X

Hot Search

TV
31
RADIO
R1
RADIO
R2
RADIO
R3
RADIO
R4
RADIO
R5
RADIO

PUTONG

HUA

沒有相關節目重溫
No programme archive found

TV

LATEST
TOP HIT
LATEST
A-Z
25/11/2020
The Works
The Works
Last week, billionaire and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates said that he believes more than 50% of business travel and 30% of office life will disappear in the post-Covid-19 world. There is certainly no doubt that for now our work and travel activities remain severely restricted. Given this new normal, the European Union Office in Hong Kong and Macao and the German Consulate General Hong Kong recently joined forces to organise a music programme hoping to, at least temporarily, take audiences to places they can’t otherwise reach. The fallout from this year’s Covid-19 pandemic and last year’s social unrest has been particularly disruptive for students. Classes have been stopped intermittently, and not everyone has equal access to online learning. These interruptions have made life particularly hard for those who need physical access to facilities and equipment to complete their work, such as students of art or other creative subjects. And the students, particularly in places like the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, have also had the psychological effects of those factors to face. Adia Millett is an American multi-media artist who incorporates quilting, painting, stitching, woodwork and diorama creation. In her first exhibition in Hong Kong, “A Matter of Time” at Galerie du Monde, Millett uses colourful hues, lines, shapes, patterns and textures to encourage viewers to construct their own meaning during committed moments spent experiencing her work.
20/11/2020
The Pulse
The Pulse
As an African proverb goes, when elephants fight it is the grass that suffers. Currently, Hong Kong is finding itself in the position of that grass. Starting this month, locally-made goods can no longer be exported to the United States with the label “Made in Hong Kong”. More on that later. But first, tech giants such as Apple, Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft have dominated the world for decades. Today though, so-called “platform” companies and the “platform economy” are in the ascendant. One research report by McKinsey suggests more than 30% of global economic activity - some US$60 trillion - could be mediated by digital platforms within the next six years. And that concerns regulators everywhere, including in mainland China, where the government worries that digital platform companies such as Tencent, and Alibaba and its affiliated Ant Group, could be getting too big and too influential. As his presidential term started, Donald Trump was sometimes full of praises for Chinese President Xi Jinping. Later though, he changed tack, accusing China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft and initiating a trade war with China in 2018. The US has since imposed hefty tariffs on Chinese goods, and China has naturally retaliated. In January, both sides called a truce, but Hong Kong has been caught in the US-China crossfire. Since the introduction of the National Security Law in May, the United States has revoked Hong Kong’s special trade status and imposed sanctions on top local and mainland officials. And starting this month, the “Made in Hong Kong” label is no longer allowed on locally-made goods exported to the US.
18/11/2020
The Works
The Works
Cha chaan teng culture is a subject particularly close to the hearts of many Hongkongers. Freshly brewed coffee is certainly making inroads into Hong Kong, but there are still plenty of people who like to drink Hong Kong-style milk tea, also known as “silk-stocking milk tea”, with their breakfast or with egg tarts and other favourites in the afternoon. Of course, there is a long tradition of tea-drinking in China, but Hong Kong-style milk tea grew out of the British tradition of afternoon tea. It has gone through changes though. Here, black tea is usually taken with evaporated or condensed milk and a variety of very Cantonese snacks. At the Whitestone Gallery you can see a series of large-scale works by Korean artist Han Youngwook in the exhibition “Face”, his first solo exhibition in Hong Kong. The large portraits, sometimes alternative portraits of the same person in different moods, combine paint with scratches and other indents on aluminium, to reflect on aspects of the human condition. Han draws his inspiration from real life and from the internet, but once he has chosen a person’s image, he explores the person’s qualities, combining his own perception and creativity to reveal what he sees as the true character of the human figures and the human condition. Pianist Jamie Shum earned her music degree at Hong Kong Baptist University before going on to obtain a Master of Music degree in Piano Performance and Literature at Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. This Thursday at City Hall she’s giving a recital that spans the 19th and 20th centuries with music from Chopin, Liszt, Rachmaninov, and Prokofiev. She came to our studio to tell us more.
17/11/2020
Everyday Design 2
Everyday Design 2
Is it a must to use our brains when designing? Not necessarily. For designers, it is even more free and fun using their hands first, then their brains, and find out the answers directly during the production process. Young concrete art designer Stefan said, “Every time I really look forward to how the final products will look after demoulding. The anticipation brings me pleasure.” Stefan loves mixing different materials with his concrete art design. He describes that the process is like cooking as we need to use our hands to adjust the concrete art recipes into ones that suit our tastes. Paper engineer and designer Soilworm said, “When you make something by hand, you will have more room to reconsider during the process, which will induce even more possibilities.” Soilworm and his years-long partner Michael have all along insisted in handling every production step on their own. The more experiences accumulated, the further the techniques can break away from the limitations, which enables them to walk further. Toy designer Lego said, “The pleasure of hand making things is that you can create something that doesn’t exist in real life, or creatures which I think they will exist in the future.” Lego and her husband Lewa are both vinyl toy designers. They gain inspiration from the surrealist worlds in their hearts, and turn surreal creatures into art collectibles. Each work has its own original story and even contains the couple’s thoughts on real life. Architecture conservator FUNG Wai-keung said, “If new techniques can be suitably integrated with traditional crafts, the crafts will possibly become art.” FUNG is well versed in the craft of terrazzo. He hit it off with Stefan, and the latter turned the creative ideas which FUNG could not realise into handicrafts using new techniques, which has brought new opportunities to this endangered traditional craft. Maria, Programme Manager of Makerbay Foundation, said, “Neither do you need to be equipped with all production skills at the beginning, nor learning through designing. By helping and sharing with one another, everyone can be a designer, or a maker.” Through sharing tools, ideas, production skills and experiences, people from different fields can inspire, exchange with and contribute ideas to one another, letting those with ideas put their designs into practice instead of getting stuck in the stage of thinking. Producer: Manfred CHOW
20/11/2020
The Pulse
The Pulse
As an African proverb goes, when elephants fight it is the grass that suffers. Currently, Hong Kong is finding itself in the position of that grass. Starting this month, locally-made goods can no longer be exported to the United States with the label “Made in Hong Kong”. More on that later. But first, tech giants such as Apple, Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft have dominated the world for decades. Today though, so-called “platform” companies and the “platform economy” are in the ascendant. One research report by McKinsey suggests more than 30% of global economic activity - some US$60 trillion - could be mediated by digital platforms within the next six years. And that concerns regulators everywhere, including in mainland China, where the government worries that digital platform companies such as Tencent, and Alibaba and its affiliated Ant Group, could be getting too big and too influential. As his presidential term started, Donald Trump was sometimes full of praises for Chinese President Xi Jinping. Later though, he changed tack, accusing China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft and initiating a trade war with China in 2018. The US has since imposed hefty tariffs on Chinese goods, and China has naturally retaliated. In January, both sides called a truce, but Hong Kong has been caught in the US-China crossfire. Since the introduction of the National Security Law in May, the United States has revoked Hong Kong’s special trade status and imposed sanctions on top local and mainland officials. And starting this month, the “Made in Hong Kong” label is no longer allowed on locally-made goods exported to the US.
30/09/2020
The Works
The Works
The government’s Art Promotion Office frequently creates projects designed to connect art with the public. Their venues in Oil Street, North Point and the Hong Kong Visual Arts Centre on Kennedy Road focus on the community and provide art training programmes. Their latest public art project, along the Tuen Mun river, highlights the neighbourhood’s history and its public space. For visual artists like Monet, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Caravaggio, Vermeer and many more, the quality of light is central to their work. Some travelled great distances to find that perfect light. And light is also the subject that artist Bouie Choi is exploring in her third solo exhibition at Grotto Fine Arts, a continuation of her interest in urban landscape: “borrowed space, borrowed time”. The phrase has often been used to describe Hong Kong’s pre-Handover reality, including by writers on the territory such as Richard Hughes and Christopher Dewolf. Choi though, sees it differently. For her, rather than being a place of transience, Hong Kong is a “precious” place, and a permanent home. Hong Kong-born vocalist Denquar Chupak’s father is Thai and her mother, British. She says she sees this mix of cultures, combined with her father’s vocation as a musician, as a huge part of her identity. She first came on our show in 2017 to take part in our Christmas Special. Right now, she has returned to Hong Kong from London, the place she now calls home, and is here to tell us about how the pandemic has affected her musically.

Radio

LATEST
TOP HIT
LATEST
A-Z
26/11/2020
Backchat
Backchat
On Thursday’s Backchat, the Policy Address; and foreign judges in the CFA.  Chief Executive Carrie Lam declared on Wednesday that restoring Hong Kong's constitutional order and political system from chaos is one of her "urgent priorities", saying the city had experienced its most severe political challenges since 1997 in the past year.  In her forth policy address, Carrie Lam said the government has found all of the 330 hectares of land required to meet demand for public housing in the next 10 years, and she would not give up the plan to develop Lantau.  The government is also planning to give companies up to HK$18,000 per month for every fresh local graduate they recruit to work in the Greater Bay Area as a measure to help solve the employment problem for young people.  What do you think of this year’s Policy Address? Can it help bridge the political divide in the community? How will you benefit from it?  From 9:15-9:30, we’ll continue our discussion regarding the UK’s latest six-monthly report on HK and their suggestion to review arrangements for judges sitting on Hong Kong’s Court of Final Appeal. 8:30am-9:15 am Policy Address  8:30-9:15 Ryan Ip, Head of Land & Housing Research, Our Hong Kong Foundation  8:30-9:00 Kenneth Leung, former Accountancy sector lawmaker  8:30-9:00 Linda Li Che-lan, Professor of Political Science, Department of Public Policy, City University  9:15am-9:30am foreign judges on CFA.  Jerome A Cohen law professor at New York University, facul-ty director of its USAsia Law Institute and adjunct senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations

Website

LATEST
TOP HIT

節目重溫

節目重溫提供過往12個月的節目。
由於電台廣播時間有時可能出現偏差,網上存放的節目重溫版本因此未必絕對完整。

PROGRAMME ARCHIVE

Programme Archive provides archive service for programmes in the past 12 months.
Due to occasional air time discrepancies, online programme archive might not be in complete perfection.