenient to go into town, leaving the store deserted. It has also been relocated from the market plaza to an inconspicuous spot next to the Chan family’s ancestral residence. William Chan has persisted with running the store to fulfil his promise to his late father of “continuing to provide a place for neighbourhood residents to get together”. Like many other Taishanese, William Chan and Thomas Yeung have both worked abroad. The former went to Africa when he was 45 to manage a car factory for 17 years, climbing the corporate ladder at the cost of missing his sons’ childhoods. Meanwhile, the latter worked in Europe for a few years before returning to Hong Kong as he was unable to adapt to the local life. They both say that the Taishanese of today do not necessarily have to work abroad, because there are many opportunities for development in Hong Kong and the mainland, offering them a plethora of options. Regardless of this, the Taishanese people’s sentimental ties to their hometown remains unchanged. The number of fortified towers which stand in the city are a testament to this. The overseas Chinese remitted money back to their ancestral home, contributing to its prosperity. Subsequently, the residents built fortified towers to protect their home from thieves. The two men are now leading semi-retired lives and go back to their ancestral home when they are free to drive their cares away. Returning to one’s place of origin is not just a habit of the elderly. Thirty-something Kenny used to go to his mother’s hometown (Zhongshan) with her to visit relatives as a child, and always thought that this was his ancestral home. It was not until he was in his 20s that he learnt that his roots originate in Taishan. His wife and mother-in-law (both of Shundenese descent), as well as his mother, all have their own ancestral residences, but why does he not? Consequently, he joined Hong Kong Federation of Tai Shan Association in hopes of finding his ancestral home. His family has lived in Hong Kong since his grandfather’s generation, with both Kenny and his father being born here. As his father lost interest in searching for his roots long ago, Kenny is tackling the task on his own. In a cruel twist of fate, he discovers that his grandfather had been using a fake name, making his already difficult search an even greater challenge. Will he be able to find his roots in the end? Everyone has an ancestral home. Whether it has withstood the ages or vanished without a trace, the search for it serves as a cure for homesickness.
24/06/2020
The Works
The Works
After spending most of the term learning from home, Hong Kong’s secondary school students began returning to classes at the end of last month. Primary school children returned to school at the beginning of this month. Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, many students have had to learn online. But some subjects can be understood better by collaborating with other parties, or participating in community projects in different neighbourhoods. Parasite Art Space’s exhibition “Garden of Six Seasons” was set to open two months ago, but, like many other events, was delayed by the pandemic. A precursor to the Kathmandu Triennale in December, the show opened last month and spanned two venues, one in Sheung Wan and one in Quarry Bay, showcasing works by 40 international artists. The title of the exhibition comes from a real garden in Kathmandu known as the, “Garden of Dreams”. Created 100 years ago as an Edwardian Neo-Classical Garden, it has gone through changes with the rest of its surroundings. Not only have the original six pavilions been reduced to three, the Kathmandu Valley’s former six seasons have been transformed by climate change to just four. When pianist Joyce Cheung last came to our studio three months ago, she talked about an upcoming crowdfunded music project, Ginger Muse that she and fellow musicians were putting together. Focusing on musicians from different disciplines, it aimed to present innovative and experimental music programmes. Now the project is under way, and the founders are here to tell us more. One of Hong Kong's most iconic contemporary artists Gaylord Chan passed away at St. Teresa's Hospital on 22nd June at the age of 95.
17/08/2019
Hall of Wisdom
Hall of Wisdom
As the old saying goes, “People rarely live to be 70”. So how does Josephine SIAO, now aged 71, struggle for learning? She started her acting career as a child star at the age of six. In the 1960’s, she became sworn sisters with six other actresses of Cantonese films, including Connie CHAN and Nancy SIT, who were affectionately known as “The Seven Princesses”. At the prime of her career, Josephine chose to take a break from the film industry to study in the United States. After graduation, she gave up her previously established image and played vividly the well-liked yet grotesque character “Plain Jane”. In 1995, her exceptional performance in “Summer Snow” even earned her the city’s Golden Bauhinia Award, Hong Kong Film Critics Society Award, Silver Bear at Berlin International Film Festival, as well as Taipei’s Golden Horse Award, rendering her a grand slam winner. Utilising her clout, she established the End Child Sexual Abuse Foundation with a view to advocating protection of children from sexual abuse. Despite suffering from severe hearing problems in recent years, she remains passionate about life, dedicating herself to everyday self-learning and self-improvement. Let us have a glimpse of Josephine’s legendary past and explore what she has symbolised during different times in Hong Kong. We will also learn from her how we can live a fruitful life and achieve “lifelong learning”! Host: LAW Wing-chung Guest Host: Edward LAM

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