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17/08/2019
Hall of Wisdom
Hall of Wisdom
As the old saying goes, “People rarely live to be 70”. So how does Josephine SIAO, now aged 71, struggle for learning? She started her acting career as a child star at the age of six. In the 1960’s, she became sworn sisters with six other actresses of Cantonese films, including Connie CHAN and Nancy SIT, who were affectionately known as “The Seven Princesses”. At the prime of her career, Josephine chose to take a break from the film industry to study in the United States. After graduation, she gave up her previously established image and played vividly the well-liked yet grotesque character “Plain Jane”. In 1995, her exceptional performance in “Summer Snow” even earned her the city’s Golden Bauhinia Award, Hong Kong Film Critics Society Award, Silver Bear at Berlin International Film Festival, as well as Taipei’s Golden Horse Award, rendering her a grand slam winner. Utilising her clout, she established the End Child Sexual Abuse Foundation with a view to advocating protection of children from sexual abuse. Despite suffering from severe hearing problems in recent years, she remains passionate about life, dedicating herself to everyday self-learning and self-improvement. Let us have a glimpse of Josephine’s legendary past and explore what she has symbolised during different times in Hong Kong. We will also learn from her how we can live a fruitful life and achieve “lifelong learning”! Host: LAW Wing-chung Guest Host: Edward LAM
15/08/2019
A Legal Journey 2019 (English Version)
A Legal Journey 2019 (English Version)
To the general public, what is the law? Is it social rules resulting from the combination of redundant words? Is it complex provisions that are irrelevant and distant to them? The Clinical Legal Education Course (CLE) is part of the undergraduate  programmes offered at the Faculty of Law of The University of Hong Kong (HKU).  Under the guidance of professors, student volunteers assist duty lawyers in providing legal service to members of the public who are seeking legal advice.  While gaining practising experience, students also learn how to listen to and respect the people in need.  As for members of the public in need, not only do they enjoy free legal advice, but are also provided with the support throughout an exhausting litigation process.  Since its launch in 2010, CLE has handled 1 545 cases up to 3 December 2018. Several months ago, Ben saw a recruitment advertisement on a job search website for the position of “Guesthouse Front Desk Trainee”.  Hired after a formal interview, he hoped that the job would enable him to support his livelihood as well as pursue his further study in Japanese. One day, Ben checked a customer in as usual.  Soon after the customer entered the room, three inspectors from the Office of Licensing Authority (OLA) rushed into the guesthouse, while the customer who went into the room also identified himself as an undercover agent of OLA.  They took a statement from Ben on the site, charging him of allegedly “managing” an unlicensed guesthouse.  However, the person-in-charge and manager of the guesthouse, who were in higher ranks than Ben, were not prosecuted. Managing an unlicensed guesthouse is a criminal offence that can lead to a fine and a criminal record upon conviction.  Ben sought multiple legal advice, all of which suggested that he should plead guilty and pay an affordable fine (HKD 10,000) to prevent long judicial proceedings and high legal costs.  Nevertheless, Ben understood that he would have a criminal record if he pleaded guilty easily.  Not to mention that he firmly believed in his innocence since he truly was not aware that the guesthouse was unlicensed when he started working there.  In addition, it was most infuriating that the recruitment advertisement by the concerned guesthouse was still posted on the job search website after the incident. With nowhere else to turn to, Ben sought help from the Faculty of Law of HKU and hence was assigned with the duty lawyers and student volunteers to take care of his case.  He was found guilty in the first instance and appealed, but the duty  lawyers and the student volunteers did not give up helping him.  Finally, he lodged an appeal to the Court of Final Appeal, which ruled in favour of him.  Not only did the ruling clear his name, but it also changed the court’s interpretation of “manage” in the relevant legislation. Through this case, students at the Faculty of Law of HKU hope that the community will reflect on the legislative intent of the relevant legislation.  Aspiring to seek justice for members of the public, law students certainly aim high.  Yet, litigation is very time-consuming that it inevitably affects people’s daily lives, even if they win the case in the end.  From the trial to having his conviction quashed upon appeal, Ben underwent judicial proceedings lasting for 2 years and 4 months.  The psychological burden borne by him was indeed unimaginable to outsiders.  So how do law students strike a balance between “seeking justice” and “people’s feelings”?  In addition, what other experience and sentiment, which are not found in books, would CLE offer?
08/08/2019
Hong Kong Stories-Reflecting Hong Kong
Hong Kong Stories-Reflecting Hong Kong
People of different generations and ages have their own pace of life: Some choose to charge ahead at all costs during their youth, while some opt to stop and enjoy the slow life when they are in their prime. Regardless of whether you decide to take it fast or slow, we can still choose the pace at which we want to live our lives in our twilight years. 82-year-old Grandpa Poon (Stephen POON Tak-mong) has been involved in volunteer work since he retired from his stable career in civil service more than 20 years ago. At first, he only thought of it as a way to pass the time. As the days went by, however, he realised that he also benefits greatly from it, leading him to truly understand the meaning of “giving is better than receiving”. For Grandpa Poon, these 20-odd years of volunteer service have filled both his schedule and his heart. Meanwhile, 88-year-old Granny Cheng (CHENG Ling-yu) has devoted her entire life to caring for her family. When she was young, she worked in the garment industry to bring in additional income to support her family. She then quit her job in the latter stage of her life to take care of her grandchildren, shouldering the responsibility of looking after her family all on her own. Having experienced the trials and tribulations of life and tasted the bitterness of reality, Granny Cheng’s constant mention of “money” reflects the values of a particular faction of Hong Kongers. This is a story about the daily lives of two individuals in their twilight years. It is also a portrayal of certain Hong Kongers. Assistant Producer: Yim Pui-ying Director: Pang Chi-man Executive Producer: Ng Wai-in
22/06/2019
The Pulse
The Pulse
As a former British prime minister Harold Wilson famously said - a week in politics is a long time, well, the past week in Hong Kong demonstrates how true that is. Few people believed that it would be possible to exceed the size of a one million strong demonstration, but last Sunday an estimated two million people took to the streets to protest against the government’s extradition legislation. There may be some dispute over the numbers but no one seriously doubts that this was Hong Kong’s largest ever protest. Carrie Lam, her administration, and the police emerged as being the focus for anger over the way this crisis has been handled. Mrs Lam’s attempts at apology have done very little to dampen the fires of criticism either from protesters or indeed from pro-government lawmakers who previously defended the legislation. Earlier this week, legislator Pierre Chan revealed that the police can access the Hospital Authority’s system to check details of injured protesters who were admitted into the public hospital system, without using any special logins. Also with us in the studio is Willy Lam, Adjunct Professor of the Centre for China Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong to talk about the China factor in the extradition bill controversy. That’s it for this week. We’ll end with a look at last Sunday’s historic march: where as many as one in four of the population were out on the streets, walking, chanting and even singing hymns in ways that only happen in Hong Kong.
15/08/2019
A Legal Journey 2019 (English Version)
A Legal Journey 2019 (English Version)
To the general public, what is the law? Is it social rules resulting from the combination of redundant words? Is it complex provisions that are irrelevant and distant to them? The Clinical Legal Education Course (CLE) is part of the undergraduate  programmes offered at the Faculty of Law of The University of Hong Kong (HKU).  Under the guidance of professors, student volunteers assist duty lawyers in providing legal service to members of the public who are seeking legal advice.  While gaining practising experience, students also learn how to listen to and respect the people in need.  As for members of the public in need, not only do they enjoy free legal advice, but are also provided with the support throughout an exhausting litigation process.  Since its launch in 2010, CLE has handled 1 545 cases up to 3 December 2018. Several months ago, Ben saw a recruitment advertisement on a job search website for the position of “Guesthouse Front Desk Trainee”.  Hired after a formal interview, he hoped that the job would enable him to support his livelihood as well as pursue his further study in Japanese. One day, Ben checked a customer in as usual.  Soon after the customer entered the room, three inspectors from the Office of Licensing Authority (OLA) rushed into the guesthouse, while the customer who went into the room also identified himself as an undercover agent of OLA.  They took a statement from Ben on the site, charging him of allegedly “managing” an unlicensed guesthouse.  However, the person-in-charge and manager of the guesthouse, who were in higher ranks than Ben, were not prosecuted. Managing an unlicensed guesthouse is a criminal offence that can lead to a fine and a criminal record upon conviction.  Ben sought multiple legal advice, all of which suggested that he should plead guilty and pay an affordable fine (HKD 10,000) to prevent long judicial proceedings and high legal costs.  Nevertheless, Ben understood that he would have a criminal record if he pleaded guilty easily.  Not to mention that he firmly believed in his innocence since he truly was not aware that the guesthouse was unlicensed when he started working there.  In addition, it was most infuriating that the recruitment advertisement by the concerned guesthouse was still posted on the job search website after the incident. With nowhere else to turn to, Ben sought help from the Faculty of Law of HKU and hence was assigned with the duty lawyers and student volunteers to take care of his case.  He was found guilty in the first instance and appealed, but the duty  lawyers and the student volunteers did not give up helping him.  Finally, he lodged an appeal to the Court of Final Appeal, which ruled in favour of him.  Not only did the ruling clear his name, but it also changed the court’s interpretation of “manage” in the relevant legislation. Through this case, students at the Faculty of Law of HKU hope that the community will reflect on the legislative intent of the relevant legislation.  Aspiring to seek justice for members of the public, law students certainly aim high.  Yet, litigation is very time-consuming that it inevitably affects people’s daily lives, even if they win the case in the end.  From the trial to having his conviction quashed upon appeal, Ben underwent judicial proceedings lasting for 2 years and 4 months.  The psychological burden borne by him was indeed unimaginable to outsiders.  So how do law students strike a balance between “seeking justice” and “people’s feelings”?  In addition, what other experience and sentiment, which are not found in books, would CLE offer?
10/07/2019
The Works
The Works
Over the past month, we’ve visited Venice a few times to take a look at Hong Kong’s contribution and at the work in several national pavilions at the 58th Venice Biennale. These official exhibitions take over the city until November, but they are not the only things going on over the next few months. Here are some of the other attractions we found while we were there. The late Raimund Girke was an artist from Germany whose monochrome paintings and works are inspired by the Chinese sage Laozi. The title of Girke’s third solo exhibition at the Axel Vervoordt Gallery, “The Silent Balance”, is taken from the Laozi phrase: “Countless words count less than the silent balance of yin and yang.” White is the central colour in Girke’s work, providing a motif, a guideline, and both foreground and background. Any other colours, often muted, have to strike a silent balance with the white. Choreographer Dimitris Papaioannou is at the centre of the Greek theatrical avant-garde. After studying fine arts under Dimitris Mytaras, he attracted attention as a visual artist, illustrator and comic book creator. He went on to stage performance, including directing the opening ceremony of the Athens 2004 Olympic Games, which gained him considerable international attention. After three decades of creating stage works, last year he produced a full-evening work for Tanztheatre Wuppertal Pina Bausch, the first choreographer to do so since Bausch’s death in 2009. Three weeks ago, he came to Hong Kong for the first time, with his earlier production, The Great Tamer. Well that’s it from us for this season. Time for The Works to take its annual summer break. But we’ll be back in the autumn. Until then, whether you simply enjoy the creative works of others, or create your own, have a great summer. See you soon.
13/07/2019
Hall of Wisdom
Hall of Wisdom
Two years ago, John TSANG resigned as the Financial Secretary (FS) and later announced his candidacy for the Chief Executive (CE) post. With an image of being relaxed and having a good sense of humour, he led the opinion polls all the way. However, the Election Committee chose Carrie LAM, our current CE, over him and he eventually lost the election. TSANG had been in charge of Hong Kong’s finance for 10 years. He had been the FS since 2007, and he is the longest-serving FS since the handover of Hong Kong’s sovereignty. He migrated to the US with his family at the age of 13, and he was a tearaway in his early years. He has learnt Chinese martial arts and fencing, played in bands, and even participated in the American civil rights movement. He has also worked as an architect. Subsequently, he went to Harvard University to study public administration. There he met former CE Donald TSANG, who encouraged him to return to Hong Kong to apply for the post of Administrative Officer. TSANG has worked for Chris Patten as the Private Secretary to the Governor, served in Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, London, and took up the post as the head of a disciplinary department (Commissioner of Customs and Excise), etc. His career in the Government provided a sharp contrast to the colourful experience at his young age. During his tenure as CS, TSANG was labelled a “layabout” and a “Scrooge”, yet he was one of the very few senior government officials in the SAR government to have high popularities. He says that he believes in free market, our system and the rule of law, but at the same time he describes himself as a person without a specific ideology. There seems to be some sort of a contradiction between the two. He demonstrates that he is an open-minded person, which is rare in the pro-establishment camp … which him is the real him? Through this talk, we will learn more about TSANG’s growing background and experiences, and how these have affect his values and life direction today. As of the future of Hong Kong, what views does TSANG have? Are they optimistic or pessimistic? Host: LAW Wing-chung
08/08/2019
Hong Kong Stories-Reflecting Hong Kong
Hong Kong Stories-Reflecting Hong Kong
People of different generations and ages have their own pace of life: Some choose to charge ahead at all costs during their youth, while some opt to stop and enjoy the slow life when they are in their prime. Regardless of whether you decide to take it fast or slow, we can still choose the pace at which we want to live our lives in our twilight years. 82-year-old Grandpa Poon (Stephen POON Tak-mong) has been involved in volunteer work since he retired from his stable career in civil service more than 20 years ago. At first, he only thought of it as a way to pass the time. As the days went by, however, he realised that he also benefits greatly from it, leading him to truly understand the meaning of “giving is better than receiving”. For Grandpa Poon, these 20-odd years of volunteer service have filled both his schedule and his heart. Meanwhile, 88-year-old Granny Cheng (CHENG Ling-yu) has devoted her entire life to caring for her family. When she was young, she worked in the garment industry to bring in additional income to support her family. She then quit her job in the latter stage of her life to take care of her grandchildren, shouldering the responsibility of looking after her family all on her own. Having experienced the trials and tribulations of life and tasted the bitterness of reality, Granny Cheng’s constant mention of “money” reflects the values of a particular faction of Hong Kongers. This is a story about the daily lives of two individuals in their twilight years. It is also a portrayal of certain Hong Kongers. Assistant Producer: Yim Pui-ying Director: Pang Chi-man Executive Producer: Ng Wai-in
28/04/2019
On Air On Broadcast Drive
On Air On Broadcast Drive
As night-time radio programmes compete head-to-head with television programmes, night-time has never been the prime time for radio. People generally do not expect much of the audience ratings of these programmes. Despite adverse circumstances, radio hosts Francis MAK and Ocean CHAN managed to produce widely popular night-time radio programmes, thanks to their never-give-up spirit and unique perspectives. The rebellious Ocean CHAN has longed for working as a DJ since childhood. Equipped with rich musical knowledge, she hosts the programme “Sky of Ocean”. In the phone-in session of the programme, she often remains insistent on her opinion and argues with the audience, and even hangs up on them. These unexpected moves have gradually shaped her as a well-loved “DJ with her own character”. After the financial crisis, Francis MAK felt that the community was fraught with negativity. Therefore, he produced the programme “Meeting Titanic on a Starry Night”, hoping to give the audience a positivity boost and encourage them to never give up, which made him their soul counsellor. He even established the “Never Give Up Association” and dedicated himself to youth counselling. His exemplary contribution earned him the Medal of Honour in 2005. In this episode, Ocean CHAN and Francis MAK will take a retrospective look at the days they worked on Broadcast Drive, and inspire the new generation of hosts to make their dreams come true. Host:Sandy LAMB Guest:Francis MAK, Ocean CHAN Producer:LAU Ying Keung

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19/08/2019
Youth in Harmony 音符出少年
Youth in Harmony 音符出少年
Mon 星期一 8pm From August to December, Radio 4 listeners will be able to listen to a new programme – Youth in Harmony. Many performing groups made up of children and youths will be in the spotlight. These recent concerts not only allow these youngsters, their friends and families to listen to their passionate music-making on air and on the web, but also reveal that Hong Kong is musically eventful. Youth concerts itself excel in both quality and quantity. 由8至12月,第四台聽眾可以在星期日晚上8時的新節目音符出少年中,聽到多場由年輕人組成的樂團及合唱團送上的音樂會。這一系列節目是最近在香港演出的現場錄音,除了讓年輕優秀樂手和合唱團員,以及他們的親朋好友在收音機或網上感受他們對音樂的熱誠外,更引證香港是個音樂盛事之都,單是由年青人演出的音樂會已十分頻繁而高水平。 The concerts include: 這些音樂會包恬: - 香港浸會大學管樂團 HKBU Wind Symphony - 第二屆香港演藝學院節呈獻:音樂學院-協奏曲盛宴 The Academy Concert: Concerto Feast - 香港浸會大學室樂合唱團 Cantoría Hong Kong - 香港兒童交響樂團 (伯恩斯坦曲目) Hong Kong Children's Symphony plays Bernstein - 香港Pro Arte 管弦樂團 Pro Arte Orchestra of Hong Kong - 2018一帶一路世界合唱節 ─ 俄羅斯春天兒童合唱團 2018 Belt & Road World Choir Festival: Ponomaryov Vesna Children's Choir Concert - 2018一帶一路世界合唱節 – 紐西蘭中學生合唱團及莫蘭合唱團會 2018 Belt & Road World Choir Festival: New Zealand Secondary Students’ Choir and Moran Singers Ensemble (Israel) Concert - 香港兒童合唱團2018海外演出預演音樂會 Hong Kong Children’s Choir pre-tour concert 2018 - 香兒邁向50周年 ─ 「友共情」音樂會系列:香兒與何崇志合唱作品專場 HKCC Towards 50th Anniversary - "HKCC & Friends" Concert Series: HKCC sings Steve Ho - a choral highlight concert

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