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11/06/2021
The Pulse
The Pulse
Despite the fact that in Hong Kong Covid-19 vaccinations are easily accessible and free, the vaccination programme, launched more than three months ago, has resulted in only about 24% of the total population receiving a first dose, with just 17% being fully vaccinated. To boost take-up, the government and the private sector are offering incentives such as lottery tickets, luxury flats, gold, cash, shopping vouchers, and cheaper holidays and flights. Incentives notwithstanding a recent survey by the Faculty of Medicine at the Chinese University shows there’s still considerable vaccine hesitance. Only one in four of those not yet vaccinated are planning to be jabbed in the coming six months. Some are concerned about possible side effects. Others say they have little confidence in government recommendations or the manufacturers of the vaccines. And then there are those who are waiting for a better vaccine to come along. We spoke to Ivan Hung, a co-convenor of the government’s Expert Committee on Clinical Events Assessment, to address some of these concerns. Other than the millions of dollars’ worth of cash and prizes in Covid-19 vaccine incentives offered by the private sector, the government has also been hoping to reduce vaccine hesitancy by relaxing restrictions for the fully vaccinated through introducing “vaccine bubbles” in restaurants, catering business and the tourism sector. Despite some recent exemptions and a little loosening up, Hong Kong has one of the strictest virus quarantine measures. A mandatory 14 to 21-day quarantine is required for people who have travelled outside and returned to Hong Kong, although this is now being reviewed. The tourism industry is struggling and has come up with all manner of new initiatives but they will yield no more than a fraction of earnings in more normal times.
04/06/2021
The Pulse
The Pulse
Liberal Studies was introduced in Hong Kong in 2009 as one of four senior secondary core subjects. The first liberal studies examinations were held in 2012. When introducing the subject, the government said its goals were to equip future generations “with a broad base of knowledge, high adaptability, independent thinking skills and an ability to engage in life-long learning” to face future challenges. But Liberal Studies came under scrutiny and criticism during the social unrest in 2019. In September of that year, the government said, “in view of the escalating social incidents”, it was introducing a one-off professional consultancy service to the publishers of Liberal Studies textbooks to ensure the quality of their content. In May last year, Chief Executive Carrie Lam warned that students should not be “poisoned” with “false and biased” information, and subjects such as Liberal Studies could be “infiltrated”. She urged the Education Bureau to act as gatekeepers and handle this matter. So, in the coming school year, Liberal Studies has a new name and a new focus. To talk about the revamp of Liberal Studies and the new curriculum with us are Lau Chi-pang of the Curriculum Development Council of the Hong Kong Examinations and Assessment Authorities, and Tin Fong-chak of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers Union and currently a Liberal Studies teacher. For the second year in a row, the police have banned the June 4th candlelight vigil in Victoria Park citing Covid-19 restrictions. Following the introduction of the National Security Law the Security Bureau has warned that people who take part in unauthorised assemblies, advertise, or publicise them may face terms of imprisonment ranging from one to five years. The police have said they are putting 3,000 anti-riot officers on standby and will conduct checks in areas where commemorations might be held – at least a thousand may be deployed around Victoria Park - and will act swiftly against any unauthorised June 4 gatherings. Something to bear in mind.
03/06/2021
Artspiration (English Version)
Artspiration (English Version)
Bereavement - Kwong-san Tang (Artist) Layer upon layer of weight is scraped onto a faint projected image. The large-scale drawings exude tranquillity and absolute stillness. Under the graphite are stories about loved ones and self-displacement. Photography and drawing are combined to create mixed media works, transforming relics into historical documents. It is like standing in front of a monument, or reminiscing the deceased and contemplating one’s identity before an altar. And so, the process of bereavement is completed. Producer: Ka-ho Tse Accumulation - Andy Lee (Artist) “To dance, one must first have a body. The body is the foundation. It is also the foundation of each and every individual. The body can be likened to tree rings,” Andy Lee says. The dance workshop led by him adopts a “danceless” approach. It foregoes choreographed dance steps and puts the focus back on movement games, enabling participants to explore the possibilities of the body and to connect with their innermost selves. At the same time, it also raises the following questions: Has art been reduced to a form of “community service”? Is it becoming increasingly superficial and mediocre due to entertainment and recreational demand? Or has art become nothing more than a showy or charitable means of consumption? What has been preserved is art’s ability to facilitate introspection and reacquaintance with our true selves. Let performance build dialogue, so that the presence of art will continue to remain solid. Producer: Bacon Cheng
11/06/2021
The Pulse
The Pulse
Despite the fact that in Hong Kong Covid-19 vaccinations are easily accessible and free, the vaccination programme, launched more than three months ago, has resulted in only about 24% of the total population receiving a first dose, with just 17% being fully vaccinated. To boost take-up, the government and the private sector are offering incentives such as lottery tickets, luxury flats, gold, cash, shopping vouchers, and cheaper holidays and flights. Incentives notwithstanding a recent survey by the Faculty of Medicine at the Chinese University shows there’s still considerable vaccine hesitance. Only one in four of those not yet vaccinated are planning to be jabbed in the coming six months. Some are concerned about possible side effects. Others say they have little confidence in government recommendations or the manufacturers of the vaccines. And then there are those who are waiting for a better vaccine to come along. We spoke to Ivan Hung, a co-convenor of the government’s Expert Committee on Clinical Events Assessment, to address some of these concerns. Other than the millions of dollars’ worth of cash and prizes in Covid-19 vaccine incentives offered by the private sector, the government has also been hoping to reduce vaccine hesitancy by relaxing restrictions for the fully vaccinated through introducing “vaccine bubbles” in restaurants, catering business and the tourism sector. Despite some recent exemptions and a little loosening up, Hong Kong has one of the strictest virus quarantine measures. A mandatory 14 to 21-day quarantine is required for people who have travelled outside and returned to Hong Kong, although this is now being reviewed. The tourism industry is struggling and has come up with all manner of new initiatives but they will yield no more than a fraction of earnings in more normal times.
16/03/2021
Shall We Talk
Shall We Talk
Episode 8 “Latter Life Leisures” Host: Vivian KONG Dave hurt his wrist when he was 50 years old. He was waiting in the hospital for a follow-up consultation when the public address system made the announcement: “LAU Wing-ming who is 50 years old, please go to Room 9.” “Maybe someone has the same name as mine, so the age is revealed for identification. At that moment, it was like God announced to me: You’ve entered your fifties!” Raymond and Alissa also share similar experience of “growing old”. The three seniors and Vivian KONG all laugh heartily. Age gap does not obstruct them from communication and opening their hearts to one another. Dave is 75 years old, Raymond and Alissa are over 60 years old. All three of them are not young anymore, but Vivian is deeply impressed by their active and optimistic characters. The three elderly persons are part-time models, and they love doing exercise and learning new things. These are the secrets for maintaining good physical and mental health in old age. Sometimes, the tricks are just common sense like “mom is a woman”. However, it is always easier said than done. “We need to have targets in every stage of our life.” This is an effective prescription to prevent depression in the elderly and mood disorder. When we reach older age in life, we may be retired, and our children may become grown-ups. We no longer need to put ourselves under the spotlight of workplace and family, so it is time for us to explore a new world for ourselves. Dave, Raymond and Alissa are role models of seniors who are still energetic and charming. Our life is long, and our clothes are thin. Nothing in the world is more intimate to us than our own bodies. In fact, our body is a container which saves our emotions and memories. For the elderly, the most familiar signal from their bodies may be pain. The three seniors follow the teacher to explore their bodies and feel the pain points, because they understand that it is better to listen to their bodies and take good care of themselves instead of escaping from the problems. Although Vivian is younger than the seniors, she has deep feelings about her physical condition. As athletes are more sensitive to the changes in their bodies than the general public, will their have special feelings on “aging”? There may be a fear behind injuries that they dare not to touch. The teacher says, “It is time to learn how to slide down elegantly … ” The elderly learns about balance and fall prevention, while youngsters should also learn to overcome failure. Let us be optimistic, open-minded, curious and active to cosily walk through the final stage of the journey of our life.
02/07/2020
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
Hong Kong Stories - My Hometown (English Version)
“Getting sold down the river” and “Old Man from San Fran” were used to describe the Cantonese people who travelled overseas to be mine and railroad workers during the late Qing dynasty and early Republic of China period. Taishan’s coastal location and deep-water port makes it a natural gateway to faraway lands, leading successive generations of Taishanese to seek livelihoods away from their ancestral home. Taishan is China’s first overseas Chinese hometown. There are over 1.3 million overseas Chinese of Taishanese descent around the world, a number which exceeds the local population. There is actually a Taishanese village in Hong Kong – San Wai Fuk Hing Lane Village in Yuen Long, which was established more than a century ago. Thomas Yeung grew up there and saw the changes that the village has undergone first-hand. Although the blue brick house that he lived in as a child is now a Western-style villa, he has managed to preserve his clan’s genealogy book which has over 100 years of history. William Chan is Thomas Yeung’s primary school classmate and friend. His grandfather opened the only grocery store in the village – Overseas Chinese Store has borne witness to the changes within the village. Initially solely patronised by villagers, it became the canteen for construction workers when the highway was being built. Nowadays, however, it is much more convenient to go into town, leaving the store deserted. It has also been relocated from the market plaza to an inconspicuous spot next to the Chan family’s ancestral residence. William Chan has persisted with running the store to fulfil his promise to his late father of “continuing to provide a place for neighbourhood residents to get together”. Like many other Taishanese, William Chan and Thomas Yeung have both worked abroad. The former went to Africa when he was 45 to manage a car factory for 17 years, climbing the corporate ladder at the cost of missing his sons’ childhoods. Meanwhile, the latter worked in Europe for a few years before returning to Hong Kong as he was unable to adapt to the local life. They both say that the Taishanese of today do not necessarily have to work abroad, because there are many opportunities for development in Hong Kong and the mainland, offering them a plethora of options. Regardless of this, the Taishanese people’s sentimental ties to their hometown remains unchanged. The number of fortified towers which stand in the city are a testament to this. The overseas Chinese remitted money back to their ancestral home, contributing to its prosperity. Subsequently, the residents built fortified towers to protect their home from thieves. The two men are now leading semi-retired lives and go back to their ancestral home when they are free to drive their cares away. Returning to one’s place of origin is not just a habit of the elderly. Thirty-something Kenny used to go to his mother’s hometown (Zhongshan) with her to visit relatives as a child, and always thought that this was his ancestral home. It was not until he was in his 20s that he learnt that his roots originate in Taishan. His wife and mother-in-law (both of Shundenese descent), as well as his mother, all have their own ancestral residences, but why does he not? Consequently, he joined Hong Kong Federation of Tai Shan Association in hopes of finding his ancestral home. His family has lived in Hong Kong since his grandfather’s generation, with both Kenny and his father being born here. As his father lost interest in searching for his roots long ago, Kenny is tackling the task on his own. In a cruel twist of fate, he discovers that his grandfather had been using a fake name, making his already difficult search an even greater challenge. Will he be able to find his roots in the end? Everyone has an ancestral home. Whether it has withstood the ages or vanished without a trace, the search for it serves as a cure for homesickness.

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13/06/2021
Student Concert Hall 學界音樂廳
Student Concert Hall 學界音樂廳
Chiu Chun-him (accordian) 招俊謙(手風琴) Karol Namysłowski: Clarinet Polka 南斯羅夫斯基:單簧管波爾卡 Current grade 現時就讀級別 Primary 6 小六 I wish to thank 在音樂路上要感謝的人 My late accordion teacher Dr. Gordon Chau. 已故手風琴啟蒙老師周培賢博士。   Li Shun-hin Ernest (p) 李淳軒( 鋼琴) Chopin: Etude Op. 10, No. 4 蕭邦:練習曲,作品10,第四首 Current grade 現時就讀級別 Form 2 中二 An unforgettable musical experience 一個難忘的音樂經驗 Participating in a master class in the US and performed at Carnegie Hall. 到美國參加大師班和在卡內基音樂廳演出。                              Ms Gojo’s Class Violin Ensemble 五條秀美老師小提琴合奏團 Pachelbel: Canon in D Tchaikovsky (Hidemi Gojo, arr.): Dance of Sugar Plum Fairy from ‘The Nutcracker’ Johann Strauss, Jr. (Hidemi Gojo, arr.): The Blue Danube Richard Rodgers (Hidemi Gojo, arr.): The Lonely Goatherd from ‘The Sound of Music’ 巴凱貝爾(五條秀美編):D大調卡農曲 柴可夫斯基(五條秀美編):「糖梅仙子之舞」,選自《胡桃夾子》 小約翰‧史特勞斯(五條秀美編):藍色多瑙河 羅渣士(五條秀美編):「孤獨的牧羊人」,選自《仙樂飄飄處處聞》  Name of players 成員 Calvin Leung, Michael Chung, Erin Koo, So Wing-tat Josiah, Agnes Wu, Marie Lee, Yu Ying-kao, Yannes Lam, Rachel Chung, So Wing-yau Josetta, Benjamin Sze, Kaitlyn Cheung 梁宇超、鍾堯傑、顧希彤、蘇穎達、胡恩熙、李思彤、高如瑩、林卓、鍾熙桐、蘇穎悠、史家碩、張天豫 I wish to thank 在音樂路上要感謝的人 Our teacher Ms. Hidemi Gojo. 我們的老師五條秀美。   Cheung Tin-yue Kaitlyn (v) Hidemi Gojo (p) 張天豫(小提琴) 五條秀美(鋼琴) Friedrich Seitz: Concerto in G minor Op. 12, 1st mvt Jean-Baptiste Accolay: Concerto in A minor 薛茨:G小調協奏曲,作品12,第一樂章 阿考雷:A小調協奏曲  Current grade 現時就讀級別 Year 9 九年級 An unforgettable musical experience 一個難忘的音樂經驗 Attending Prof. Pierre Amoyal’s violin master class in Salzburg Austria 2017 when I was 10. 在奧地利薩爾茨堡參加阿莫雅爾教授的小提琴大師班。    Abigail Arnold (voc) Dennis Tam (p) 安琇暐(聲樂) 譚浩文(鋼琴) Barber: A Green Lowland of Pianos, Op. 45 No. 2 Chausson: Serenade Schubert: An den Mond 巴伯:綠低地的鋼琴,作品45,第二首 蕭頌:小夜曲 舒伯特:致月亮 Current grade 現時就讀級別 Year 13 十三年級 My musical dream 我的音樂夢想 To perform in an opera at La Scala. 在史卡拉歌劇院登台演出歌劇。

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