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    監製:Diana Wan

    16/10/2020

    The government is full of surprises these days. On Monday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam abruptly cancelled her annual Policy Address. It had been scheduled for Wednesday but will not be delivered until an unknown date in November. Instead of going to Legco Lam went to Shenzhen to attend a ceremony where president Xi Jinping was celebrating the special economic zone’s 40th anniversary. Her stated reason for postponement however was the need to consult Beijing on economic policies. Meanwhile, last Monday, the Education Bureau announced the lifelong de-registration of a schoolteacher for allegedly “spreading pro-independence” messages in class. This is the first time a teacher has been de-registered for professional misconduct unrelated to sexual or criminal offences. Secretary for Education, Kevin Yeung warns there are more purges to come. To talk about this issue is Eunice Yung of New People's Party and Ip Kin-yuen, lawmaker and Vice-president of the Hong Kong Professional Teachers Union.

    With Autumn in the air, there is still no sign that Covid-19 is going away. On the contrary there has been a resurgence of cases in Europe. France declared a state of emergency, with Paris and eight other major cities imposing a night curfew. Spain’s capital, Madrid is also currently in a 15-day state of emergency. New lockdowns have also been imposed in the United Kingdom. Here in Hong Kong, fears have been expressed of a new spike in cases as winter approaches.


    聯絡: wanyt@rthk.hk


    集數

    EPISODES
    • Oath-taking for civil servants & Inauguration of Joe Biden

      Oath-taking for civil servants & Inauguration of Joe Biden

      As James Hacker, the fictional Minister for Administrative Affairs in the acclaimed British political comedy, “Yes, Minister” once said, “The three articles of Civil Service faith: It takes longer to do things quickly, it's more expensive to do them cheaply, and it's more democratic to do them in secret." That was supposed to be a joke but right now in a civil service rather closer to home, that joke is not sounding so funny. Moreover, Hong Kong’s 177,000 or so civil servants have now been told to put on their sternest faces as they are required to pledge their loyalty on pain of dismissal for not so doing. With me to talk about the loyalty declaration requirement for civil servants and public officers are Arisina Ma, president of the HK Public Doctors Association and Jeremy Young, a Central and Western District Councillor.

      The four years of Donald Trump’s presidency came to an end on Wednesday morning. He’ll be missed by some, but – according to opinion polls - not by most.
      Donald Trump did however achieve one breakthrough: he was the first US president to be impeached twice. But he still has loyal supporters like Senator Lindsey Graham, who reckons the Republican Party continues to need him. On the other hand, Mitch McConnell, now leader of the Republican opposition in the Senate, is busy stepping away from Trump accusing him of inciting the far-right extremists who stormed Capitol Hill on January 6th, an action that led to the deaths of six people. Former vice-president Mike Pence, a target for those protesters, broke with Trump over his attempts to stop Joe Biden’s inauguration, which took place in highly restrictive circumstances. The Pulse was on the ground in Washington DC for Inauguration Day.

      22/01/2021
    • Interview with Tony Wong of OGCIO on Leave Home Safe mobile app & Bishop Hill Reservoir

      Interview with Tony Wong of OGCIO on Leave Home Safe mobile app & Bishop Hill Reservoir

      As we enter a second year under the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic, many countries are seeing infection surges and mounting deaths. A key element in countering the spread of the virus is contact tracing to identify the source of infections following the discovery of a coronavirus patient. A wide range of digital tools have been developed for this purpose by governments, businesses and even ordinary citizens. But as with many new technologies, the first and foremost concern for some is data security and privacy. To talk about the Leave Home Safe mobile application is Tony Wong, Deputy Government Chief Information Officer.

      Wo Chai Hill, also known as Bishop Hill, is a small hill in Shek Kip Mei. The site covers one of several underground service reservoirs in Kowloon. For local residents, it’s also a rare urban green recreational space. Shortly before the end of last year, as demolition work on one underground reservoir started, a century-old 4,300 square metre gem came to light. And it wasn’t government officials or government experts that came to the rescue.

      15/01/2021
    • Mass arrest of 53 democrats: interview with Lau Siu-kai & Lo Kin-hei; Geoffrey Ma's retirement & interview w/ Henry Litton on judicial reform

      Mass arrest of 53 democrats: interview with Lau Siu-kai & Lo Kin-hei; Geoffrey Ma's retirement & interview w/ Henry Litton on judicial reform

      Interview with Lau Siu-kai and Lo Kin-hei on the mass arrest of 53 pro-democracy figures, Chief Justice Geoffrey Ma's retirement and interview with Henry Litton on judicial reform

      08/01/2021
    • Covid-19 vaccine discussion: David Hui, government health expert on Covid-19 & Alex Lam, Chairman of HK Patients' Voices

      Covid-19 vaccine discussion: David Hui, government health expert on Covid-19 & Alex Lam, Chairman of HK Patients' Voices

      Happy new year and welcome to The Pulse.

      2020 has been a year that many will be happy to see go. The Covid-19 pandemic has brought great disruption and many losses, both personally and economically, all around the world. We’ve all had to adapt to new ways of living and behaving because of the virus, and the coronavirus lifestyle: social distancing, mask wearing, working from home, and communicating, teaching and learning over Zoom will continue in 2021.
      The World Health Organization has received reports of almost 1.8 million deaths from Covid-19 around the world, even as scientists raced to develop a vaccine. And the vaccine arrived with unprecedented speed, with news of the first approval of a Covid-19 vaccine announced in the United Kingdom in December. Inoculation programmes are already under way in some countries. With me to talk about the Covid-19 vaccine situation in Hong Kong are David Hui, Head of the Division of Respiratory Medicine at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, who’s also a government health expert on Covid-19 and Alex Lam, Chairman of Hong Kong Patients' Voices.

      01/01/2021
    • Looking back at 2020

      Looking back at 2020

      Hello and welcome to The Pulse. And from all of us here, best wishes to you for this holiday season. There are still a few days left, but so far 2020 has been a year unlike any other in recent history- and that’s putting it mildy. Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary has designated “pandemic” as the word of the year, and you can see why. Oxford dictionaries report that searches for the word increased by 57,000%. As the pandemic intensified and lockdowns were enforced in most countries, “coronavirus” became the most searched term on the internet according to Google analytics data. Hong Kong, of course, has had more than Covid-19 to deal with. The aftermath of the social unrest in 2019 and the introduction of the new National Security Law have drastically changed the socio-political landscape. This week, we look at what 2020 has meant to four people from different walks of life.

      25/12/2020
    • Hong Kong's academic freedom & Long Time No Chat: Calling Los Angeles

      Hong Kong's academic freedom & Long Time No Chat: Calling Los Angeles

      Chief Executive Carrie Lam says the introduction of the National Security Law has been “remarkably effective in restoring stability”. Meanwhile, Zhang Xiaoming, deputy director of China’s Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office said last month that more reforms will be needed in several areas including the SAR’s mini constitution, the judicial system, national education, something called “oath optimisation” and “qualification screening” for civil servants. Article 137 of the Basic Law guarantees that education institutions will retain their autonomy and enjoy academic freedom. Article 4 of the National Security Law says it will respect and guarantee HK people’s human rights and freedoms under the Basic Law and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. In light of all this we talked to some academics about where we are now – after the introduction of the National Security Law.

      After more than a month of abortive legal actions and recounting of votes in last month’s US presidential election Donald Trump is still refusing to concede. Yet the Electoral College affirmed President-elect Joe Biden’s win on Monday. Biden received 306 electoral college votes, 36 more than the 270 he needed to win. Donald Trump received 232. In terms of the popular vote, Biden defeated Trump by more than seven million votes. But what are the long-term effects of Trump’s refusal to accept the outcome? And where does this leave the growing political divide in America. In the second episode of our “Long Time No Chat” mini-series, we look at some of the effects of politics on human relationships in the United States and here in Hong Kong.

      18/12/2020
    • Hong Kong Media discussion with Francis Lee of CUHK Journalism & Comm. & Tom Grundy, Editor-in-Chief of HKFP

      Hong Kong Media discussion with Francis Lee of CUHK Journalism & Comm. & Tom Grundy, Editor-in-Chief of HKFP

      The relationship between the media, the government and law enforcement has become increasingly volatile and tense since last year’s social unrest, even more so since the enactment of the National Security Law. Among the Incidents that have caused concern are the August police raid on Apple Daily, and later the arrest of its owner Jimmy Lai, who is currently remanded pending trail in April. In this instance he is facing fraud charges, with even more serious charges in the pipeline.
      There was also the September announcement that the police would stop recognising the press credentials of many journalists. They say they will only accept accreditation from government-registered outlets and “internationally known” foreign media. In November, RTHK producer Bao Choy was arrested on charges of making a false statement to obtain vehicle licence information from a public database while investigating the Yuen Long MTR attack. Then came more recent events at the broadcaster i-Cable. After a management reshuffle in August, followed by a request for staff to take unpaid leave and the firing of three senior engineers, the company then sacked a further 40 members of staff with immediate effect, including the entire investigative news team. In protest, the whole China news team resigned.

      With us to talk about the current media situation are Francis Lee, Director of Chinese University of Hong Kong School of Journalism and Communication, and Tom Grundy, Editor-in-chief of Hong Kong Free Press.

      11/12/2020
    • Interview with Andrew Heyn, UK British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macau

      Interview with Andrew Heyn, UK British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macau

      In her fourth Policy Address delivered last week, Chief Executive Carrie Lam dedicated a lengthy chapter to upholding “One Country, Two Systems” and stressed the need for constitutional order. She said that to fully implement the concept formulated by former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping, requires strict adherence to the Constitution and the Basic Law. Mrs Lam reiterated that there can be no challenge to rulings by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on implementation of the Basic law.
      The Joint Declaration, signed in 1984, set out a set of a range of principles which were to remain unchanged for 50 years after 1997.There are different interpretations of how that has worked out and to get the British point of view I am pleased to welcome Andrew Heyn, who is winding up his role as British Consul General to Hong Kong and Macao this week.

      04/12/2020
    • Policy Address 2020 discussion with: Liberal Party James Tien & Democratic Party Wu Chi-wai

      Policy Address 2020 discussion with: Liberal Party James Tien & Democratic Party Wu Chi-wai

      On Wednesday, Chief Executive Carrie Lam delivered her delayed Policy Address to a half-empty Legislative Council chamber. Opposition members had boycotted the session.
      The first part of the title of the Address “Striving Ahead” is a phrase frequently used by Chinese President Xi Jinping in his speeches. Lam detailed the support the Central Government has given the HKSAR and the results she says she achieved during her recent visit to Beijing. The Chief Executive also said it was the first time in 23 years that a specific chapter had been dedicated to upholding “One Country, Two Systems”. In that chapter, she said there is a need to restore Hong Kong’s constitutional order and political system from chaos caused by an inadequate understanding of the Constitution and the Basic Law and by ill-intentioned people influenced by external forces.

      With me to talk about the Policy Address are the Honorary Chair of the Liberal Party, James Tien, and the Chairman of the Democratic Party, Wu Chi-wai.

      27/11/2020
    • China's new antitrust guidelines on Fintech discussion with Anjani Trivedi & relabeling of

      China's new antitrust guidelines on Fintech discussion with Anjani Trivedi & relabeling of "Made in HK" to "Made in China"

      As an African proverb goes, when elephants fight it is the grass that suffers. Currently, Hong Kong is finding itself in the position of that grass. Starting this month, locally-made goods can no longer be exported to the United States with the label “Made in Hong Kong”. More on that later.

      But first, tech giants such as Apple, Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft have dominated the world for decades. Today though, so-called “platform” companies and the “platform economy” are in the ascendant. One research report by McKinsey suggests more than 30% of global economic activity - some US$60 trillion - could be mediated by digital platforms within the next six years. And that concerns regulators everywhere, including in mainland China, where the government worries that digital platform companies such as Tencent, and Alibaba and its affiliated Ant Group, could be getting too big and too influential.

      As his presidential term started, Donald Trump was sometimes full of praises for Chinese President Xi Jinping. Later though, he changed tack, accusing China of unfair trading practices and intellectual property theft and initiating a trade war with China in 2018. The US has since imposed hefty tariffs on Chinese goods, and China has naturally retaliated. In January, both sides called a truce, but Hong Kong has been caught in the US-China crossfire. Since the introduction of the National Security Law in May, the United States has revoked Hong Kong’s special trade status and imposed sanctions on top local and mainland officials. And starting this month, the “Made in Hong Kong” label is no longer allowed on locally-made goods exported to the US.

      20/11/2020